FILM REVIEW: LOVE LETTERS


The Plot: Film-Am Edgar falls in love with Vilma. The two had a set back that ended with Edgar returning all Vilma’s love letters that he regreted and wanted it back. He went to Vilma’s house to retrieve it but was caught and accused of stealing. The whole misunderstanding ended up in court but was settled eventually. Edgar left the country but returned for Alona Alegre’s wedding to Victor Wood. He also reunited Vilma. – RV (READ MORE)

The Reviews: Love Letters started with Vilma entering a living room and Baby De Jesus started playing the piano.  Suddenly, Vilma started singing and after finishing her song, she left the room, while a very young Alona Alegre sitting beside her appeared to be in her own world, as if she heared, nothing.  There were no interaction between the three, no dialouge, making this opening scene quite irritating.  The next scene, we found out that Edgar, played by Edgar Mortiz is a Filipino-American. We assumed that he is vacationing and taking some course. Next scene, Victor Wood is singing on the telephone while Alona Alegre is listening on the other line. Then it Edgar turn to sing.  This time, in the men’s dormitory followed by Baby De Jesus.  Her limited dialouge: she wanted to sing  “to entertain Vilma.”  Then Edgar and Vilma are set to meet in a park but because Vilma was so late, Edgar decided to leave. When she arrived and found no Edgar, she started to cry and ofcourse, she sings!  Not to be outdone, its Romy Mallari’s turn to sing!  Then its Edgar turn to sing again.  Edgar got so mad with Vilma and decided to return all of Vilma’s love letters.  In protest, Vilma returned his gift, a ring and bracelet.

Afterwards she sings the theme song, “Love Letter.” She followed this up with her day dreaming scenes, remeniscing the time when the two of them are singing in the park. She then fell asleep but was awaken by an intruder! Presto! It was Edgar! Stealing their love letters! He escaped when Vilma’s parent caught them talking. The next scenes was a courtscenes. Vilma and Edgar plus Vilma’s parent testified in front of a judge. A phone call from the mayor who is connected to Edgar postponed the judge’s decision.  As turned out, Vilma’s parent also owned some love letters which made them understand what their daughter is now going through. At the breakfast table the next day, Vilma all of the sudden proclaimed that she doesn’t care about Edgar anymore. Then they discovered that Edgar and his friends decided to have a picket line in their house (ala-“Occupy Wall Street”???).  They decided to remained in the picketline over night with more singing.  Sleeping outside, the girls headed by Alona Alegre, decided to join the picketline. Vilma’s parent confronted them and Victor Wood all of the sudden declared that he wanted to marry Alona Alegre! And to add to the drama, Edgar decided to leave the country. The next scenes was Vilma receiving love letters over time. Then finally the promised wedding of Victor Wood and Alona Alegre, Edgar then seranade Alona and Victor.  When Vilma heard and saw Edgar, she run to the church’s balcony.  They reunited with a duet!  The End.

Love Letters is a musical films specially made for the fans of “teeny-bopper” stars – Vi and Bot.  The film was probably shot with improvisations, which means, without a written script.  This was noticeably clear as the film’s main characters and the actual names of the actors were not change at all.  The film’s main plot was the the stealing of love letters that ended in court,  followed by picket line (ala-“Occupy” Wall Street) that was hard to believe.  And also the one-after the other testimonies of Edgar, Vilma and both parents that were irritatingly funny. Although we are used to Vilma’s tolereable singing, we’re more surprise to see a singing Alona Alegre!  She looked more like Eugene Domingo (clearly before her sexy films/image).  One more thing, Alona’s wedding gown was worth a second look, its not like your ordinary wedding gown.  The head piece was a beaded hood that covers her hair and neck.  With so much singing, Baby De Jesus’s voice stands out among the girls but her piano playing acting was over the top. Victor Wood’s duet with Edgar Mortiz, “Beautiful Dreamers” is worth downloading. Danny Subido was responsible for inserting all the musical numbers that was quite a tasks particularly without a well written musical screenplay.  The film was shot in Baguio City and cinematographer, Avelino Peralta’s did a wonderful job showcasing the city on Vilma’s day dreaming except for the akward courtscenes.  Love Letters was produced by Tagalog Ilang-Ilang Production and directed by Abraham Cruz, a forgettable film that only a die hard Vi and Bot fans (and those who loves film nostalgia) can only appreciate. – RV

