Film Review: Biktima (1974)

FILMS - BIKTIMA

Release Date: June 23, 1974 (Philippines)

The Plot: – In a strange turn of events, Dolores (Vilma Santos) moves in to live with her grandfather, who has sole custody of her ever since her mother was imprisoned for the murder of Dolores’ father. Mystery unfolds as Dolores stays with her grandfather when members of the household are murdered one by one. Will Dolores escape the chaos unraveling around her or will she be the next victim? – Kabayan Central (READ MORE)

The Reviews: – Hired by Don Rafael Valdez (Joe Sison), Attorney Andrade (Leopoldo Salcedo) finally convinced Dolores (Vilma Santos) to live with her rich grandfather, Don Rafael. This is despite the warning of her aunt, Tiya Dadeng (Patria Plata) and the warning of her mother, Lourdes (Perla Bautista) who is in prison. She was framed-up and wrongfully convicted of her father’s death. When Dolores came to her grandfather’s mansion, one by one, people are starting to die. This includes her grandfather’s young wife (Elizabeth Vaughn); Monica Valdez (Celia Rodriguez); Magda (Divina Valencia); the gardener (Yoyoy Villame); and Marita (Helen Gamboa). By the time the last victim died, the surprise killer was expose, the killer was Dolores. She tried to revenge her mother’s imprisonment and her father’s death. It was also revealed that her aunt’s husband (Bert Le Roy Jr.) was the one who killed her father. Her father tried to rape their grandfather’s nurse, Marita (Helen Gamboa), she fought hard and stabbed her father. Bert Leroy Jr. framed-up Dolores’ mother who was the first person on the scene of the crime. In exchange for his silence he blackmailed Marita with sexual favors. Marita didn’t know that Dolores’ father was still alive but Leroy finished the job by stabbing him more.

Written by Jose Flores Sibal with writing credit from the film’s lead star, Vilma Santos, Biktima was surprisingly watchable. Compared to other Vilma Santos films that Nilo Saez directed like Kampanerang Kuba, he did a convincing job in ironing out the many characters of the film (maybe except for Divina Valencia’s role who was one of the first to die). This is perhaps due to the excellent cast. The one who stands out more were Celia Rodriguez and Helen Gamboa. Both gave subdued performances. Edgar Mortiz’ role as assistant investigator was just to appeal to the loyal festival followers of Vi and Bot. By this time, it was clear that Vilma’s career are heading upward while Mortiz was heading to a different path. The ending of the film, showing a bald Vilma Santos in preparation for her demise was the film’s dramatic highlight.

FILM REVIEW: Kampanerang Kuba’s religious rituals and miracles

Kampanerang Kuba started with Andang (Vilma Santos), a hunch back bell-ringer running away from the people in the market. She was accuse of stealing. When she got back from the church (where she lives and work), she was confronted and physically assaulted by Tateng (Celia Rodriguez) for no justifiable reason. Thankfully, Father Damian, the old sick priest intervened. He has long been her protector. Andang felt sad when she found out that Father Damian is leaving. On his absence, a young priest, Father Agaton (Edgar Mortiz) will take over. Aside from ringing the bell, Andang clean and feed the piglets (owned by Ellen and Tateng, they are the church’s caretakers). She normally eats with her bare hands while talking to her patron saint, Saint Martin. She talks and treats the idol along side the church’s bell towers like they are humans. Meanwhile, Tateng, the daughter of the head caretaker, Ellen (Patria Plata), is a sex maniac who loves to abuse Andang. She also seduce men in exchange of material things like jewelry.

One time Andang caught Tateng having sex with Crispin (Dindo Fernando) inside the church, when Tateng found out that she was around, she physically abuse her. Then the following day, while feeding the piglets, Tateng verbally abuse her. Andang retaliate and the two had mud-wrestling inside pig pen. Tateng’s mother Ellen was about to join the fight when Father Agaton arrived and intervened. The next day, a group of women arrived and accused Tateng of accepting gifts from their husband that they own. When Tateng overheard the loud complaints, she quickly went to Andang and pretended she wanted to make amends and gave her a necklace. When the group of women finally faced Tateng, she lied and told them to look for the jewelry at Andang.

