Golden Ging (Videos and Music)

FILMS - Golden Ging (1964 - 2014)

Released Date: 20 January 1964

Basic Information: Directed: Cirio H. Santiago, Teodorico C. Santos; Story: Mars Ravelo; Screenplay: Teodorico C. Santos; Cast: Vilma Santos, Jose Padilla Jr., Olivia Cenizal, Carol Varga, Ramon D’Salva, Aruray, Etang Discher, Georgie Quizon, Ponga, Jose Garcia, Paquito Salcedo, Eva Montes, Marvin Molina, Pol Todd; Executive producer: Adela Santiago; Cinematography: Lito Padrino; Film Editing: Demetrio De Santos; Production Design: Bert Amazar; Theme Songs: “Ulila” composed by Levi Celerio, performed by Vilma Santos

Plot Description: Ging is a poignant story of a poor gifted girl, trying to make both ends meet by singing and dancing in crowded streets and cafeterias. – Komiklopedia (READ MORE)

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In Appreciation of Mars Ravelo

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Mars Ravelo (born October 9, 1916 in Tanza, Cavite, Philippines – September 12, 1988) was a Filipino graphic novelist who created the characters Darna, Dyesebel, Captain Barbell, Lastikman, Bondying, Varga, Wanted: Perfect Mother, Hiwaga, Maruja, Mariposa, Roberta, Rita, Buhay Pilipino, Jack and Jill, Flash Bomba, Tiny Tony, and Dragonna among others. He started out as a cartoonist, then as a writer, and later on as editor -in- chief for two publications houses and for several film companies. He later established his own company, RAR. Ravelo created the characters of Darna the super heroine, Dyesebel the love-lorn mermaid, and Captain Barbel the super hero, Facifica Falayfay, and the duo of Jack & Jill. He also created the drama about a young orphaned girl named Roberta for Sampaguita Pictures. Ravelo wrote the movie adaptation of Alicia Vergel’s Basahang Ginto. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

Style of Drawing – “…In my interviews, Ravelo revealed that “sa abot ng natatandaan ko” (as far as I can remember), his first published works were “Ponchong” and “Bemboy.” And had not Liwayway magazine turned him down on his Varga (Darna’s predecessor character), history would have put Darna’s origin inside Liwayway’s pages instead of Bulaklak, and she would have been the Philippines’ first komiks superhero (Yes, at least one-a-half years ahead of Wonder Woman’s first comics appearance!)…Varga is another casing point of Ravelo’s early style of drawing. True to his accounts, Varga’s illustration is a cross between McManus and Fleischer. And based on his story, the timeline of Varga should be put around 1939 and not 1947. To quote Ravelo: “Alam mo naisip kong gawin yung Varga para itapat kay Superman. Lalake yung sa mga Amerikano, babae yung sa atin. Di ba ayos?” (You know I thought of creating Varga as a counterpart of Superman. Male on the part of the Americans, female on our part. Isn’t that okay?). It can also be noted that Varga was a character archived twice. By some twist of circumstance, the name Varga became the ownership of Bulaklak magazine (during those times, intellectual property right is not yet in effect) and when Ravelo left the publication in 1949 after a falling out with its editor, Varga stayed behind. Ravelo took Varga’s personality, revised her costume, and brought her to Pilipino Komiks, and renamed the character Darna. For more than six decades the character Varga was lost, never again to be seen until ABS-CBN Channel 2 made it into a TV series which started on August 2, 2008. The character portrayed by Mariel Rodriguez, however, was very different from the original creation of Ravelo. The superheroine’s costume was change, as well as her origin and beginning. The name of her alter ego was also change – from Narda to Olga…” – Ernee Lawagan (READ MORE)

Number One Janitor – “…Only a very few know that Mars is Marcial, but 20,000,000 komiks readers will swear that Ravelo is one of the greatest things that ever happened to the local komiks industry. For his were the ideas and innovations that defied what were then regarded as “sacred institutions” in the profession and influenced the course of the komiks industry in the Philippines. Oddly enough, Ravelo’s initial foray into the local komiks field was for a man of lesser guts extremely discouraging. It would have been more than enough for the average neophyte to call it quits. But Ravelo is made of the stuff that makes champions. The young (33) Ravelo that confidently presented his first cartoon strip to a vernacular magazine editor that fine day in 1949 was already a “fighter”. He was then drifting from one low-paying menial job to another but even then, his innate desire to excel was evident. When he was a janitor, he says, he was “number one janitor”. He was also to say many years later in a magazine interview that he became “number one” in the komiks field because “I’ve always hated to be number two!” At that time, he already knew that he could write and draw well – as a matter of fact, “better than most of those already in the komiks profession.” But the magazine editor apparently did not think so; one quick glance at the comic strip presented by Ravelo and he pronounced the death sentence: “Hindi pa puwede!” (Not good enough)….” – Komiklopedia (READ MORE)