RELATED READING:
IMDB: Love Letters (1970)
IMDB: Abraham Cruz
IMDB: Edgar Mortiz
IMDB: Esperanza Fabon
IMDB: Romy Mallari
Vilma Santos From Wikipedia
Edgar Mortiz From Wikipedia
Vilma and Edgar Duet (Video)
Clips – Love Letters (Video)
Vilma Santos-Edgar Mortiz Love Team Circa 1970

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Filmography: Ibong Lukaret (1975)

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Basic Information: Directed: Tito Sanchez; Story: Maria Theresa; Screenplay: Jose Flores Sibal; Cast: Vilma Santos, George Estregan, Alona Alegre, Nick Romano, Marissa Delgado, Rudy Fernandez, Arnold Mendoza, Daria Ramirez, Joe Sison, Franco Guerrero, Lucita Soriano; Original Music: Danny Subido; Cinematography: Ricardo Herrera

Plot Description: Vilma witnessed the traumatic death of her mother that made her crazy until she met the murderer again.

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Review: “…Estregan won critical acclaim for many of his performances. In 1972, he was named FAMAS Best Actor for Sukdulan, and would win two other FAMAS Awards for Best Supporting actor for Kid Kaliwete (1978) and Lumakad Kang Hubad sa Mundong Ibabaw (1980). He was nominated for the FAMAS Award three other times, as Best Actor for Lumapit, Lumayo ang Umaga (1975) and Lalake Ako (1982), and for Best Supporting Actor in Magkayakap sa Magdamag (1986). He also received a nomination from the Gawad Urian as Best Actor for Hostage: Hanapin si Batuigas (1977)…” – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

“…1975 was another productive year for Vilma Santos as she did nine films mostly title roles like Vilma Viente Nueve, Darna Vs the Planet Women, and Ibong Lukaret. It was the “prep” stage for the years to come as she was given more mature roles like the local festival entry, “Karugtong ang Kahapon” and Celso Ad Castillo’s “Tag-ulan sa Tag-araw.” Tagulan was the first film of Vilma and Christopher De Leon. While Vilma was testing the water for more serious mature projects, Ishmael Bernal decided to return to his original forte, drama, after years of doing light comedies and television work. He came up with “Mister Mo, Lover boy Ko” and “Lumapit, Lumayo Ang Umaga.” Both films featured sexy star, Elizabeth Oropeza…” – RV (READ MORE)

“…Before he was Vilma’s leading man in Makahiya at Talahib, Rudy Fernandez played a supporting role in Ibong Lukaret. Both films were released in 1975…” – The 28th (READ MORE)

Filmography: Dugo at Pagibig sa Kapirasong Lupa (1975)

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Basic Information: Direction: Ding M. De Jesus (segment 2), Cesar Gallardo (segment 4), Armando A. Herrera (segment 3), Johnny Pangilinan (segment 1), Romy Suzara (segment 5); Writing credits: Johnny Pangilinan, Ding M. De Jesus, Armando A. Herrera, Johnny Pangilinan, Nestor Torre, Johnny Pangilinan, Prudencio Mariano; Cast: Eddie Del Mar, Ruben Rustia, Barbara Perez, Teody Belarmino, Perry Baltazar, Dante Rivero, Eddie Garcia, Rosemarie Gil, Vic Vargas, Tony Blade, Mario Montalban, Jerry Bravo, Baby Lalaine, Celia Fuentes, Eddie Arenas, Cesar Ramirez, Johnny Monteiro, Eddie Nicart, Mario Escudero, Carlos Salazar, Ramon Revilla, Ramon Zamora, Liza Lorena, Dante Varona, Lito Legaspi, Desiree Destreza, Max Alvarado, Nello Nayo, Anita Linda, Willy Milan, Sancho Tesalona, Virginia Montes, Ric Bustamante, Venchito Galvez, Pat Salvador, Totoy Torrente, Fernando Poe Jr., Gina Alajar, Zernan Manahan, Mary Walter, Vic Varrion, Danny Rojo, Joseph Estrada, Helen Gamboa, George Estregan, Paquito Diaz, Paraluman, Vic Silayan, Leopoldo Salcedo, Jun Mariano, Liza Villa, Alona Alegre, Nora Aunor, Tirso Cruz III, Tino De Lara, Joaquin Fajardo, Rudy Fernandez, Jay Ilagan, Hilda Koronel, Bomber Moran, Walter Navarro, Elizabeth Oropesa, Patria Plata, Renato Robles, Jose Romulo, Vilma Santos, Angelo Ventura; Producer: Domingcilio Bravo; Original Music: Tito Arevalo; Cinematography: Fred Conde, Loreto Isleta, Ben Lobo, Sergio Lobo, Fermin Pagsisihan, Ricardo Remias; Film Editing: Teofilo de Leon, Segundo Ramos, Augusto Salvador; Sound: Luis Reyes; Release Date:12 June 1975 (Philippines); Production Company:Bravo Film Productions – IMDB (READ MORE)