The women then went to Andang and accused her of stealing. Afraid of her safety, Andang went to the church’s roof telling them that if they will not stop, she will jump. Tateng convinced Andang not to jump and that she is her friend. The trusting Andang came back and was welcome by the women with physical assaults. They tied her down with a long rope and dragged her on the ground until Crispin, who riding the horse (where Andang was tied down) reached the town’s mountain hill where he threw Andang’s lifeless body. When Andang miraculously regained consciousness, she was seen talking to her patron saint, Saint Martin. He blessed her and was able to bring her back to the church. There, she was blessed by the Virgin Mary. A holy miracle happened, flower petals falls down from the sky and holy lights beams Andang. She slowly changed from the ugly hunch back girl into a beautiful woman. As turned out she became Sandra Belmonte. A woman long gone and who were once the topic of town gossips. Sandra’s two sister found her into the church the next day. Surprised and very thankful, they brought her back to their big home. Andang now assumed the identity of Sandra. Sandra as it turned out has suitor, Roel (Ernie Garcia) who she didn’t like. She also discovered that she missed her life as Andang and now sure that she is in love with Father Agaton.

Can’t control her feelings anymore, she went to the church for the Catholic ritual of confession. And with Father Agaton, she confess her love for him. Tateng overheard this, and coerced the priest to have sex with her in exchange for her silence but failed. In retaliation, she spread this information to the town’s people. Headed by Tateng’s admirer, Max Alvarado, the priest was confronted by the angry people. The priest denied the affair. The town’s people decided to tied the priest into a post and burn him. This is because the priest doesn’t want leave the church. When Sandra who was with Roel, discovered what was happening, she luckily escape madness and went inside the church to pray to Saint Martin. Her pray were answered by the sudden ringing of the church’s bells followed by a loud thunder. It started to rain killing the fire and saving the poor priest. It was a miracle. Tateng’s sinful mind cleared and she ask Father Agaton’s forgiveness, who gladly obliged. Father Agaton then search for Sandra when her suitor Roel appeared. They both went to the church tower and saw Andang instead. The end.

Kampanerang Kuba’s convoluted long story maybe attributed to the original comics material written by Pablo Gomez. A good director should iron out all the unbelievable plots specially all the one-dimensional characters. For example, Celia Rodriguez character, Tateng. She is so masochistic that viewer might wonder why she is so mean. Also, with her tower-nesque beauty, why she decided to remained in a town where everything seems to be so trivial and everyone seems loves to gossip, even the men. Nilo Saez (with Jose Flores Sibal wrote the script) failed miserably in this regard. Shot in Nagcarlan Laguna, Kampanerang Kuba showcased the old Filipino beliefs in patron saints, religious rituals and miracles. It also demonstrates that people can be so cruel, can passed judgement, and can asked for forgiveness that quick when confronted with truth. All will be forgiving without taking into account all the harm that they have done. In the real world, these people will be punished. Celia Rodriguez seems to be wooden in so many scenes but equally infuriating when she started to do her verbal and physical abuse of Andang. With limited dialogue, a young Dindo Fernando portrayed Tateng’s lover convincingly. All the other supporting roles including Perla Bautista, Ernie Garcia and others gave forgettable performances. About the two main lead, Edgar Mortiz and Vilma Santos, both did what they can to portrayed their respective roles. Edgar Mortiz seems to be trying very hard to be effective as the priest but acting is clearly not his forte. Would this be different if Jay Ilagan did this role? Vilma Santos succeed more with her solo scenes, talking to the patron saints and the bell tower, eating with her bare hands and trying to beautify her ugly face. She appeared to be gearing up for more versatile roles that requires her not to sing but to act. – RV

RELATED READING:
Kampanerang Kuba (1974)
Pinoy Classics Review: Kampanerang Kuba (1973)

Filmography: Kampanerang Kuba (1974)

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Basic Information: Directed: Nilo Saez; Story: Pablo S. Gomez; Screenplay: Nilo Saez, Jose Flores Sibal; Cast: Vilma Santos, Edgar Mortiz, Celia Rodriguez, Dindo Fernando, Rosanna Marquez, Perla Bautista, Max Alvarado, Ernie Garcia, Tony Santos, Jr., Patria Plata, Metring David, Greg Lozano, Joaquin Fajardo, Steve Alcarado, Romy Luartes, Francisco Cruz, Carmen Romasanta, Danny Rojo, Edwin Cruz, SOS Daredevils, P I Boys; Executive producer: Espiridion Laxa; Original Music: Tito Arevalo; Cinematography: Benjamin L. Lobo

