What’s Love Got To Do With It? Isang Gabi Tatlong Reyna


One rainy Friday night in August, 1990, all roads led to the Metropolitan Theater where the top-rating and the most awarded musical-variety TV show Vilma! would air one of its most-watched episodes, ever. Vilma Santos, who would turn 37 that year, was on cloud nine. She was the toast of the town, in both movies and television. Her Lino Brocka directed movie “Hahamakin Lahat” was a commercial and critical success. Come hell or high water (there was a tropical storm), fans queued at the SRO theaters and saw her out and out Cruella Deville role as Gabby Concepcion’s paramour. Some like her bad. Vilma, the versatile actress scored again. Earlier, she won her first of six Star PMPC and her fourth Urian best actress awards for her ’best’ performance in years in “Pahiram ng Isang Umaga,” which was directed by Ishmael Bernal. She also just finished “Kapag Langit ang Humatol” with Laurice Guillen at the helm. At the PMPC Star Awards for TV, Vilma’s show harvested the biggest awards. And on that particular rainy night at the jam packed Metropolitan Theater, Vilma Santos was paying tribute to a Movie Queen she loved dearly and who reciprocated that love. Amalia Fuentes was the special guest, who just turned 50. Vilma! was giving her a tribute, with special appearances of former Sampaguita Productions ’stars.’ Everybody knew that despite the infamous Romeo Vasquez/Vilma Santos le affair Amalia and Vilma remained the best of friends. With a sincere, charismatic and humble La Vilma, who could resist her charm? Yes, the original Taray Queen, forceful and outspoken former queen of Philippine movies, she with a strong personality but with the most beautiful face in Philippine cinema, acquiesced to her friend’s request to grace the most watched TV show. Love begets love. Respect begets respect.

The retired and reclusive Amalia Fuentes could not say no to the current darling of Philippine movies. To recall, the senior and junior movie queens appeared in these movies: Bulaklak at Paru-paro (1970), Mga Reynang Walang Trono (1976) and Asawa Ko, Huwag Mong Agawin (1986). Amalia directed Vilma’s episode in Mga Reyna and agreed to second billing to Vilma in Asawa Ko. No doubt about it, Amalia Muhlach Sumilang Fuentes, is a Vilmanian. To seal their sisterhood and camaraderie, Vilma is Ninang to Liezl Martinez and to the latter’s son Alfonso. Why, Liezl even sang a song ’’Wind Beneath My Wings’ to her surprised mother that night which drove the strong-willed and still beautiful Amalia to tears. A Kodak moment, indeed. Priceless! While interviewing the three Muhlach generations, Fuentes, Liezl and young daughter Aliyanna, Amalia revealed to Vilma that she is protective of her ’unica hija’ Liezl. “Ay naku, I think I also have become like my Mom, I’m also very protective of my children,” Liezl remarks. Ex-Sampaguita stars Luis Gonzales and German Moreno served as Vilma’s co-hosts who provided comic relief as they recalled their Sampaguita days with Amalia Fuentes. Debonair Eddie Gutierrez also came to greet Amalia a Happy Birthday. Then Daisy Romualdez, Amalia’s contemporary and best friend danced the mambo/cha-cha with dancing queen Vilma, along with Kuya Germs and Luis Gonzalez. “I messed up that dance number,” Daisy gamely confesses, “wala kasing practice.” On her friend Nena (Amalia), Daisy admires her colleague for being frank and outspoken like her. “Nagkasundo kami kaagad dahil pareho kaming prangka ni Nena, hindi kami plastik,” she bemuses. The highlight of the evening was when Vilma introduced another special guest, the other Queen of Philippine movies, Amalia’s rival, Ms. Susan Roces. Radiant and regal in her Susan Roces hairdo and dark, glossy gown, Ms. Roces was polite and generous with her comments on her kumarerival. Vilma, obviously starstruck, throws a question to Susan: “What can you say about Ate Nena as being mataray and you Ate Susan as soft-spoken?” Susan: “I’d like to make a correction Vi, Amalia is not mataray, she is just outspoken, pero nasa lugar, so there’s a difference there.” Applause from the audience. “Alam mo ba Vi na my mother dotes on Amalia dahil pareho silang prangka? Sabi ng Mommy ko, iyang si Susan hindi pumaris kay Amalia, prangka at di iyakin.” Amalia on Susan: “I want to be like Susan dahil she is so sweet and soft-spoken. Doon nga sa weekly sessions namin, sabi ni Doctor Perez, why don’t you be like Susan, matiyaga sa fans, ikaw, sumakit lang ang ulo mo, ayaw mo nang harapin ang fans.” Guffaws and chuckles. The conversation turns serious. Vilma: “How did you handle the competition? Did the intrigues get in your way, affected you?” Susan, smiling sweetly, with a politically correct comment: “Hindi naman. We were in the same movie company and we were treated fairly. We’re like one big family.

In your case with Nora, and Gloria Romero and Nida Blanca, it’s different. Magka-iba kayo ng movie companies.” Vilma: “Ay ang sarap, sana, one of these days magksama rin kami ni Nora Aunor like this one, Ate Susan and Ate Nena, together.” Amalia Fuentes, Susan Roces and Vilma Santos. Isang Gabi, Tatlong Reyna. Susan, a movie queen, honoring a rival-friend movie queen Amalia on her 50th. birthday. Amalia confessed on the show and thanked Susan for throwing a surprise birthday party for her days before the Vilma show. What’s love got to do with it? In the case of Susan and Amalia, it’s love. In the case of Vilma and Amalia, it’s also love. Diva to diva. Competitors can be friends. May it also happen to Vilma Santos and Nora Aunor. Rivals on the silver screen, friends for life. After all, love conquers all. It is more permanent than fleeting fame and fortune. – Mario O. Garces, V Magazine Issue Nos 6 (READ MORE)

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Early Female Directors

Karugtong ang Kahapon

Before Marilou Diaz Abaya (Minsan Pa Nating Hagkan Ang Nakaraan, 1983; Alyas Baby Tsina, 1984), Rory Quintos (Anak, 2000), Olivia Lamasan (In My Life, 2009; Maalaala Mo Kaya? Regalo episode, 2005), and Laurice Guillen (Dahil Mahal Kita: The Dolzura Cortez Story, 1993; Kapag Langit Ang Humatol, 1990; Ipagpatawad Mo, 1991), Fely Crisostomo, Maria Saret, Leody Diaz, and Consuelo P. Osorio were the only known female directors. They have become part of Vilma Santos’ filmography.