Mass Culture – “…To understand Darna is to understand Filipino mass culture. Created in 1949 by Mars Ravelo, Darna has zoomed in and out of the imagination of three generation of Filipinos. Darna, who is the local hybrid version of Wonder Woman and Supergirl first appeared in the Pilipino Komiks in the late 40’s. Nestor Redondo, considered by many in his profession as one of the unsung heroes of Filipino illustrations, gave graphic life to the original Filipina libber then named Varga. Over the years Darna has appeared and re-appeared in so many episodes, that Ravelo himself forgets the exact number, to do battle against a wide and weird array of baddies, from Valentina who sports a Medusa-like coiffure and the Babaeng Lawin to the impakta and engkantados, creatures unique to the Filipino’s supernatural hierarchy. Darna symbolizes the two principal characteristics of our mass culture: the supernatural powers that allows a great number of people to engage in never ending fights of fantasy and the dormant militance, the latent commitment to fight injustice wherever it can be found. But above all, Darna is the concrete expression of the cultural schizophrenia that besets us. The superheroine’s creater, Mars Ravelo, really admits that it was the prevalence of a colonial mentality among many readers that compelled him to create a comic strip hero that approximated the stature and powers of the then most popular American heroes, Wonder Woman and Supergirl. Ravelo says, “Naisip ko noon, gayong sikat sina Wonder Woman at Supergirl, bakit hindi ako gumawa ng isang karakter na may mga powers na katulad ng mga ito at ilagay sa situwasyong Pilipino.” Indeed this tendency to go along with trends set in America was and still is true for many comics strip writers. Ravelo, however, had more than mere imitation and lumping into the superhero bandwagon in mind. Ravelo goes on, “Naiisip ko kasi noon since nadito na rin lang yang colonial mentality why not work around it. Kaya naman kung mapapansin nin’yo I try to inject certain amount of relevance to Darna’s adventures. For one thing she talks, thinks, and feels in the vernacular. She exhibits idiosyncrasies that are distinctly Filipino and she fights characters that are unique to the Filipino milieu. Besides the kinds of conflict that she gets involved in and the caused she fights for are those that masses themselves can identify with.” Like all superheroes, however, Darna is one of the best examples of escapist entertainment. Even Ravelo admits to this when he says, “I don’t like writing fantasy. Pero anong magagawa ko? I personally would like to write about real, down-to-earth characters and situations. But the masses just won’t but that! Kasi, kahit na mataas nga ang literacy level ng mga Pilipino alam natin na functional literacy lang ito. Huwag lang masabing ‘no read no write…” – Bill Davidson, TV Times March 13 – 19 1977

Darna is Not a ‘Rip-off” of Wonder Woman – “…Because of the character’s immense popularity, several other studios would license the character and produce more Darna movies throughout the next several decades. After Rosa Del Rosario, Vilma Santos (who first played Darna in 1973’s “Lipad, Darna, Lipad”) would be the most well known and the most in demand to play the character. She starred in a total of 4 Darna movies. Her 4th and final one being in 1980. For years after that, no more Darna movies were produced…” – Raffy Arcega, Comic Book Movie (READ MORE)

Mars Ravelo and Vilma Santos

Ging is a poignant story of a poor gifted girl, trying to make both ends meet by singing and dancing in crowded streets and cafeterias. – Komiklopedia

“…Even at the early age, it was clear that she was already brimming with talent. Vilma, apparently, was born into this world to perform, entertain and make people happy. She was utterly convincing in the dramatic scenes and thoroughly graceful in her musical numbers. Listang-lista – as we’d say in the vernacular. Even then, she was already living up to her showbiz title of “Star for All Seasons” because her performance in “Ging” is not only brilliant, but timeless as well…” – Butch Francisco, People’s Journal 04 March 1999 (READ MORE)

Trudis Liit (lit. Little Trudis) is a Philippine drama produced by GMA Network, and part of that station’s Sine Novela series. Trudis Liit marks the 21st and final installment of the Sine Novela series based on the works by Mars Ravelo. Like all Sine Novela installments, Trudis Liit is based on a movie; this one made in 1963, starring Lolita Rodriguez, Luis Gonzales, Bella Flores and Vilma Santos. – Wikipedia