Plot Description: Kampanerang Kuba (lit. Hunchbacked Lady Bellringer) was a fantasy soap opera television series broadcast by ABS-CBN in the Philippines. It was inspired by 1973 film with same title, which was starred by Vilma Santos and Bobot Mortiz. It was tagged as Pinoy Disney. It was originally based from a comic book series written by Pablo Gomez. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

Film Achievement: Film adapted from comics written Pablo S. Gomez; Illustrated by Alex Nino for Planet Komiks, 1971; Remade into TV series in 2005 by ABS-CBN and starring Anne Curtis, Luis Manzano, Jomari Yllana with Edgar Mortiz and directed by Wenn Deramas, Andoy Ranay.

Film Review: Kampanerang Kuba’s convulated, long story maybe attributed to the original comics material of Pablo Gomez. A good director should ironed out all the twists and turns and all its one-dimenssional characters. For example, Celia Rodriguez character, Tateng. She is so masochistic that it is just right to know why she is so mean and that with her towernesque beauty, she decided to remained in the town where everything seems to be so tribial. Nilo Saez (with Jose Flores Sibal adapted the script) failed miserably in this regard. Shot in Nagcarlan Laguna, Kampanerang Kuba showcased the old Filipino beliefs in patron saints, religious rituals and miracles. It also demonstrates that people can be so cruel, can passed judgement, and can asked for forgiveness that quick when confronted with truth. All will be forgiving without taking into account all the harm that they have done. In the real world, these people will be punished. Celia Rodriguez seems to be wooden in so many scenes but equally infuririating when she started to do her verbal and physical abuse of Anda. With limited dialouge, a young Dindo Fernando portrayed Tateng’s lover convincingly. All the other supporting roles including Perla Bautista, Ernie Garcia and others gave a forgettable performances. About the two main lead, Edgar Mortiz and Vilma Santos did what they can to portrayed their roles. Edgar Mortiz seems to be trying very hard to be effective as the priest but acting is clearly not his forte. Would this be different if Jay Ilagan did this role? Vilma Santos succeed more with her solo scenes, talking to the patron saints and the bell tower, eating with her bare hands and trying to beautify her ugly face. – RV, (READ MORE)

“Despite of (or perhaps because of) her hideous appearance, she is held dear by the parish priest Padre Damaso but abhorred by the church caretaker, Edeng who maltreats her at every opportunity. Andang is ugly, ugly, ugly and deserves all the pain she can get…don’t think Mang Martin will give the miracle for free. Vilma emerges as the ugly hunchback Andeng! Sandra is gone! Death to fantasy!…” – Silver Screen Surfer, (READ MORE)

Feast for Eyes, Soul – “With only a little over an hour spent on the road, Lenten pilgrims can explore the heritage churches of Laguna province for the traditional “visita iglesia” (church visit) today. Laguna has 86 Catholic churches, 26 of these built between the 16th and 19th centuries. The churches give pilgrims glimpses of the Catholic faith’s beginnings and its role in the spiritual and cultural development of Laguna. Jerry Gaela, 51, a parish priest administering St. Paul the First Hermit Cathedral in San Pablo City, said that while visita iglesia was not a required practice among Catholics, it was “additional devotion for personal and spiritual growth.” Visita iglesia is traditionally done on the night of Maundy Thursday when the Blessed Sacrament is displayed in the churches. People used to visit seven churches, but now, they would go to as many as 14 churches and pray at the Stations of the Cross. The spirit is “to accompany the Lord in his Passion,” Gaela said. These are seven of Laguna’s heritage churches worth a visit today…San Bartolome Apostol Church, Nagcarlan town, The baroque church, 15 km from San Pablo, was first built in 1583 using light materials. It was in 1752 when the second church was built from stone and brick. However, the structure was damaged by a fire in 1781. A choir loft was added when the church was rebuilt in 1845 by Rev. Vicente Velloc, who also built the nearby Nagcarlan underground cemetery. The church was featured in the 1974 film, “Kampanerang Kuba,” starring now Batangas Rep. Vilma Santos-Recto, and the film’s 2005 television remake of the same title, starring Anne Curtis…” – Kimmy Baraoidan, Philippine Daily Inquirer, 13 April 2017 (READ MORE)

