Filmography: Makahiya at Talahib (1976)

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Basic Information: Directed, screenplay: Emmanuel H. Borlaza; Story: Anthony Taylor; Cast: Vilma Santos, Rudy Fernandez, Trixia Gomez, Gloria Romero, Anthony Rodriguez, Romeo Rivera, Rocco Montalban; Executive producer: Cherry Ong; Original Music: Tito Sotto; Cinematography: Oscar Querijero; Film Editing: Jose Tarnate; Art Direction: Gerry Guanlao; Sound: Gaudencio Barredo; Theme song: “Aking Bituin” Sung by Allan Castro; Composed by Tito Sotto; Released thru Vicor Music Corporation

Plot Description: Arturo (Rudy Fernandez) is a convict on the run after being framed for rape. Aurora (Vilma Santos), a sculptress at odds with her overbearing mother (Gloria Romero), falls for him and is convinced of his innocence. When Arturo takes revenge on those who framed him, Aurora helps him plot his escape. This, while her sister Beatriz (Trixia Gomez) has a brief affair with Arturo. – Music & Laughter TV (READ MORE)

Film Achievement:  One of the top box office hit of the 1976 Metro Manila Film Festival (The first film of Vilma and Rudy and the first screen kiss of Ate Vi).

Film Review: “…Her metamorphosis began in late 1976 when she agreed to be kissed by Rudy Fernandez in Makahiya at Talahib. It was a “feeler” of sort and when the public clanked its tongue in obvious approval, Vilma shelved her lollipops-and-roses image and proved that she, too, could be a woman – a wise move indeed because at that time her career was on a down swing and her movies were not making money. Then she did Mga Rosas sa Putikan for her own VS Films where she played a country girl forced into prostitution in the big city. The movie did fairly well at the tills. Good sign. And came her romance with Romeo Vasquez, boosting both their stocks at the box office (their two starrers, Nag-aapoy na Damdamin and Pulot-Gata where Vilma did her own wet style, were big moneymakers). The tandem, although it did help Vilma, actually helped Vasquez more in re-establishing himself at the box office (without Vilma, his movies with other leading ladies hardly create any ripple). In Susan Kelly, Edad 20, Vilma played a notorious-woman role that required her to wear skimpy bikini briefs in some scenes, following it up with two giant sizzlers (Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon and Masarap, Masakit ang Umibig) that catapulted her as the newest Bold Queen. Then came Burlesk Queen…” – Ricardo F. Lo, Expressweek Magazine January 19, 1978 (READ MORE)

“…Why Borlaza? Because Emmanuel H. Borlaza is a formula director, a tried and tested moneymaker for local film companies and an example of a commercial success who also hungers for artistic fulfillment. It was Maning Borlaza who directed the box-office hit revival of Darna and Dyesebel, those heroines of less demanding times, and followed of less demanding times, and followed them with more Vilma Santos-Edgar Mortiz starrers…Whether the lure was really Borlaza and not Vilma (as Darna) or Alma (as Eva), one would still not find out in Makahiya at Talahib, the Goodwill production that Maning is directing as a filmfest bet. Vilma is starring, you see, opposite Rudy Fernandez who portrays the man on the run. Maning, however, he has been quoted to have said that “My next 20 years are modestly provided for, I don’t think I will live more than that. Henceforth, I will split my movie work to what I want to do and what the public likes. He wants, it seems, to recover his old self, the Borlaza who filmed Pyscho-Maniac, a suspense thriller which cast Divina Valencia, Dindo Fernando and Ray Marcos and won him the Academy’s best screenplay award in ’68, who packed so much good action in Mindanao, the movie that bagged four statuettes in the Manila Filmfest of the same year, and who directed Vilma Santos’s way to the FAMAS best actress award for the performance in Dama de Noche. And yet, he is not that keen to do films that might suffer the fate of O’Hara’s Mortal or Bernal’s Nunal sa Tubig. “Their box-office results are not encouraging,” says Maning. He admits he still goes a little commercial. That is why there is a love scene between Vilma and Rudy in Makahiya that Maning expects people might be talking about, more than the torrid shots of Rudy and Trixia Gomez. The 41-year old director also wrote the story and screenplay of Makahiya…Nowadays, he even makes two pictures at a time. “I just finished Makahiya and Teatro Manila. It’s cheaper that way. You don’t waste any calendar day. No stars available for Makahiya, we would work on Teatro…” – Chelo R. Banal, Philippine Panorama Magazine, 26 December 1976 (READ MORE)

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