“…Makulit na ako no’ng time na ‘yon! So, anyway, tinawag ako ni Doc Perez [of Sampaguita Pictures] at that time. Pinaarte ako. Nag-adlib-adlib pa ako. Nakuha naman ako. So, when I started, dalawa kaagad ang pelikula ko—Trudis Liit at Anak, Ang Iyong Ina [1963]. Ang naaalala ko lang tungkol sa maaga kong pagpasok sa pag-aartista, parang laro lang sa akin iyon. Parang naglalaro lang ako noon kaya hindi trabaho sa akin iyon, e. So, very-very memorable sa akin iyon. At saka no’ng Trudis Liit, every lunch, lagi akong may apple. Lagi akong may chicken. Every lunch talaga ‘yon…” – Vilma Santos (READ MORE)

Darna is a fictional character and Filipino comics superheroine created by writer Mars Ravelo and artist Nestor Redondo. In her more popular incarnations, she is a deceased warrior from another planet manifesting herself through a girl from Earth, named Narda. She first appeared in Pilipino Komiks #77 (May 13, 1950). Darna is a retooling of Ravelo’s earlier character Varga, whose stories he wrote and illustrated himself. She first appeared in Bulaklak Magazine, Volume 4, #17 (July 23, 1947). Ravelo left Bulaklak due to differences with the editors. – Wikipedia

“…Ding, ang bato!” yells Narda, the adolescent country lass, to her younger brother. Ding obligingly hands over a shiny pebble which Narda swallows to turn herself into the vivacious super-vixen, Darna. Mars Ravelo’s superheroine, clad in crimson bikinis and knee-high stiletto boots, may perhaps be the most famous local fantasy character given life on the silver screen. Though not actually considered a career-defining role, portraying Darna is, nonetheless, highly-coveted. Darna has been portrayed by no less than nine actress in 12 feature films. Rosa del Rosario first wore the scarlet two piece in May 1951. She reprised the role after three months. Liza Moreno, Eva Montes and Gina Pareno followed her. The inter-galactic pebble found its way to Vilma Santos’ throat in 1973 via the flick “Lipad, Darna, Lipad!” Santos, now a two-term mayor of Lipa City in Batangas, is probably the most popular Darna, with a total of four movies in a span of seven years…” – Armin Adina, Philippine Daily Inquirer, June 06, 2003 (READ MORE)

Dyesebel is a popular mermaid character in the Philippines. The comic book character was originally conceived by the Filipino comic book illustrator, Mars Ravelo. Dyesebel is a prominent character in Philippine cinema and television. – Wikipedia

“…In the 1973 Dyesebel movie, Dyesebel lives in an undersea kingdom of mermaids far from the land of humans because the humans believe that the mermaids are the cause of misfortune. Dyesebel fell in love with a male human being. In order to be with the man that she likes, she swore to find a way to be transformed into a female human being. In the movie, “Si Dyesebel at Ang Mahiwagang Kabibe,” the role of Dyesebel was played by Vilma Santos and Fredo was played by Romeo Miranda…” (READ MORE)

Related Reading:

Special Film: Ging

“…Ging (1964) was directed by Cirio Santiago and Teodorico Santos. Although it was made in the old-fashioned way of making films (the flashback scenes in particular), the material used here is timeless – especially since there are more street children in our midst now more than ever. As far as the showbiz scene is concerned, there are still a lot of heartless impresarios today exploiting young talents in the business. But what really made “Ging” a delight to watch was the performance of the very young Vilma Santos. Even at the early age, it was clear that she was already brimming with talent. Vilma, apparently, was born into this world to perform, entertain and make people happy. She was utterly convincing in the dramatic scenes and thoroughly graceful in her musical numbers. Listang-lista – as we’d say in the vernacular. Even then, she was already living up to her showbiz title of “Star for All Seasons” because her performance in “Ging” is not only brilliant, but timeless as well…” – Butch Francisco, People’s Journal 04 March 1999 (READ MORE)

Source: gobitz69

FAIR USE NOTICE (NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE): This site contains copyrighted materials the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to preserve the film legacies of actress, Vilma Santos, and to make her career information available to future generations. We believe this is NOT an infringement of any such copyrighted materials as in accordance to the the fair dealing clauses of both the Canadian and U.S. Copyright legislation, both of which allows users to engage in certain activities relating to research, private study, criticism, review, or news reporting. We are making an exerted effort to mention the source of the material, along with the name of the author, performer, maker, or broadcaster for the dealing to be fair, again in accordance with the allowable clauses. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