Filmography: Karugtong ang Kahapon (1975)

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Basic Information: Directed: Fely Crisostomo; Story: Nerissa Cabral; Screenplay: Mike Relon Makiling; Cast: Vilma Santos, Edgar Mortiz, Gloria Romero, Celia Rodriguez, Eddie Garcia, Jay Ilagan, Romy Mallari, Joseph Sytangco, Patria Plata, Ronald Ruiz; Original Music: Danny Subido; Cinematography: Ricardo Herrera; Film Editing: Gervacio Santos

Plot Description: “…When the happy, well-adjusted daughter of a middle-class couple discovers her father’s infidelity to her mother, her hysterical and overblown response to the discovery leads one to wonder how well-adjusted she could have been..” – Clarke Fountain, Rovi, Blockbuster (READ MORE)

Film Achievement: An Entry to the 1975 Metro Manila Film Festival

Film Review: “…May pagsisikap ang Karugtong Ang Kahapon na lumikha ng naiibang larawan ng babae. Sekretarya lamang ni Rafael si Norma ngunit tila wala siyang pakialam sa tradisyunal na huwarang pambabae na dapat lamang makipag-seks sa ilalim ng institusyon ng kasal. Nagdedesisyon siya ayon sa pinaniniwalaan niyang tama. Kahit may pananagutan na si Rafael, malaya niyang sinunod ang nais ng kanyang isip at katawan. Pero kailangan pa rin niyang itago ang katotohanan sa harap ni Raquel nang bigla siyang komprontahin nito ukol sa pakikipagrelasyon ng kanyang ama kay Beatrice. Sa kabila ng liberal na asta at asal na ipinakita sa pelikula, nakakapagtaka na pinairal pa rin ang anakronista at makalumang pagtuturing sa babae bilang martir. Mapapansin ito sa papel na ginampanan ni Gloria Romero. Ipinakita ni Beatrice ang hindi pasibong pagtanggap nito sa suliraning kinasasangkutan ng asawa, na tumututol naman siya kahit paano, hindi rin naman ipinakita na gumagawa siya ng hakbang na tumutungo, kahit bahagya, sa isang progresibong pagkamulat sa kanyang kalagayan. Ayon sa pagkakaganap, isinabalikat ni Vilma Santos sa papel ni Raquel ang buong bigat ng pasaning nakapaloob sa pelikula sa pamamagitan ng isang uri ng pagganap na kumikilos, nag-iisip at malalim na umuunawa sa karanasan. Sinubok ng Karugtong Ang Kahapon na hatakin ang manonood sa landas tungo sa matalinong pagsasalarawan at pag-unawa sa kababaihan. Sa maraming pagkakataon, pinilit nitong kumawala sa etiketang kinakabit sa babae pero naroon pa rin ang etiketang nakabatay sa patriyarkal na ayos ng mga bagay…” – Jojo Devera, Sari-saring Sineng Pinoy (READ MORE)

“…Starring Vilma, daughter of a “happy” couple Eddie Garcia and Gloria Romero. Throw in the other woman of Eddie, Celia Rodriguez and as expected, another morality play was born. Shown at the first MMFF…” – Mario O. Garces (READ MORE)

“…Nora Aunor’s entry, NV Productions’ Batu-Bato sa Langit (directed by Luciano B. Carlos), was a hit and won as 3rd Best Picture. Vilma Santos, on the other hand, gave a notable performance in Roma Films’ Karugtong ang Kahapon. That time, Nora and Vilma were in their peak, their career and the movies they made were being followed closely, compared, watched, praised, scrutinized both by fans and critics. Their storied and fierce rivalry dominated our movie industry for years. In fact, one could argue that even to this day, a Filipino movie fan is either a Noranian or a Vilmanian…” – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

Related Reading:

Filmography: Cariñosa (1973)

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Basic Information: Directed: Romy Susara; Story: Nestor Torre Jr.; Screenplay: Nestor Torre Jr.; Cast: Vilma Santos, Manny De Leon, Yoyoy Villame, Chanda Romero, Virginia Montes, Patria Plata, Ven Medina, Tito Arevalo, Ruth Farinas, Romeo Miranda, Elizabeth Vaughen, Doming Viray, Romy Luartes, Pons De Guzman, The Bordon Sisters, Greg Lozano, Beth Manlongat, Angelito; Original Music: Tito Arevalo; Cinematography: Benjamin Lobo

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: Second Vilma Santos-Manny De Leon film.