Fely Crisostomo is a Filipina film director and actress. She was the first woman to win the FAMAS Award for Best Director in 1967.- Wikipedia (READ MORE)

Fely Crisostomo’s Vilma Santos Films

Susan Kelly

Maria Saret is a Filipina film director and writer. She was first recognized for her 1966 screenplay of the film Miranda: Ang lagalag na sirena starring teen star, Marifi. In 1973 she directed her first feature film, the drama about women in prison, “Bakit may bilanggo sa anak ni Eba?” starring Gina Pareño, Rosanna Ortiz and Alona Alegre. Saret was nominated for the 1989 FAMAS best director award for the movie Lorenzo Ruiz, The Saint…A Filipino! She won the best screenplay at the Film Academy of the Philippines for the same film.

Maria Saret’s Vilma Santos Films

– Vi co-starred with Dante Rivero (their second film, after Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz), Anthony Alonzo, Sandy Garcia, Cloyd Robinson.(READ MORE)

Sweethearts

Leody Diaz is a Filipina film director and actress. Her earlier credit consists of 1965’s Labanang Babae (The fight of Women) as an actor and as the writer of Bella Bandida (Bella, The Woman Bandit), She started directing in 1967 via Target: The A-go-go Generation, a comedy musical which became her main genre of her body of work.

Topical, Realistic Themes “…Tony and the Tagalog Ilang-Ilang Productions plan not only to produce big budgeted films for international competition next year, but to bring into local movies topical, realistic themes like student power, social unrest, violence in our midst, etc. But meanwhile, the gring has to go on. Right now he is filming Blue Seal Mata Hari under the direction of Leody Diaz, where he is experimenting on teaming up Filipino actors with colored women and vice – versa. And for the first time, he said, a Filipina actress, sex siren Liza Belmonte, consented to be kissed by a colored man in this film. So it goes too with Tony, where he is paired with two colored women with kissing scenes…” – P. Oden Amurao, Republic Weekly, 03 October 1967 (READ MORE)

Leody Diaz’s Vilma Santos Films

Jukebox King

Consuelo P. Osorio is a Filipina film director and actress. Her earlier acting credits consists of 1949’s Bulakenyo and 1984’s Bagets Part 2, her first and last films.. Like Leody Diaz, Consuelo became active in late 60s to early 70s directing singing teen stars in musical-comedy or musical-drama genres. Peque Galaga, the popular director of Oro Plata Mata fame, was quoted saying, Consuelo P. Osorio of Premiere Productions as his early mentor because, “It was she who tutored him on points such as casting that would spell success in surviving in the industry.”

Ateng Osorio – “…I asked the receptionist who was the TV writer present that day and she mentioned the name: Consuelo Osorio, also known as Ateng Osorio. She told me which studio she was working that time and I proceeded to find her. Unfortunately, upon entering the TV barn, a production assistant told me that she actually went to the cafeteria to have coffee. So I went to the cafeteria and tried to find her. I asked the person at the till to point out to me Miss Osorio, and she did. She was seated at a table, smoking, talking to another lady, and both of them, I noticed, were looking at me. I approached them and introduced myself. She gave me a handshake and introduced the other lady: “She’s Mitos Villareal, our director.” After shaking Miss Villareal’s hand, I didn’t hesitate to tell them that I was there because I want to become a writer for TV and the movies. They both smiled. “You’re a bit too young to work as a writer,” Ateng told me. “Besides, you look more like an actor than a writer! We immediately noticed you the moment you entered this room. You are unusually fair. You are even fairer than Jeanne Young. Leave your phone number with me, I’ll find something and I’ll give you a call….Well, perfect timing. I need someone your age. I am auditioning today and tomorrow for new talents for BBC Channel 2. Since I already know that you can do it, you’re in. I need you to come for taping on Saturday night. Come with me and I’ll give you the script.” I wanted to say no, but for some reason, I couldn’t. Besides, this lady was super nice and I didn’t want to say no to her. So I went with her and we proceeded to the office and the producer of the show handed me a blue mimeographed script. It says: PROGRAM: Dulambuhay ni Rosa Vilma WRITER: O.B. Pangilinan MAINSTAY: Vilma Santos. To make the long story short, I ended up appearing with Vilma Santos and Walter Navarro. I played Walter’s younger brother in that episode. Thank God all my scenes were take one. And after the show aired, all my friends teased me non-stop about it. Ateng Osorio was directing films that time as well and she wanted to cast me in them but I begged off. I finally told her that acting is not what I wanted to do. I want to write. She then said: “I’m committed for seven months to direct movies which I have already written myself. After they are all finished, we’ll discuss a movie I will be directing for Barangay Pictures. I have a storyline. You will write the screenplay…” – Jose Mari Lee, Pinoy Comics TV Movies (READ MORE)

Consuelo P. Osorio’s Vilma Santos Films

  • I Do Love You (1970) – Eddie Peregrina-Vilma Santos film with Esperanza Fabon and Bebong Osorio. (READ MORE)
  • Jukebox King (1969) – Eddie Peregrina-Vilma Santos film with Edgar Mortiz, Esperanza Fabon and Bebong Osorio. (READ MORE)
  • Mardy (1969) – Eddie Peregrina-Vilma Santos film with Esperanza Fabon and Bebong Osorio. (READ MORE)
  • My Darling Eddie (1969) – Eddie Peregrina-Vilma Santos film with Edgar Mortiz, Esperanza Fabon and Bebong Osorio. (READ MORE)