Remembering Aruray

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Aruray ni Dolphy – “…Aruray pala ang binansag ni Mang Dolphy kay Pokwang. Ito ay ikinuwento ni Pokwang sa preskon ng The Healing kung saan si Governor Vilma Santos ang bida. Aru kung tawagin ni Mang Dolphy si Pokwang. Sino nga ba si Aruray? Siya po ang komedyante noong araw na matagal na ring namayapa. Kahawig nga ni Pokwang si Aruray pero siyempre mas maganda si Pokwang, in all fairness. Bumunghalit ng tawa si Governor Vi nang marinig ang kuwento ni Pokwang na binansagan siyang Aru ni Mang Dolphy. Hindi naman makapag-react si Kim Chiu dahil hindi niya kilala si Aruray. Hindi pa yata siya ipinanganak nang mamatay si Aruray…” – Joe Barrameda (READ MORE)

“…In 1998 while she was working in Abu Dhabi, Pokwang received the sad news that her son died of a congenital brain ailment. “Of course, I felt guilty na wala man lang ako sa tabi ng anak ko nang kailangang-kailangan niya ako,” admitted Pokwang, the wacky comedienne (suspected to be the “reincarnation” of Aruray) who in real life is a serious mother. She changed moods from sadly reflective to hilariously comedic. “Shin was made in the Philippines, pero assembled by a Japanese. I met his father here before I went to Japan. Magulo ang relasyon namin. Away kami nang away, nagbabatuhan kami ng kung anu-ano, nagsasakitan kami talaga, that’s why the baby inside me was badly affected. Kawawa naman siya. When the baby was born, kami ng ama niya nagbabatuhan kami ng crib.” Ria Mae was also sired by a Japanese whom Pokwang met in Japan where she worked as a dancer. “I never lived with my children’s fathers,” Pokwang said. “Nabuntis lang nila ako…” – Ricardo F. Lo (READ MORE)

Sa Kabukiran – “…I did several shows before I was given my first regular show on ABS-CBN in 1961, Sa Kabukiran, produced by Atty. Narciso Pimentel,” Luz continues. “It was one of the top 10 shows in the ratings during the ’60s. It was a musical comedy where I was paired with Luis Gonzales and we had Bentot, Cachupoy and Aruray with us. We were dressed in Filipiniana costumes singing Tagalog songs, doing comedy skits, and dancing local folk dances. It ran for 12 years until martial law was declared and ABS-CBN was closed, so we moved to GMA 7, which was allowed to continue airing. The show became Basta Ikaw Mahal which ran for seven years. At the same time, I had a noontime show, Kuwentong Kutsero, also on GMA, that ran for four years. For a while, I also co-hosted another noontime variety show, Darigold Jamboree. I had the chance to work with the late Ading Fernando in the sitcom, Apartment 153-A, which ran for four years at ABS-CBN. I am really so blessed because I was never ran out of TV shows. For a while, I retired and went to the US. But then, I got another call from GMA 7, asking me to come back to play the role of Bong Revilla’s mother in the sitcom, Idol Ko Si Kap, which is now going on for three years and rating very well…” – Mario E. Bautista (READ MORE)

Pamosong Komedyante – “…Samantala sa entablado naman ng mga eskuwelahan at sa mga syudad, ipinalabas din ang dulang New Yorker in Tondo, isang komedya tungkol sa isang balikbayan na mas Amerikano pa kaysa Amerikano pero kayumanggi naman. Nauso rin sa radyo ang komedya tulad ng Sebya Mahal Kita na pinalabasan nina Sylvia Guerrero at Eddie San Jose. Ang iba pang pamosong mga komedyante ay sina Oscar Obligacion, Chichay at Aruray atbp…Sa larangan ng pelikula, si Ai-Ai pa rin ang bida sa mga komedya, na marahil ay namana ang kanyang pagiging komedyante sa mga “greats” tulad ni Chichay at Aruray na sumikat noong mga 50’s at hanggang 60’s. Bandang 70’s o 80’s ginawang katatawanan ang isang artista na sobra ang dunong daw…” – Wilhelmina S. Orozco (READ MORE)