Film Review: “…Besides teaming up with Edgar Mortiz during her teen years, Vilma Santos also starred and appeared in many movies opposite other leading men…” – Simon Santos (READ MORE)

“…He became the leading man of Nora Aunor after Tirso Cruz III. Theirs was also a popular tandem. Decades later, when I finally got to talk to Nora during an interview, she revealed that their working relationship wasn’t really all that pleasant. Manny disappeared from the scene when Nora moved on to become a more serious actress. Whatever happened to Manny de Leon? When last heard from — many, many years ago — it was full of speculations and, sadly, those bits of information about him were unpleasant…” – Butch Francisco (READ MORE)

“…Romy Suzara comes back with Tinik. The film, which stars Raymond Bagatsing and Hayden Kho, tells the story of a middle-aged couturier who faces the many problems of being gay, and in the midst of all his struggles, tries to hold on to his own dignity. Romy rose to fame in the early ’70s with movies like Tatlong Mukha ni Rosa Vilma and Cariñosa, both starring Vilma Santos…” – The Philippine Star), 06 September 2013 (READ MORE)

Filmography: Dyesebel At Ang Mahiwagang Kabibe (1973)

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Basic Information: Directed, screenplay: Emmanuel H. Borlaza; Story: Mars Ravelo; Cast: Vilma Santos, Romeo Miranda, Divina Valencia, Mina Aragon, Rossana Marquez, Chanda Romero, Joseph Sytangco, Elizabeth Vaughn, Patria Plata, Lito Calzado, Ricky Valencia, Greg Lozano, Chris Santos, Dave Esguerra, Romy Luartes, Doming Viray, SOS Daredevils; Original Music: Tito Arevalo; Cinematography: Benjamin L. Lobo; Editing: Gervacio Santos; Art Direction: Honorato Dela Paz; Sound: Angel Avellana

Plot Description: A Mars Ravelo classic about a young mermaid named Dyesebel who lives in an undersea kingdom with other mermaids. They are outcasts, not wanted on earth, believing their presence is bad luck. But when she falls in love with a human being, she vows to do everything yto have legs and become a part of her earthly love’s world… even if it means risking her life. – Kabayan Central (READ MORE)

One of the most popular and best-loved creatures of local folk mythology, Dyesebel is reincarnated in the person of winsome superstar Vilma Santos. The mermaid is driven from the deep sea literally into the arms of a mortal ashore, the good-looking and moreno Fredo, played by singer, Romeo Miranda, whose fascination for her turns to love. Against all odds, their love for each other is put to a series of tests as they face a shocked and disbelieving human society and the dangers and intrigues in dry land. A funny, sad, suspenseful, wonderful and infinitely entertaining movie. Also starring Ike Lozada, Mina Aragon, German Moreno, and Divina Valencia. Produced by Tagalog Ilang-Ilang Productions under the direction of Emmanuel H. Borlaza. – Trigon Video

Film Achievement: 2nd Top Grosser of the 8th Manila Film Festival; Best Sound Recording – Angel Avellana

For the record: – “…FPJ Productions’ Ang Agila at ang Araw with a total gross receipt of P561,128 was adjudged the top grosser of the festival. Tagalog Ilang-Ilang Productions’ Dyesebel at ang Mahiwagang Kabibe, the first day top grosser came in close second with P499,463. Roda Productions’ Nueva Vizcaya was third with P461,405…” – VIdeo48 (READ MORE)