Other Female Directors

  • Ophelia Paris (1973) Directed by Celia Diaz-Laurel. The first movie of Vilma Santos and Cocoy Laurel, the other films are: Disco Fever and Pinay American Style (READ MORE).
  • Mga Reynang Walang Trono (1976) Directed by Amalia Muhlach (Amalia Fuentes). “…Amalia directed Vilma’s episode in Mga Reyna and agreed to second billing to Vilma in Asawa Ko. No doubt about it, Amalia Muhlach Sumilang Fuentes, is a Vilmanian. To seal their sisterhood and camaraderie, Vilma is Ninang to Liezl Martinez and to the latter’s son Alfonso. Why, Liezl even sang a song ’’Wind Beneath My Wings’ to her surprised mother that night which drove the strong-willed and still beautiful Amalia to tears…” – Mario O. Garces (READ MORE)

an Emmanuel H. Borlaza films and other directors

Emmanuel H. Borlaza directed 24 films with Vilma Santos, mostly during the musical era of the 70s and in the 80s where movies were predominantly adapted from serialized comics/novel. His films became a lucrative moneymaker that he was allowed to brand them with the tag line: “an Emmanuel H. Borlaza film.” From musical, drama, comedy, fantasy, sex or horror genres, name it and Borlaza did them all.

His films lack the arthouse style and social relevance that critics loves most in a Brocka or Bernal films but who cares about the critics when the paying public loves them. And the producers demand his service, from Doc Perez of Sampaguita Pictures, Atty. Esperidion Laxa of Tagalog Ilang Ilang Productions and later on, Vic Del Rosario of Viva Films and Lily Monteverde of Regal Films. Clearly, his films exists with one purpose, to entertain the masses not to depress or remind them with the country’s sad fate of economy or the below poverty line lives of many.

The success of the Vilma-Borlaza films gave Vilma Santos versatility and preparation to a more serious acting career. It also narrowed the popularity gap between her and the musical era’s darling of the 70s, Nora Aunor. These are perhaps, the most significant contributions of Emmanuel Borlaza to Vilma’s career. Vilma who was considered only second to Nora couldn’t matched her singing talent and so, Borlaza countered this lack of singing with films that showcased Vilma’s acting versatility.

From the folklore mermaid in Dyesebel at ang Mahiwagang Kabibe to fighting giants in Darna and the Giants to a fast-talker-gossip-mongering vendor in Tsismosang Tindera and to good-hearted prostitutes in Mga Rosas sa Putikan, Borlaza let Vilma Santos experience a wide range of roles, from comedic fantasy to dramatic adult roles.   These experiments prepared her to a later more serious and versatile acting career.   Their success made other directors interested in giving her roles oftenly considered for her closest rivals.  Projects lined up and awaits her availability.   Borlaza and Santos’ collaboration produced a string of box office hits from early 70s’ Dama De Noche to their last outing in late 80s’ Ibigay Mo Sa Akin Ang Bukas.   Their success established their career as one of the most bankable and in-demand director/actor team, making her the longest reighning box office queen of all time and him a money maker director.

When time for Vilma to moved on with other collaborators, Borlaza handled other stars with much success!  He directed Alma Moreno in smash hit, Eva Fonda 16;  Sharon Cuneta in her memorable rag to riches films, Bituin Walang Ningning and Bukas Luluhod Ang Mga Tala; Snooky Serna in her fantasy hit, Blusang Itim and Marecel Soriano as the spoiled brat in Yesterday Today and Tomorrow. These films gave us some of the most memorable movie lines that most Filipinos would still remember like Cherie Gil’s campy dialouge: “You’re Nothing but second rate Trying hard, Copy Cat!” or Sharon’s promise of revenge: “pinapangako ko inay…bukas luluhod ang mga tala! (I’ll promise you mother, tommorow the stars will kneel down, something to that effect, litterally.)”

In 2003, Borlaza who was trained by National Artist, Severino Montano, received recognitions from his peers with the Gawad Direk award from the Directors Guild of the Philippines.   He lamented, “If I were to live my life again, I would still choose the same line of work. It is now payback time to the industry that gave me the best years of my life.”  Referring the “pay back time” with trying to do more for the industry who gave so much blessing in his career as he retired his director’s chair.   He continue his “pay back” with his involvement with two organizations thats very dear to him, the directors and screenwriters guilds.  In most recent years, he became more involve through his work for the NMPP or Nagkakaisang Manggagawa ng Pelikulang Pilipino (the united workers of Filipino films).  One of NMPP initive, a project that Borlaza worked so hard was to have a low cost housing for movie industry workers.  This year, he was appointed by President Aquino as the deputy chaiman of the Movie and Television Rating and Classification Board.

AWARDS: Palanca Awardee; DGPI’s 2003 Gawad Direk; FAMAS 1969 Best Screenplay – Pinagbuklod ng Langit (Heaven’s Fate); FAMAS 1968 Best Screenplay – Psycho Maniac; FAMAS 1988 FAMAS Best Director Nominations – Paano Tatakasan Ang Bukas?; FAMAS 1971 FAMAS Best Director Nominations – I Love Mama, I Love Papa; FAMAS 1969 FAMAS Best Director Nominations – Kapatid Ko Ang Aking Ina; FAMAS 1968 FAMAS Best Director Nominations – Psycho Maniac; FAP 1990 Best Story Adaptation – Kapag langit ang humatol; FAP 1988 Best Director – Paano Tatakasan Ang Bukas?; Gawad Urian 1994 Best Screenplay Nominations – Bakit Ngayon Ka Lang?; Gawad Urian 1990 Best Screenplay Nominations – Kapag langit ang humatol

Some Trivia:  (1) In addition to the box office hit films, Borlaza gave Vilma her very first best actress award via Dama De Noche.  (2) They did two films in the USA, Aloha My Love and Don’t Ever Say Goodbye.  Both films paired Vilma with on and off the screen love team, Edgar Mortiz.  (3) Later on, Borlaza and Vilma did another film in the USA, Romansa, with now ex-husband, Edu Manzano. (4) Vilma did four Darna movies, two of which was directed by Borlaza and were considered the most successfull in terms of revenue.  (5) Lipa Darna Lipad was considered the most memorable of the four.  Unfortunately, there is no copies of the film in existence today.   (6)The Darna role has been re-invented and redone so many time by so many local actresses but the most memmorable and considered the best Darna ever is Vilma Santos.