Plot Description: Dugo at Pagibig sa Kapirasong Lupa is 1975 Epic Film with Star-stunted cast like Fernando Poe Jr, Ramon Revilla, Joseph Estrada, Nora Aunor, Dante Rivero, Eddie Garcia, Vic Vargas, George Estregan, Mary Walter, Gina Alajar and the other all time favorite artist…Filipino People fight against colonialism Spain, Japan and even their fellow Filipinos abusing the power in the government…” – Wikipilipinas (READ MORE)

A Must for the Filipino History Students and for everyone who wants to awaken the innate nationalism in them. These series of stories depicting the fight of the Filipinos against colonialism of Spain, Japan and even their fellow Filipinos abusing the power in the government. A seemingly serious film but spiced with the star-studded cast like Fernando Poe Jr., Ramon Revilla, Joseph Estrada, Nora Aunor, Dante Rivero, Eddie Garcia, Vic Vargas, Goerge Estregan and the other all time favorite artists. This movie even highlighted the comparison between the love of country and the other kind of love we offer to our family and to our beloved as the story featured love stories in the midst of tragic and bloody war happening in our society. – Kabayan Central (READ MORE)

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Review: “…Hindi dito natapos ang Nora-Vilma rivalry. Pero ang pagsasama ng dalawang aktres sa isang pelikula was not repeated after Danny Zialcita’s T-Bird at Ako (released in 1982). Their initial appearance together was in 1970’s Young Love; naulit in 1978, sa Ikaw Ay Akin ni Bernal; at mayroon silang tig-isang episode sa Dugo at Pag-Ibig sa Kapirasong Lupa in 1975 at Pinagbuklod ng Pag-Ibig, also released in early 1978. At the height of the Nora-Vilma rivalry for acting supremacy, ang kanilang mga pelikula, magkahiwalay man sila o magkasama, ang may malaking kinikita for their producers. In 1982 and 1983, Vilma was Box-Office Queen and Urian Best Actress; while Nora did several blockbusters (like Beloved and Till We Meet Again). There was social unrest, following the Ninoy Aquino assassination on Aug. 21, 1983, pero masigla ang daigdig ng TV at pelikula. Sikat pa rin sina Nora at Vilma…” – William Reyes (READ MORE)

“…Sa taong 1975 ay nakagawa si Vi ng siyam na pelikula…..Basta’t Isipin Mong Mahal Kita (Enero 24, 1975) kasama sina Eugene Torre at Coney Reyes…..Nakakahiya? (Pebrero 28, 1975) kasama sina Eddie Rodriguez, Gloria Romero at Barbara Perez…..Ibong Lukaret (Abril 25, 1975) kasama sina George Estregan, Alona Alegre, Nick Romano at Rudy Fernandez…..ang all star-cast na Dugo at Pagibig sa Kapirasong Lupa (Hunyo 12, 1975)…..Teribol Dobol (Hunyo 27, 1975) kasama si Chiquito at Walter Navarro…..Vilma 29 (Agosto 29, 1975) kasama si Jun Aristorenas…..Karugtong Ang Kahapon (Setyembre 21, 1975) kasma sina Bobot, Gloria Romero, Celia Rodriguez, Eddie Garcia, Jay Ilagan at Joseph Sytangco…..Tag-ulan Sa Tag-araw (Oktubre 17, 1975) kasama si Christopher de Leon…..at ang pang-Christmas presentation ng TIIP na Darna Vs. The Planetwomen (Disyembre 25, 1975) kasama sina Rossana Marquez at Zandro Zamora. Sa pelikulang Nakakahiya?, si Vi ang nanalong best actress ng Bacolod City Film Festival…” – Alfonso Valencia (READ MORE)