Faux Ballet Dances – “…The field of comedy is basically dominated by men. To my surprise, however, I had difficulty paring down my list of best comediennes to just 10. Maybe woman empowerment encouraged female comic talents to shine starting in the ’80s and this continues to the present day. But who gets on the list? Below is the first installment…Thin like a stick, I don’t know where she got all that energy performing on stage (I never got to see that though), on TV and in the movies. But her faux ballet dances (she had classical ballet training if I’m not mistaken) were very funny. Always cast as the impertinent atsay (she was supposed to have played Virgin Mary in a Lenten play once though), my favorite among her films was when she played aspiring movie star in Sampaguita Pictures’ mega production of The Big Broadcast. In the story, Aruray and Chichay are sisters and they have a stage mother in Patsy who believes her two daughters are the loveliest in the world and that they should be cast in a picture in lieu of Susan Roces and Amalia Fuentes. Although everyone turned in a hilarious performance, I liked Aruray best and I will always put her on my best comediennes list. Unfortunately, after she died in the early ’90s, who remembers Aruray now?…” – Butch Francisco (READ MORE)

Aruray was a famous Filipina comedian of the Philippines. She made many movies produced by her home studio Sampaguita Pictures. Born in 1920, she is one of the most successful comedians of the 1950s and 1960s. She was once nominated as Best Supporting Actress in the movie Torkwata. – Wikipilipinas (READ MORE)

Aruray and Vilma Santos

Aruray and Vilma Santos’ first movie together was King and Queen for A Day (which was also Vilma’s first film with Dolphy and Chichay) in 1963. This was Vi’s first year in show business and as a child star. She followed this up with Ging the following year. Then after almost six year, now a teen star, Vilma joined Aruray and another comedian, Dely Atay-atayan in Mga Batang Bangketa. After this film, the two did three films as guest star. There is no detail Information about Aruray’s exact date and cause of death, only the year – 1988.

Candy (1980) – “…Sheryl Cruz has appeared with Vilma before in Candy (Vilma in a cameo role) and Good Morning Sunshine (1980) directed by Ishmael Bernal. Mano Po 3 is their third film together…” – The 28th (READ MORE)

Mga Mata ni Angelita (1978) – “…Julie Vega was only 10 years old when she was launched to full stardom in the 1978 movie, “Mga mata ni Angelita.” She appeared in previous movie outings as Darling Postigo. The young Vega was ably supported by an all super star cast headed by the King of Philippine Movies, Fernando Poe, Jr. (in the role of Conrado, the ex-convict) and Comedy King Dolphy (as Tacio, the taho vendor). Also appearing in cameo roles were Joseph Estrada (as himself as Mayor); Nora Aunor (a metro-aide sweeper); Vilma Santos ( as a worried wife); Ramon Revilla (as barrio captain); Alma Moreno (as a jealous sweetheart); Christopher de Leon (as the lover) and many more…” – Simon Santos (READ MORE)

Big Ike’s Happening (1976) – “…Enrique “Big Ike” Lozada (August 13, 1940-March 8, 1995) was a Filipino comedian, actor and TV host. He was born on August 13, 1940 in Iloilo City. He started acting at the age of 11 on the movie Mga Bituin ng Kinabukasan with the younger Susan Roces. He died on March 10, 1995 in Manila, of heart attack. He was 54. His had lain at Manila Memorial Park in Parañaque City…” – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

Mga Batang Bangketa (1970) – “…By late 1969, movie producers had been tapping a Vilma Santos-Edgar Mortiz love team. Edgar was a Tawag ng Tanghalan winner. They started to be together in the movies, My Darling Eddie (1969) and The Jukebox King (1969)…In 1970, the love team of Vilma Santos and Edgar “Bobot” Mortiz was officially launched in the movie Young Love, together with the another popular love team during that time, Nora Aunor and Tirso Cruz III. The Vi and Bot love team went on to do 14 more movies in 1970—The Young Idols, Songs and Lovers, Sweethearts, Sixteen, Love Letters, Love is for the Two of Us, Mga Batang Bangketa, My Pledge of Love, Renee Rose, Baby Vi, Because You Are Mine, Edgar Loves Vilma, From the Bottom of My Heart, and I Love You Honey. All did well at the box-office…” – Rommel R. Llanes (READ MORE)

Ging (1964) – “…Listang-lista at ang husay ni Vilma rito. Naroong kumanta siya (the voice over seemed like her singing voice), sumayaw at nagdrama. Luma si Madonna doon sa isang parang La Isla Bonita number niya. One memorable scene was when she was singing her signature song to the audience of her longing to see her mother and her father – the camera captures her pain and agony and the deep wound she suffers from her abusers – a poignant scene, complete with tears and and a well-internalized acting…” – Mario Garces (READ MORE)

King and Queen For A Day (1963) – “…Batangas Governor Vilma Santos, who’s now identified with ABS-CBN, told the Inquirer: “The whole country is saddened by the news. He was simple but someone with a big heart for Filipinos. He entertained us for over 60 years.” The actress-politician recalled that she first shared the screen with Dolphy when she was a child star. “I worked with him and the late comedians Panchito and Chichay when I was 11 years old in the Sampaguita movie ‘King and Queen for a Day.’ That was 1963…” – Bayani San Diego Jr (READ MORE)