FILMS BY THE NUMBERS

NUMBER ONE: WITH 24 FILMS!  EMMANUEL H. BORLAZA – 1970 I Love You, Honey; 1970 Renee Rose; 1971 Angelica; 1972 Aloha, My Love; 1972 Dama De Noche ; 1972 Don’t Ever say Goodbye; 1972 Leron, Leron, Sinta; 1972 Remembrance; 1973 Darna and the Giants; 1973 Dyesebel at ang Mahiwagang Kabibe; 1973 Lipad, Darna, Lipad; 1973 Maria Cinderella; 1973 Tsismosang Tindera; 1976 Makahiya at Talahib; 1976 Mga Rosas sa Putikan; 1978 Bakit Kailangan Kita?; 1978 Kampus; 1979 Coed; 1980 Gusto Ko Siya, Mahal Kita; 1980 Romansa; 1980 Yakapin Mo Ako, Lalaking Matapang; 1986 Asawa ko, Huwag Mong Agawin; 1986 Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow; 1987 Ibigay Mo Sa Akin Ang Bukas

…and other directors!

8 Films:  ISHMAEL BERNAL- 8 (Broken Marriage, Dalawang Pugad Isang Ibon, Good Morning Sunshine, Ikaw ay Akin, Inspiration, Now and Forever, Pahiram Ng Isang Umaga, Relasyon);  LEONARDO L. GARCIA- 8 (Edgar Loves Vilma, Nag-aapoy na Damdamin, Pinagbuklod ng Pag-ibig, Ayaw Kong Maging Kerida, Eternally, Little Darling, Phantom Lady, Pulot-gata Pwede Kaya?)

7 Films:  LUIS ENRIQUEZ – 7 (Ex-Wife, Halik sa Kamay Halik sa Paa, Hindi Nakakahiya, Ikaw Lamang, Kasalanan Kaya?, Nakakahiya?, Simula ng Walang Katapusan);  ELWOOD PEREZ – 7 (Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos, Lipad Darna Lipad, Magkaribal, Masarap Masakit ang Umibig, Nakawin Natin ang Bawat Sandali, Pakawalan Mo Ako, Pinay American Style)

6 Films:  ROMY SUSARA – 6 (Anak ng Aswang, Ang Kundoktora, Carinosa, Hiwalay, Tatlong Mukha ni Rosa Vilma, Vilma and the Beep Beep Minica); EDDIE GARCIA – 6 (Imortal, Paano Ba ang Mangarap?, Palimos Ng Pag-ibig, Pinagbuklod ng Langit, Saan Nagtatago Ang Pag-ibig?, Sinasamba Kita);  ARMANDO DE GUZMAN – 6 (Basta’t Isipin mong Mahal Kita, Mga Batang Bangketa, Naligaw na Anghel, Sa Bawat Pintig ng Puso, Sapagkat Sila’y Aming mga Anak, Wonderful World of Music)

5 Films: PABLO SANTIAGO – 5 (Batang Iwahig, Bato sa Buhangin, Batya’t Palu-Palo, Big Ike’s Happening, Vilma Viente Nueve);  JOSE DE VILLA – 5 (Give Me Your Love, Iginuhit ng Tadhana, Mother Song, Sixteen, Trudis Liit);  FELY H. CRISOSTOMO  – 5 (Karugtong ang Kahapon, Love is for the Two of Us, May Hangganan ang Pag-Ibig, Mga Reynang Walang Trono, Tok, Tok, Palatok)

4 Films:  JOEY GOSIENGFIAO – 4 (Hatinggabi Na, Vilma, Lipad Darna Lipad, Promo Girl, Takbo Vilma Dali);  DANNY ZIALCITA – 4 (Gaano Kadalas ang Minsan?, Karma, Langis at Tubig, T-Bird at Ako);  CONSUELO P. OSORIO  – 4 (I Do Love You, Mardy, My Darling Eddie, The Jukebox King);  CIRIO H. SANTIAGO – 4 (Ang Galing-galing Mo Mrs. Jones, Ging, Happy Days are Here Again, Modelong Tanso)

3 Films:  NILO SAEZ – 3 (Biktima, Kampanerang Kuba, Pag-ibig ko sa iyo lang Ibibigay);  MAR S. TORRES – 3 (Anak ang Iyong Ina, King and Queen for a Day, Iginuhit ng Tadhana);  LUCIANO B. CARLOS – 3 (Let’s Do the Salsa, Pag-Ibig, Masdan ang Ginawa Mo, Teribol Dobol); LINO BROCKA – 3 (Adultery: Aida Macaraeg, Hahamakin Lahat, Rubia Servios); LEODY M. DIAZ – 3 (Because You’re Mine, Dulce Corazon, Sweethearts); LAURO PACHECO – 3 (Hindi Nahahati ang Langit, Kay Tagal ng Umaga, Mga Mata Ni Angelita);  LAURICE GUILLEN – 3 (Dahil Mahal Kita The Dolzura Cortez Story, Ipagpatawad Mo, Kapag Langit Ang Humatol); CHITO S. RONO – 3 (Bata, Bata…Paano Ka Ginawa?, Dekada’70, Ikaw Lang); CELSO AD CASTILLO – 3 (Burlesk Queen, Pagputi ng Uwak Pag-itim ng Tagak, Tag-ulan sa Tag-araw); A. GREGORIO – 3 (From the Bottom of my Heart, My Pledge of Love, Songs and Lovers)