Filmography: Love Letters (1970)

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Basic Information: Directed: Abraham Cruz; Story: Felipe Baron; Screenplay: Felipe Baron; Cast: Vilma Santos, Edgar Mortiz, Esperanza Fabon, Romy Mallari, Baby De Jesus, Bobby Roldan, Alona Alegre, Victor Wood, Baby Alcaraz, Cloyd Robinson, Ernie Vega, Dell Martin, Wilma Landicho, Azucena Guevarra, Imelda Alonzo, Norma Blancaflor; Original Music: Danny Subido; Cinematography: Avelino Peralta; Film Editing: Teofilo de Leon; Art Design: Greg Alcid Jr.; Sound: Flaviano Villareal; Film poster: Video48

Plot Description: Film-Am Edgar falls in love with Vilma. The two had a set back that ended with Edgar returning all Vilma’s love letters that he regreted and wanted it back. He went to Vilma’s house to retrieve it but was caught and accused of stealing. The whole misunderstanding ended up in court but was settled eventually. Edgar left the country but returned for Alona Alegre’s wedding to Victor Wood. He also reunited Vilma.

An early Vilma Santos-Edgar Mortiz romantic musical also featuring the old gang – Romy Mallari, Esperanza Fabon, Baby de Jesus, Bobby Roldan, Alona Alegre and jukebox king Victor Wood. The story is about young love, with all its anxieties and conclusion. It dramatizes the pains of growing up and the need to follow romantic ideals. An infectious trip down memory lane, with the original D’Sensation gang the way they were! Directed by Abraham Cruz for Tagalong Ilang-Ilang Productions. – Trigon Video

Film Achievement: An Entry to the 1970 Manila Film Festival

Film Review: Love Letters is a musical films specially made for the fans of “teeny-bopper” stars – Vi and Bot. The film was probably shot with improvisations, which means, without a written script. This was noticeably clear as the film’s main characters and the actual names of the actors were not change at all. The film’s main plot was the the stealing of love letters that ended in court, followed by picket line (ala-“Occupy” Wall Street) that was hard to believe. And also the one-after the other testimonies of Edgar, Vilma and both parents that were irritatingly funny. Although we are used to Vilma’s tolereable singing, we’re more surprise to see a singing Alona Alegre! She looked more like Eugene Domingo (clearly before her sexy films/image). One more thing, Alona’s wedding gown was worth a second look, its not like your ordinary wedding gown. The head piece was a beaded hood that covers her hair and neck. With so much singing, Baby De Jesus’s voice stands out among the girls but her piano playing acting was over the top. Victor Wood’s duet with Edgar Mortiz, “Beautiful Dreamers” is worth downloading. Danny Subido was responsible for inserting all the musical numbers that was quite a tasks particularly without a well written musical screenplay. The film was shot in Baguio City and cinematographer, Avelino Peralta’s did a wonderful job showcasing the city on Vilma’s day dreaming except for the akward courtscenes. Love Letters was produced by Tagalog Ilang-Ilang Production and directed by Abraham Cruz, a forgettable film that only a die hard Vi and Bot fans (and those who loves film nostalgia) can only appreciate. – RV, (READ MORE)