Related Reading:

Filmography: Ging (1964)

“Pagmasdan n’yo ako…ako po’y ulilang lubos…inaapi at hinahamak…kung hindi n’yo po kahahabagan ay nasaan ang katarungan?!” – Ging

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Basic Information: Directed: Cirio H. Santiago, Teodorico C. Santos; Story: Mars Ravelo; Screenplay: Teodorico C. Santos; Cast: Vilma Santos, Jose Padilla Jr., Olivia Cenizal, Carol Varga, Ramon D’Salva, Aruray, Etang Discher, Georgie Quizon, Ponga, Jose Garcia, Paquito Salcedo, Eva Montes, Marvin Molina, Pol Todd; Executive producer: Adela Santiago; Cinematography: Lito Padrino; Film Editing: Demetrio De Santos; Production Design: Bert Amazar; Theme Songs: “Ulila” composed by Levi Celerio, performed by Vilma Santos

Plot Description: A young Vilma Santos starred as Ging. A smart mouth street kid who have to beg for money to support her crippled mother. She was adopted by a deceitful couple who heard her sing in a restaurant. The couple made Ging into a singing sensation but abuse her, limiting her food intake and sleep to prevent her to grow. Ging eventually left them and surprisingly discovered her father. She reconciled with him and her crippled mother. – RV

Ging is a poignant story of a poor gifted girl, trying to make both ends meet by singing and dancing in crowded streets and cafeterias. – Komiklopedia (READ MORE).

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Reviews: “…Pagbalikang tanaw naman natin ngayon ang mga batang karakter sa komiks. Sila ang nagbigay aliw, kinalugdan at minahal ng mga komiks readers noon, particularly ng ating mga ina (kasama na dito ang yumao kong nanay) na siyang tumangkilik, nagbasa at sumubaybay sa kanilang mga kasaysayan. Unahin natin si GING, isang batang iniyakan ang kasaysayan at unang ipinakilala ng creator nito na si Mars Ravelo ka-tandem ang dibuhistang si Elpidio Torres sa mga pahina ng Liwayway Magazine noong 1963. Ito ay isinalin sa pelikula sa ilalim ng pamamahala nina Direk Cirio H. Santiago at Teodorico C. Santos. Si Vilma Santos ang gumanap sa title role na Ging…” – Arman Francisco, Komixpage, 28 June 2015 (READ MORE)

All Vilmanians and even those who just love watching old Tagalog movies must have been glued to their TV screens last Thursday afternoon when Channel 9’s “Premiere Pilipino Klasiks” aired “Ging”, Vilma Santos’ follow-up movie after she was introduced in Sampaguita Pictures’ “Trudis Liit.” Produced by Premiere Productions when Vilma was only 10 (circa 1963), “Ging” casts the now-Star for All Seasons (and Batangas Governor, too!) as a street child who is in charge of taking care of her invalid mother, played by Olivia Cenizal. In flashback fashion, we find out that Ms. Cenizal was once a big movie star who fell in love and married a young rich man (portrayed in the film by Jose Padilla, Jr.)

Padilla’s aristocratic mother (Etang Discher), unfortunately, breaks up the union and the two lovers go their separate ways. Vilma, as Ging, was born shortly after. While begging for food scraps from customers at the restaurant of the Chinese Ponga (I doubt if today’s generation have any idea who he is or how he looks like), she is spotted by Ramon D’Salva and his wife, Carol Varga. The couple immediately express their wish to adopt her. Vilma was hesitant at first at the idea – until she was promised by D’Salva that she would be sent to school, and her mother, to the hospital for medical treatment.

Once she is in the D’Salva home, the couple show their true colors. They exploit her by making her perform in vaudeville presentations. Although she is a hit and a top money maker, she is still badly treated by Varga. For one, she is not given proper nutrition to stunt her growth (child stars are supposed to be cute and small). Little Vilma rebels when she finds out that D’Salva does not fulfill his promise of sending her mother to the hospital for treatment. She runs away and in the process bumps into people related to her biological father. Padilla and Cenizal are reunited and the little heroine lives happily ever after with her parents.