2 Films:  VICENTE DE VILLA – 2 (Aninong Bakal, Larawan ng Pag-ibig); TONY SANTOS  – 2 (The Sensations, Young Lovers); TONY CAYADO – 2 (Kamay na Gumagapang, Young Love);  TITO C. SANCHEZ – 2 (Bertang Kerengkeng, Ibong Lukaret); MARYO J. DELOS REYES – 2 (Sinungaling Mong Puso, Tagos ng Dugo); MARILOU DIAZ ABAYA – 2 (Minsan pa Natin Hagkan Ang Nakaraan, Alyas Baby Tsina); MARIA SARET – 2 (Amorseko: Kumakabit Kumakapit, Susan Kelly Edad 20); MANING SONGCO – 2 (Sweet Sweet Love, Dalagang Nayon);  JOSE MIRANDA CRUZ – 2 (Duelo sa Sapang Bato, Eagle Commandos);  JOSE ‘PEPE’ WENCESLAO – 2 (Baby Vi, Teen-Age Senorita);  GIL M. PORETES – 2 (Miss X, Never Ever Say Goodbye); DING M. DE JESUS – 2 (Maria Cecilia, Sino ang may Karapatan?); CESAR GALLARDO – 2 (Ito ang Pilipino, King Khayam and I); CARLO J. CAPARAS – 2 (Lipa: Arandia Massacre, Rizal Alih, Zamboanga Massacre); ARMANDO GARCES – 2 (Darna vs. the Planetwoman, De Colores);  AL QUINN – 2 (Disco Fever, Swing it Baby);

1 Film:   YANG SHIH CHIN – 1 – Twin Fists for Justice; WENN V. DERAMAS – 1 – D’ Lucky Ones;  TONY CRUZ – 1 – Ikaw Ang Mahal Ko;  RORY B. QUINTOS – 1 – Anak;  RONALD REMY – 1 – Sa Baril Magtutuos;  PABLO S GOMEZ – 1 – Ding Dong; OSCAR MIRANDA – 1 – Rock, Baby, Rock; OLIVIA M. LAMASAN – 1 – In My Life;  MIKE RELON MAKILING – 1 – Doctor, Doctor, We Are Sick;  MIKE DE LEON – 1 – Sister Stella L.;  LEROY SALVADOR – 1 – Muling Buksan ang Puso; JOSE JAVIER REYES – 1 – Nag-iisang Bituin; JOEL LAMANGAN – 1 – Mano Po 3 My Love;  J. ERASTHEO NAVOA – 1 – Darna at Ding; IKE JARLEGO JR – 1 – Hanggang Ngayon Ika’y Minamahal;  G. F. C. – 1 – Mapagbigay ang Mister Ko;  FRANK GRAY JR. – 1 – Buhay Artista, Ngayon;  DON WEIS – 1 – Longest Hundred Miles;  DANNY OCHOA – 1 – Twin Fists for Justice;  DANILO CABRERA  – 1 – Relaks ka Lang, Sagot Kita;  CONRADO CONDE – 1 – Iginuhit ng Tadhana;  CLOYD ROBINSON – 1 – Darna at Ding; CELIA DIAZ LAUREL – 1 – Ophelia at Paris; GENEROSA SANTIAGO – 1 – Big Ike’s Happening; BOBBY SANTIAGO – 1 – Vivian Volta; BEN FELEO – 1 – The Young Idols; AUGUSTO BUENAVENTURA – 1 – Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz; ARSENIO BAUTISTA – 1 – Wonder Vi;  ARMANDO HERRERA – 1 – Dugo at Pag-Ibig sa Kapirasong Lupa; ANTONIO JOSE PEREZ – 1 – Haplos;  AMALIA MUHLACH – 1 – Mga Reynang Walang Trono; ABRAHAM CRUZ  – 1 – Love Letters; (no data available: directors unknown) – Ito ang Dahilan, Hampaslupang Maton, Vilma My Darling, Morena Martir, Love at First Sight, Nobody’s Child, Our Love Affair, Bulaklak at Paru-paro

RELATED READING:

Filipino Movie Queens with Vilma Santos in Films

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Gloria Romero (born December 16, 1933) is a Filipino a multi-awarded actress whose career spans 60 years. Acknowledged as the original Queen of Philippine Movies. She hold two record in FAMAS award history: She is the only actress in Philippine movie history to win the FAMAS Best Actress Award for a comedy role and the oldest FAMAS Best Actress winner, receiving the prestigious accolade in 2001 when she was 67 years old. (Wikepedia)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 13 (Anak ang Iyong Ina, Iginuhit ng Tadhana, De Colores, Pinagbuklod ng Langit, Anak ng Aswang, Lipad Darna Lipad, Happy Days are Here Again, Karugtong ang Kahapon, Nakakahiya?, Hindi Nakakahiya, Makahiya at Talahib, Saan Nagtatago Ang Pag-ibig?, Kapag Langit Ang Humatol)

RELATED READING: DIVA TO DIVA: TERMS OF ENDEARMENT

Movie Queens – Vilma Santos & Gloria Romero from SFAS – VSR on Vimeo.