Film Review: “…On Darna and Dyesebel. “Darna (she did four Darna movies) and Dyesebel were very difficult to do. I wore body stockings underneath the Darna costumes. Just before I was presented to the press in my Darna costume, Douglas Quijano, Alfie Lorenzo and William Leary convinced me that the body stockings didn’t look good and there was nothing to be afraid of because, I had good skin. I took off the stockings and since then I wore the Darna costume without them. Dyesebel was harrowing. It took 10 people to help me into the costume and out of it. If I needed to go to the toilet, they created a hole on the costume to make my life bearable. When I did these movies, we weren’t as wired as we are today. In Darna, I was tied and lifted to simulate flying. It was physically punishing…” – Boy Abunda, The Philippine Star, July 31, 2009 (READ MORE)

In the 1973 Dyesebel movie, Dyesebel lives in an undersea kingdom of mermaids far from the land of humans because the humans believe that the mermaids are the cause of misfortune. Dyesebel fell in love with a male human being. In order to be with the man that she likes, she swore to find a way to be transformed into a female human being. In the movie, “Si Dyesebel at Ang Mahiwagang Kabibe,” the role of Dyesebel was played by Vilma Santos and Fredo was played by Romeo Miranda. – Jun B (READ MORE)

“…1973’s Dyesebel (aka Si Dyesebel at ang Mahiwagang Kabibe, or “Dyesebel and the Magic Conch”) is what would today be referred to as a reboot, with beloved Filipino star Vilma Santos taking over in the title role. Mars Ravelo would make 1973 a very busy year for Santos, as she had also made her debut as Darna that year, in Lipad, Darna, Lipad!, and would go on to complete a second Darna feature before the year was out. As did the Darna pictures, this Dyesebel benefits greatly from the undeniable raw charm of Santos, who, in place of Edna Luna’s ethereal glamour, provides a likeable and approachable portrayal of the mermaid heroine as a loveable and trouble prone naïf. This new Dyesebel, directed by Emmanuel H. Borlazza, takes even further than its predecessor the idea of the mermaids as something feared and reviled by the human world. This is illustrated in a scene where a group of them comes ashore only to be met by a maniacal, sword-and-pitchfork wielding mob. A graphically violent fight follows, with much blood spilled and many a fin brutally slashed (I think that would count as “HMV” for “Human on Mermaid Violence”, for those keeping track.) In addition to this bracing infusion of gore, Dyesebel also welcomes us to the 1970s with a generous display of boobs (none of them Santos’s) and an absurdly confident rolling out of bush league special effects. Among these last are a giant seahorse upon which Dyesebel and Fredo (Romeo Miranda) ride during a romantic interlude and an adorable giant octopus from which Dyesebel is saved by a helpful swarm of puppet electric eels…” – Todd, Die, Danger, Die, Die, Kill! (READ MORE)

“…The mermaid character, presumably inspired by the Hans Christian Andersen classic fairy tale The Little Mermaid, was conceived by Mars Ravelo, serialized in Pilipino Komiks in 1952-53 and illustrated by Elpidio Torres. It has nothing to do at all with the 1938 Hollywood classic Jezebel (starring Bette Davis) except that the titles are soundalike. The first Dyesebel movie was made by Manuel Vista Production/Premiere Productions in 1953, with Edna Luna in the title role, directed by Gerardo de Leon. The leading man was Jaime dela Rosa as Fredo. If memory serves, Hollywood has so far done only two mermaid movies, Splash, with Darryl Hannah in the title role and Tom Hanks as co-star and an animated feature. Other actresses who have played Dyesebel include: Eva Montes in Anak ni Dyesebel (1964); Vilma Santos (1973); Alma Moreno in Sisid, Dyesebel, Sisid (1978); Alice Dixson (1990); and Charlene Gonzalez (1996). On TV, Marian Rivera played it, with Dingdong Dantes as leading man. In the ABS-CBN version, Dawn Zulueta will play Dyesebel’s mother with Sam Milby and Gerald Anderson as leading men. The Fredo character has been played by Romeo Miranda (with Vilma), Matt Ranillo III (Alma), Richard Gomez (with Alice) and Matthew Mendoza (with Charlene)…” – Ricky Lo, The Philippine Star, 10 Jan 2014 (READ MORE)