“Ging” was directed by Cirio Santiago and Teodorico Santos. Although it was made in the old-fashioned way of making films (the flashback scenes in particular), the material used here is timeless – especially since there are more street children in our midst now more than ever. As far as the showbiz scene is concerned, there are still a lot of heartless impresarios today exploiting young talents in the business. But what really made “Ging” a delight to watch was the performance of the very young Vilma Santos. Even at the early age, it was clear that she was already brimming with talent. Vilma, apparently, was born into this world to perform, entertain and make people happy. She was utterly convincing in the dramatic scenes and thoroughly graceful in her musical numbers. Listang-lista – as we’d say in the vernacular. Even then, she was already living up to her showbiz title of “Star for All Seasons” because her performance in “Ging” is not only brilliant, but timeless as well. – Butch Francisco, People’s Journal 04 March 1999 (READ MORE)

Ang sarap balikan ng mga pelikula ng the Premier Acress of the Land. Mga pelikulang may mga temang napapanahon kahit sabihin pang luma na ang mga ito. May tatak Vilma Santos. GING (1964) – all of 11 years, here is the newly-crowned FAMAS best child actress sa isa sa mga title roles niya bilang anak ng laos na artista (Olivia Cenizal) na nalumpo after she gave birth to Ging (Vilma). Ang ama ni Ging ay isang bit player na Mama’s boy, si Jose Padilla, Jr.(SLN) whose mother is the screen’s perennial conravida, Etang Discher (SLN), mother of the late Panchito.

Padilla abandoned Ging and her mother on her mother’s wishes so he won’t be dropped from her “pamana” (will). Mother and daughter lived in a slum area. Their squalid lives are made bearable with the presence of a cantankerous neighbor Aruray and her son who was sired by a black G.I. named George. Aruray’s son is about Ging’s age. They practically were street urchins who beat the other kids in soliciting alms, thanks to Ging’s histrionics: she would fake syncope (play dead) and “kawawa” by relating her sad plight as an abandoned poor daughter with a paraplegic of a mother – through a song that would drive her audience at a restaurant to tears and pity – and would give her free food and money.

The ploy works all the time. Little did Ging realize that an unscupulous couple, racketeers Ramon D’Salva and Carol Varga were observing her in a restaurant and saw in her a goldmine: they would adopt her and make them rich as her talent manager. Talk of child exploitation. Reluctant at first, Ging agrees to go with the evil couple provided she would go to shool and that they would send her alcoholic mother (bagay na bagay ito sa isang artista) to the hospital for treatment. Of course, the evil and scheming couple reneged on their promises. They exploited Ging by forcing her to work overtime and would starve her so she wouldn’t grow up and lose her audience. Luckily, she has a guardian angel in Georgie Quizon, Dolphy’s erthswhile brother who, along with Aruray provided comic relief, and who would protect Vilma from her exploiters.

Young Vilma’s raw, innate talent surfaces most especially in her scenes where she vacllates or mulls in leaving her mother. Her final goodbye scene with her mother is heartbreaking, enough a motivation for a Vilma fan Nora Aunor in Iriga city to follow in her footsteps. “One day, I wanna be like Vilma, I will sing and make people cry. Love that “gripo” princess to death. Idol ko siya.” Shot in black and white and adapted from the comics to the screen by Mars Ravelo, the movie was directed by Cirio Santiago and Teodorico Santos.

The movie is a must have for any true blue Vilmanian. Listang-lista at ang husay ni Vilma rito. Naroong kumanta siya (the voice over seemed like her singing voice), sumayaw at nagdrama. Luma si Madonna doon sa isang parang La Isla Bonita number niya. One memorable scene was when she was singing her signature song to the audience of her longing to see her mother and her father – the camera captures her pain and agony and the deep wound she suffers from her abusers – a poignant scene, complete with tears and and a well-internalized acting. Bravo! Karapat-dapat na U.P. Gawad Plaridel Awardee – maliit pa lang ang dyaske, ang husay talaga. Sa katunayan, some scenes from Ging were included in the audio-visual presentation at both the FAMAS Hall of Fame awards and the recent U.P. Gawad Plaridel coronation of the Summa Cum Laude of All Philippine Actors. Ang galing-galing mo talaga, Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos-Recto! – Mario Garces, V magazine issue no. 6 2006 (READ MORE)