 

Nora Aunor (born Nora Cabaltera Villamayor on May 21, 1953) is a multi-awarded Filipino actress, singer and producer. Aunor has also topbilled several stage plays, television shows, and concerts. She is regarded as the “Superstar in Philippine Entertainment Industry”. In 1999, Aunor received the Centennial Honor for the Arts awarded by the Cultural Center of the Philippines (CCP). She was the only film actress included in the prestigious list of awardees. In 2010, she was hailed by the Green Planet Awards as one of the 10 Asian Best Actresses of the Decade. (Wikepedia)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 8 (Happy Days are Here Again, Dugo at pag-ibig sa kapirasong lupa, Young Love, Big Ike’s Happening, Mga Mata Ni Angelita, Ikaw ay Akin, Pinagbuklod ng Pag-ibig, T-Bird at Ako)

RELATED READING: Sino ba talaga ang mas mahusay umarte, si Vilma o si Nora?
Vilmanians and Noranians Surveyed
‘VERY LONG RIVALRY”
NORA AND VILMA, APART AND TOGETHER

 

Marlene Dauden, (born in Philippines) is considered one of the greatest Filipina drama actresses of all time. She achieved her legendary status as a film thespian during her film career that spanned from the 1950s up to the 1970s. During the height of her fame, she was one of the most bankable stars of Sampaguita Pictures, which used to be one of the leading Philippine movie studios of the era. (Wikepedia)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 7 (Sa Bawat Pintig ng Puso, Kay Tagal ng Umaga, Maria Cecilia, Hindi Nahahati ang Langit, Kasalanan Kaya?, Sino ang may Karapatan?, Happy Days are Here Again)

RELATED READING: Marlene Dauden
MARLENE DAUDEN: 50s-60s DRAMA ICON

 

Charito Solis (6 October 1935 – 9 January 1998) was a FAMAS and Gawad Urian award-winning Filipino film actress. Acknowledged as one of the leading dramatic actresses of post-war Philippine cinema, she was tagged either as the “Anna Magnani of the Philippines” or as “the Meryl Streep of the Philippines. (Wikepedia)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 6 (Happy Days are Here Again, Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz, Modelong Tanso, Ipagpatawad Mo, Dahil Mahal Kita The Dolzura Cortez Story, Hanggang Ngayon Ika’y Minamahal)

RELATED READING: Charito Solis, the Empress of Drama
CHARITO SOLIS HALL OF FAME FOR BEST ACTRESS

Movie Queens – Vilma Santos & Charito Solis from SFAS – VSR on Vimeo.

 

Celia Rodriguez ay isang artista sa Pilipinas. Una siang nakitang gumanap sa mga pelikula ng Premiere Production noong huling dekada 1950. Siya ay nanalo ng apat na FAMAS Awards: isa bilang pinakamahusay na aktres ng 1971 para sa pelikulang Lilet at tatlo pa bilang pinakamahusay na pangalawang aktres ng 1964 (Kulay Dugo ang Gabi), 1966 (The Passionate Strangers) at 2003 (Magnifico). (Wikipedia)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 6 (Lipad Darna Lipad, Biktima, Karugtong ang Kahapon, Mga Rosas sa Putikan, Coed, Darna at Ding)

RELATED READING: Lilet’s Little Secret (Or How Celia Rodriguez made my life worth living.)

 

Lolita Rodriguez, {Dolores Clark in real life} was born on January 29, 1935 in Urdaneta Pangasinan. In 1953, at the age of 18, she entered the movies. She was given walk-on roles. As an extra, she used to earn 5 pesos per appearance. Her first movie was Ating Pag-ibig, followed by Gorio at Tekla, El Indio, Cofradia, Kiko, Reyna Bandida, Sa Isang Sulyap mo Tita and Diwani. (Video48)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 6 (Trudis Liit, Kay Tagal ng Umaga, Hindi Nahahati ang Langit, Kasalanan Kaya?, Sino ang may Karapatan?, Happy Days are Here Again)

RELATED READING: DRAMA QUEEN LOLITA RODRIGUEZ Circa 1954-60

 

Amalia Fuentez Amalia Fuentes was born on August 27, 1940 in Philippines and she is a famous TV and film actress. Fuentes started her career in 1956 with the film called “Rodora”. She acted in many other films and TV series such as: “Inang mahal”, “Pretty Boy”, “Kahit isang saglit.” (FamousWhy)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 5 (De Colores, Bulaklak at Paru-paro, Happy Days are Here Again, Mga Reynang Walang Trono, Asawa ko, Huwag Mong Agawin)

RELATED READING: AMALIA FUENTES BIOGRAPHY

 

Barbarra Perez, dubbed as Audrey Hepburn of the Philippines was a famous Filipina movie star of the fifties and sixties. Born in the year 1938, Barbara is married to another actor Robert Arevalo. Barbara made several hit movies under the defunct Sampaguita Pictures. Both Barbara and her husband won the best actor awards in 1966 for the movie “Daigdig ng mga Api” or the world of the downtrodden. (Wikipilipinas)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 4 (Ito ang Pilipino, Hatinggabi Na Vilma, Nakakahiya?, Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos)

RELATED READING: WHY BARBARA PEREZ SAID NO TO HOLLYWOOD

 

Nida Blanca Dorothy Acueza Jones, (January 6, 1936 – November 7, 2001) popularly known by her stage name Nida Blanca, was a Filipina actress. She starred in over 163 movies and 14 television shows and received over 16 awards for movies and six awards for television during her 50-year film career. She was named one of 15 Best Actress of all Time by YES magazine. She was stabbed to death in a parking lot in San Juan City on November 7, 2001.

Total Number of films with Vilma: 3 (Ibulong mo sa Diyos, Happy Days Are Here Again, Pag-ibig masdan ang ginawa mo)

RELATED READING: NIDA BLANCA LOOKS BACK

 

Rita Gomez The first Filipino to be billed with a title before her name. On a comeback stint in the Bomba (Bold) Era of Philippine movies, the title “Ms.” was added by her manager before her name to maintain her stature as one of the Philippines’ most revered actresses. (movie-industry.blogspot.com)

Total Number of films with Vilma: 2 (Anak ang iyong ina!, Takbo Vilma Dali)

RELATED READING: RITA GOMEZ BIOGRAPHY
10 Most Loved Babaeng Bakla

Other Filipino Movie Queens who are still active and who made films with Vilma are: Gina Pareno (Ibigay Mo Sa Akin Ang Bukas), Maricel Soriano (Yesterday, Today and Tomorrown), Lorna Tolentino (Sinasamba Kita), Claudine Baretto (Anak), Alma Moreno (Magkaribal), Rio Locsin (Haplos). Hilda Koronel (Gaano Kadalas Ang Minsan).