“…Aside from the three most popular characters from the pages of “Komiks,” Ravelo is also behind the superheroes Lastikman, Dragonna, Flash Bomba, Tiny Tony, Trudis Liit, Kapitan Boom, and Jack and Jill, among others. Since her 1947 comicbook debut, Darna has been played by over 15 different actresses in TV and films, with Vilma Santos’ 1970s portrayal considered to be the most iconic take…” – ABS-CBN News, 12 Jan 2014 (READ MORE)

Filmography: My Love at First Sight (1971)

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Basic Information: Direction: Armando De Guzman; Story, screenplay: Natalie De Guzman; Cast: Vilma Santos, Edgar Mortiz, Joe Sison, Patria Plata, Scarlet, Cloyd Robinson, Yazmin Romero, Feling Cudia, Armando De Guzman Jr., Maria Roberta; Production Co.: Tagalog Ilang-ilang Productions; Film Poster: Video 48

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Reviews; “…By late 1969, movie producers had been tapping a Vilma Santos-Edgar Mortiz love team. Edgar was a Tawag ng Tanghalan winner. They started to be together in the movies, My Darling Eddie (1969) and The Jukebox King (1969)…In 1970, the love team of Vilma Santos and Edgar “Bobot” Mortiz was officially launched in the movie Young Love, together with the another popular love team during that time, Nora Aunor and Tirso Cruz III. The Vi and Bot love team went on to do 14 more movies in 1970—The Young Idols, Songs and Lovers, Sweethearts, Sixteen, Love Letters, Love is for the Two of Us, Mga Batang Bangketa, My Pledge of Love, Renee Rose, Baby Vi, Because You Are Mine, Edgar Loves Vilma, From the Bottom of My Heart, and I Love You Honey. All did well at the box-office…” – Rommel R. Llanes (READ MORE)

“…Noong Dekada ’70, ang mga young stars ay kailangang marunong kumanta dahil yun ang uso kaya naman nagtayo ng sariling recording company ang nasirang manager ni Vi na si William Leary dahil ayaw niyang pahuhuli sa uso ang kanyang alaga. Ilan sa mga naging recording artists ng WILEARS RECORDS bukod kay Vi ay sina Edgar Mortiz, Ed Finlan, Sahlee Quizon, Hilda Koronel at Esperanza Fabon. According to Vi, kapag nagrerecord siya ng kanta ay nakatalikod siya sa dingding ng recording company at si Bobot ang umaalalay sa kanya. Ang SIXTEEN, na sinulat ni Danny Subido ang unang recording na ginawa ni Vi at ito ay flipsided by It’s So Wonderful To Be In Love. Ang SIXTEEN ay agad naging gold record at dahil dito ay gumawa ng pelikula ang Tagalog Ilang Ilang Productions, ang home studio ni Vi at ito ay ginawa nilang pamagat katambal si Edgar Mortiz. Hindi nyo naitatanong, muntik nang manalo si Vi bilang most promising singer sa AWIT AWARDS noong early ’70s…” – Alfonso Valencia (READ MORE)

“…The loveteam of Edgar Mortiz and Vilma Santos endured a stiff competition from teeny bopper love team of Nora Aunor and Tirso Cruz III and came up with equal success with string of hit films during the musical era of the 70s. Together they did forgettable but commercial hits and also some hints of the years to come to Vilma Santos’ long career. The most notable one: Dama De Noche. Total Number of films with Vilma Santos – 25 (Young Love, Teenage Jamboree, Songs and Lovers, Renee Rose, My Pledge of Love, Mga Batang Bangketa, Love Is for the Two of Us, I Love You Honey, From the Bottom of My Heart, Baby Vi, Love Letters, The Wonderful World of Music, The Sensations, The Young Idols, Sweethearts, Sixteen, Leron-Leron Sinta, Edgar Love Vilma, Don’t Ever Say Goodbye, Dama de Noche, Anak ng Aswang, Because You Are Mine, Kampanerang Kuba, Kasalanan Kaya, Karugtong ang Kahapon…” – RV (READ MORE)

“…Si Edgar Mortiz ang unang nakapareha ni Vilma Santos as a teen star. Nakilala sila as the “Subok na Matibay, Subok na Matatag” loveteam called Vi and Bot at naging magka-steady sila sa tunay na buhay. Marami silang ginawang pelikula as teen stars in the early 70s…” – Showbiz Portal (READ MORE)