Georgie Quizon – “…Like Dolphy, Georgie started out in comedy roles. In fact, he was his brother’s follower noon pang nasa Sampaguita Studios si Dolph at isa siyang mainstay ditto. Nang minsang isinama ni Dolph si Georgie sa kanyang shooting ay namataan si Georgie ng isang direktor a binigyan ito ng bit role. He was found out to have his brother’s talent and soon, Georgie found himself in one picture after another, mostly in Susan Roces-starrers where he played her sidekick or friendly neighbor. Ito ang simula ng binyag ni Georgie sa pelikula. Naging sikat din siyang comedian. Kaya lang ang problema niya ay hindi siya makakatakas sa image at pangalan ng kanyang kapatid na lalong sikat. Kahit ano ang gawin niya ay siyempre, associated and identified siya kay Dolphy. “Ito ang malaki kong problema,” nabanggit ni Georgie sa amin. “But I also love my brother! Kung wala naman si Ompong ay sino kami, aber! Siguro, ganito ang buhay kung mayroon kang tanyag na kapatid na parehong propesyon. Kung sino ang mas sikat, iyon ang mas kilala. At ang hindi ay nananatili sa background. Tulad ko,” aniya. “Ako ang anino ni Dolphy. Hindi ako kilala sa sarili ko. Ako raw ay kapatid ni Dolphy. And never was I called my name. Kung minsan nga ay ako raw si Dolphy. Ganoon. “Kung minsan, I feel flattered. Pero kadalasan, tinatanggap ko na lamang nang basta ganoon. Kibit balikat baga. Ano pa nga ba ang magagawa ko? Kapatid ko iyon at sikat pa! “Kaya lang, I really want to be on my own. I want to be known as Georgie at hindi yung kapatid ni Dolphy. I am my won individual. Iba ako, iba siya. Nagkataon lamang na nagko-comedy rin ako. Kaya hindi talaga ako makakatakas sa kanyang anino,” pagtatapat ni Georgie….

…As a whole, wala naman siyang reklamo. Okey naman ang takbo ng kanyang showbiz career. Hindi siya nawawalan ng assignment. Tuwing Linggo, mayroon siyang TV show, nagge-guest din siya sa mga tanyag na shows at kung minsan, kumakanta siya sa mga roadshows, sa mga bases. “Para sa akin, tipong okey na ang lahat,” banggit pa ni Georgie. Everything’s fine. I am busy everyday. Malusog pa ang ermat, masasaya kaming lahat. Wala na yata akong mahihiling pa,” Georgie confessed. The other surviving brother of Dolphy and Georgie is named JIMMY, ang bunso sa lahat na hindi kailanman sumali sa showbiz. Nasa States siya ngayon at isang medical intern sa isang tanyag na ospital doon. Sampu sanang lahat sina Dolph, kaya lang tatlo na ang namatay. Sina Tessie, ang uang Jimmy na siyang pang-walo at si Melencio, Jr. na binawian ng buhay noong early 1970’s. Ang iba – sina Zony, Dolphy, Josie, Laura, Auring at Georgie – ay pawang naging showbiz folks at dalawa na lamang sa kanila ang aktibo sa pelikula. Sina Dolphy at Georgie nalamang, bagamat ang iba, sa pamamagitan ng kanilang mga anak, ay kasama pa rin sa iba’t ibang aspeto ng paggawa ng pelikula, particular na sa RVQ Productions syempre…” – Ross F. Celino, Jingle Extra Hot Movie Entertainment Magazine No. 20, June 22, 1981 (READ MORE)

“…Young and cute Vilma Santos is one of the few child stars who have hit the screen with continued success. Although not as well-publicized as the adult stars, she is gaining popularity with lot of fans who recognize her warm personality and talent. Her successful debut in Sampaguita Pictures’ Trusdis Liit gave her more movie offers. Vilma, who just turned 13 last Nov. 3, has been in the movies for three years and already has 16 pictures to her credit. A talented youngster, she often steals the spotlight from her senior colleagues. In Ging, Naligaw Na Anghel, Anak Ang Iyong Ina, and many other films, she was a standout in tear-jearking scenes. As a result, she is always in demand for such roles. Despite her success, Vilma remains unaffected as a child. At the St. mary’s Academy where she is a six-grader, she has more than her share of friends not because she is a celebrity but because of her natural chumminess. In fact, she is so fond of her friends that their house on Lunas St in La Loma, Quezon City is often filled with them. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Amado Santos, do not discourage her gregariousness and instead look upon it as part of her developing personality…Vilma’s movie commitments don’t prevent her from being a good student. She could have been easily way above average if only her shooting schedules sometimes do not prevent her from attending her classes. “Doing two tasks at the same time gave me a hard time at the beginning but I’ve adjusted to it now,” said this youngster who still goes for lollipops, ice cream, toys, and play. Vilma, who spends her leisure hours listening to radio dramas, dancing and playing with her three other sisters, will be seen in her coming films, Sigaw Ng Batingaw of Argo Productions…” – Julio F. Silverio, The Weekly Nation, 31 December 1965, reposted at Pelikula Atbp blog (READ MORE)

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