RELATED READING: FEMALE COSTARS (PHOTOS)

What’s Love Got To Do With It – Isang Gabi Tatlong Reyna

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One rainy Friday night in August, 1990, all roads led to the Metropolitan Theater where the top-rating and the most awarded musical-variety TV show VILMA! would air one of its most-watched episodes, ever.

Vilma Santos, who would turn 37 that year, was on cloud nine.  She was the toast of the town, in both movies and television.   Her Lino Brocka directed movie, “Hahamakin Lahat” was a commercial and critical success.  Come hell or high water (there was a tropical storm), fans queued at the SRO theaters and saw her out and out Cruella Deville role as Gabby Concepcion’s paramour.  Some like her bad.

Vilma, the versatile actress scored again.  Earlier, she won her first of six Star PMPC and her fourth Urian best actress awards for her ’best’ performance in years in Pahiram ng Isang Umaga, which was directed by Ishmael Bernal.  She also just finished Kapag Langit ang Humatol with Laurice Guillen at the helm. At the PMPC Star Awards for TV, Vilma’s show harvested the biggest awards. And on that particular rainy night at the jam packed Metropolitan Theater, Vilma Santos was paying tribute to a Movie Queen she loved dearly and who reciprocated that love. Amalia Fuentes was the special guest, who just turned 50.  Vilma! was giving her a tribute, with special appearances of former Sampaguita Productions ’stars.’

Everybody knew that despite the infamous Romeo Vasquez/Vilma Santos le-affair Amalia and Vilma remained the best of friends.  With a sincere, charismatic and humble La Vilma, who could resist her charm?  Yes, the original Taray Queen, forceful and outspoken former queen of Philippine movies, she with a strong personality but with the most beautiful face in Philippine cinema, acquiesced to her friend’s request to grace the most watched TV show.   Love begets love. Respect begets respect.  The retired and reclusive Amalia Fuentes could not say no to the current darling of Philippine movies.

To recall, the senior and junior movie queens appeared in these movies: Bulaklak at Paru-paro (1970), Mga Reynang Walang Trono(1976) and Asawa Ko, Huwag Mong Agawin (1986).   Amalia directed Vilma’s episode in Mga Reyna and agreed to second billing to Vilma in Asawa Ko.   No doubt about it, Amalia Muhlach Sumilang Fuentes, is a Vilmanian.  To seal their sisterhood and camaraderie, Vilma is Ninang to Liezl Martinez and to the latter’s son Alfonso.   Why, Liezl even sang a song ’’Wind Beneath My Wings’ to her surprised mother that night which drove the strong-willed and still beautiful Amalia to tears.  A Kodak moment, indeed.  Priceless! While interviewing the three Muhlach generations, Fuentes, Liezl and young daughter Aliyanna, Amalia revealed to Vilma that she is protective of her ’unica hija’ Liezl.  “Ay naku, I think I also have become like my Mom, I’m also very protective of my children,” Liezl remarks.

Ex-Sampaguita stars Luis Gonzales and German Moreno served as Vilma’s co-hosts who provided comic relief as they recalled their Sampaguita days with Amalia Fuentes.  Debonair Eddie Gutierrez also came to greet Amalia a Happy Birthday.  Then Daisy Romualdez, Amalia’s contemporary and best friend danced the mambo/cha-cha with dancing queen Vilma, along with Kuya Germs and Luis Gonzalez. “I messed up that dance number,” Daisy gamely confesses, “wala kasing practice.” On her friend Nena (Amalia), Daisy admires her colleague for being frank and outspoken like her. “Nagkasundo kami kaagad dahil pareho kaming prangka ni Nena, hindi kami plastik,” she bemuses.

The highlight of the evening was when Vilma introduced another special guest, the other Queen of Philippine movies, Amalia’s rival, Ms. Susan Roces. Radiant and regal in her Susan Roces hairdo and dark, glossy gown, Ms. Roces was polite and generous with her comments on her kumare-rival.  Vilma, obviously starstruck, throws a question to Susan: “What can you say about Ate Nena as being mataray and you Ate Susan as soft-spoken?”  Susan: “I’d like to make a correction Vi, Amalia is not mataray, she is just outspoken, pero nasa lugar, so there’s a difference there.”  Applause from the audience.  “Alam mo ba Vi na my mother dotes on Amalia dahil pareho silang prangka?  Sabi ng Mommy ko, iyang si Susan hindi pumaris kay Amalia, prangka at di iyakin.”

Amalia on Susan: “I want to be like Susan dahil she is so sweet and soft-spoken.  Doon nga sa weekly sessions namin, sabi ni Doctor Perez, why don’t you be like Susan, matiyaga sa fans, ikaw, sumakit lang ang ulo mo, ayaw mo nang harapin ang fans.” Guffaws and chuckles.  The conversation turns serious.  Vilma: “How did you handle the competition? Did the intrigues get in your way, affected you?”  Susan, smiling sweetly, with a politically correct comment: “Hindi naman. We were in the same movie company and we were treated fairly.  We’re like one big family.  In your case with Nora, and Gloria Romero and Nida Blanca, it’s different.  Magka-iba kayo ng movie companies.”  Vilma: “Ay ang sarap, sana, one of these days magksama rin kami ni Nora Aunor like this one, Ate Susan and Ate Nena, together.”

Amalia Fuentes, Susan Roces and Vilma Santos.  Isang Gabi, Tatlong Reyna. – Susan, a movie queen, honoring a rival-friend movie queen Amalia on her 50th. birthday.   Amalia confessed on the show and thanked Susan for throwing a surprise birthday party for her days before the Vilma show.  What’s love got to do with it?  In the case of Susan and Amalia, it’s love.  In the case of Vilma and Amalia, it’s also love. Diva to diva. Competitors can be friends.  May it also happen to Vilma Santos and Nora Aunor.  Rivals on the silver screen, friends for life.   A fter all, love conquers all.  It is more permanent than fleeting fame and fortune.  What’s Love Got To Do With It?  Isang Gabi Tatlong Reyna – Mario O. Garces, V Magazine

Filmography: Bulaklak at Paru-paro (1970)

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Basic Information: Screenplay and Direction Emmanuel H. Borlaza; Cast: Amalia Fuentes, Eddie Gutierrez, Vilma Santos, Edgar Mortiz, Johnny Delgado, Alvaro Muhlach, Ernie White and The Reycard Duet/ Also Starring Jose Padilla, Jr., Romeo Rivera, Jose garcia, Patria Plata, Venchito Galvez, Edgar Garcia, Al Quinn Dancers and the Folklorico Filipino Dance Co./ Featuring Anna Lissa and Rosanna/ Guest singers- Merci Molina, Ric Manrique, Jr.; Story: Manolo Bueno; Choreography: Al Quinn; Music: Danny Holmsen; Production Company: AM Productions; Release Date: February 26, 1970/ Center; Screening Location: Center Theatre, Manila, Philippines; Film Poster Archived: Video48

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Accomplishment: The first film of Vilma Santos and Amalia Fuentez together. The other films are: “Mga Reynang Walang Trono” and “Asawa Ko Huwag Mong Agawin.”

Film Review: Citation needed for this film. IMDB listed this film under both 1970 where VSR wasn’t even mentioned and in year 1972 where Vilma Santos was the only person credited. Meanwhile, Wikipedia mentioned this film under year 1971 on its filmography section. Adding to the confusion is whether this film also featured Edgar Mortiz. We’re going to cite 1970 as the year this film was made since Eric Nadurata’s SFAS site listed this film on this year.

“…To recall, the senior and junior movie queens appeared in these movies: Bulaklak at Paru-paro (1970), Mga Reynang Walang Trono (1976) and Asawa Ko, Huwag Mong Agawin (1986). Amalia directed Vilma’s episode in Mga Reyna and agreed to second billing to Vilma in Asawa Ko. No doubt about it, Amalia Muhlach Sumilang Fuentes, is a Vilmanian. To seal their sisterhood and camaraderie, Vilma is Ninang to Liezl Martinez and to the latter’s son Alfonso…” – Mario O. Garces, V Magazine Issue Nos 6 (READ MORE)

“…Bulaklak At Paru-Paro (February 26, 1970), “the most anticipated reunion of your favorite loveteam!…” ang handog ng AM Productions na pinangunahan nina Vi, Edgar Mortiz, Amalia Fuentes, Eddie Gutierrez, Johnny Delgado, Alvaro Muhlach, Ernie White, Jose Padilla Jr., Romeo Rivera, Patria Plata, Reycards, Merci Molina, Ric Manrique, Jr. at Anna Lissa Sumilang sa panulat ni Manolo Bueno, iskrip at direksiyon ni Emmanuel H. Borlaza…” – Alfonso Valencia (READ MORE)


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Filmography: De Colores (1968)

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Basic Information: Directed: Armando Garces; Story: Romeo N. Galang; Screenplay: Romeo N. Galang; Cast: Joseph Estrada, Amalia Fuentes, Leopoldo Salcedo, Gloria Romero, Jun Aristorenas, Divina Valencia, Mario Montenegro, Perla Bautista, Anna Gonzales, Eddie Garcia, Mila Ocampo, Paquito Diaz, Von Serna, Eddie Infante, Gil de Leon, Jose De Villa, Jose Vergara, Luis Castro, Vilma Santos; Executive producer: Rey Ylag; Original Music: Restie Umali; Cinematography: Fortunato Bernardo

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: 1968 FAMAS Best Actor – Eddie Garcia; 1968 FAMAS Nomination Best Actress – Perla Bautista; 1968 FAMAS Nomination Best Director – Armando Garces; 1968 FAMAS Nomination Best Picture

Film Review: “…Ipinanganak nga marahil si Ma. Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos sa show business dahil sa pagitan ng taping ng “Larawan..” ay nagkasunod-sunod na ang kanyang mga pelikula…“De Colores” ng Arco-Iris (Marso 30 – April 10, 1968)…hanggang “Young Love” ng VP Enero 1 – 21, 1970) ng lumikha ng rekord sa takilya….Makalipas ang mga tatlong buwan, nakatanggap ng maikling sulat si Mama Santos muka lay G. Agra. Naghahanap ang Sampaguita Picutures ng batang babae na gaganap ng mahalagang papel sa “Anak, Ang Iyong Ina!” at isinali ng amain ang pangalan ni Vi. Hindi puwedeng lumiban si Papa Santos sa pinpasukang government office, at ayaw naman nilang mapahiya ang kamag-anak, kaya napilitan si Mama Santos na humingi ng day=off sa opisina (Aguinaldo’s). Pagdating sa studio, wala si G. Agra at nasa location shooting, ngunit totoong naroroon ang pangalan ni Vi, kaya’t pinapasok sila sa tanggapan. Napadaan sa harapan ni Mama Santos si Bella Flores na dala ang script ng “Trudis Liit.” Nagulumihanan si Mama Santos. Binasa niyang muli ang liham ni G. Agra. Mali yata ang napuntahan nila! Akma niyang tatawagin si Vi na noon ay nkikipaglaro sa iba pang mga bata upang yayain na itong umuwi, nang pumasok sina Mommy Vera, Dr. at Mrs. Perez, at Eddie Garcia. At doon nagsimula ang movie career ni Vi na magpahanggang ngayon ay batbat pa rin ng iba’t ibang panunuri, opinyon at konklusiyon…” – Ched P. Gonzales (READ MORE)

“…An all-star cast flick with such superstars as Joseph Estrada, Amalia Fuentes, and Gloria Romero. Despite multiple episodic stories of this movie about the “cult” “religious” revival among the elite Catholics, Vilma was in a forgettable episode. I wasn’t sure if she played a rebellious daughter turned good via the Cursillo, and whether she shared scenes with Ms. Romero. What mattered was that she bumped into her Tita Gloria on the set. More bonding, please…” – Mario O. Garces (READ MORE)

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