“…The filmfest saw the entry of neophyte Lino Brocka into the Philippine movie mainstream with his first directorial assignment under Lea Productions’ Wanted Perfect Mother. It introduced for the first time child sensation Snooky (Serna). Teen superstars Nora Aunor and Vilma Santos have their respective entries: Nora had two entries, Nora in Wonderland (with Manny de Leon) for Tower Productions and Young at Heart (with Tirso Cruz III) for Sampaguita Pictures, while Vilma with his lone entry, Love Letters with Edgar Mortiz for Tagalog Ilang-Ilang Productions. Capping the list were 4 action movies— Tony Ferrer as Tony Falcon, Agent X-44 in Crisis, Zaldy Zshornack and Vic Vargas teamed up in Mga Batong Buhay, Rex Lapid in Shotgun Kid and Jun Aristorenas in Dimasalang; two comedy films, Up, Up and Away with Dolphy and Servillano Zapata with Chiquito, the Jukebox king Eddie Peregrina with his entry Your Love, bombshell Rossana Marquez in Modelong Ginto and Eddie Rodriguez with another dramatic performance in Bakit Pa Ako?…” – Video 48 (READ MORE)

RELATED READING:

Filmography: Songs and Lovers (1970)

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Basic Information: Directed: A. Gregorio; Story: Felipe Baron, Henry Cuino; Screenplay: Felipe Baron, Henry Cuino; Cast: Eddie Perigrina, Alona Alegre, Vilma Santos, Edgar Mortiz, Esperanza Fabon, Fred Panopio, Thelma Kennedy, Romy Mallari, The Blinkers, Pauline Sevilla; Original Music: Danny Subido; Film poster: Video48

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Reviews; “…Peregrina’s popularity was high, particularly among masses. Jukebox, the coin-operated machine which plays selected music, was said to have attained much popularity as well because of continuous requests of Peregrina’s songs. His fame surge even more among the Filipino masses when he became movie star, cast with the leading ladies of the 1970s, including Esperanza Fabon and Nora Aunor, with whom he had a TV show entitled The Eddie-Nora Show on Channel 9 in the 1960s. Among his movies included Mardy, Memories of Our Dreams with Esperanza Fabon. He co-starred with his wife Lyn Salazarin in Batul of Mactan in 1974. He was also the leading man in Dito sa Aking Puso (1970) with Nora Aunor and with Vilma Santos in Mardy. Most of his films were produced by JBC Productions, which invariably paired him with Vilma Santos, Edgar Mortiz, Esperanza Fabon, and directed by Bebong Osorio. When not busy attending show business commitments, he managed his own business, including Edviper Records and the Pervil Photo Studio…” – Wikepedia (READ MORE)

“…During the early 60’s, a singer’s popularity was practically determined by the jukebox, a coin-operated machine that can play specially selected songs from self-contained media. It was a period when fans dropped 20 centavos in a jukebox to listen to Timi Yuro’s “Crazy” or Matt Monro’s “Walk Away” and “Before You Go.” Of course, Eddie’s songs like “Together Again,” “Two Lovely Flowers,” “Mardy” and “I Do Love You” were such national anthems and outdid their foreign counterparts not only in the jukebox market but also on the airwaves, in restaurants and well…the local cabarets…” – Gypsy Baldovino (READ MORE)

“…By late 1969, movie producers had been tapping a Vilma Santos-Edgar Mortiz love team. Edgar was a Tawag ng Tanghalan winner. They started to be together in the movies, My Darling Eddie (1969) and The Jukebox King (1969)…In 1970, the love team of Vilma Santos and Edgar “Bobot” Mortiz was officially launched in the movie Young Love, together with the another popular love team during that time, Nora Aunor and Tirso Cruz III. The Vi and Bot love team went on to do 14 more movies in 1970—The Young Idols, Songs and Lovers, Sweethearts, Sixteen, Love Letters, Love is for the Two of Us, Mga Batang Bangketa, My Pledge of Love, Renee Rose, Baby Vi, Because You Are Mine, Edgar Loves Vilma, From the Bottom of My Heart, and I Love You Honey. All did well at the box-office…” – Rommel R. Llanes (READ MORE)

Filmography: Maria Cecilia (1965)

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Basic Information: Direction: Ding M. De Jesus; Screenplay: Ding M. De Jesus; Story: Susana C. de Guzman; Cast: Marlene Dauden (Maria Cecilia), Van De Leon, Alona Alegre, Tony Cruz Jr., Vilma Santos, Jose Mari, Dr. Nanding Andres; Music: Tito Arevalo; Production Company: Larry Santiago Productions; Release Date: 14 May 1965 (Philippines)

Plot Description: A DZXL Radio and Tagumpay Magazine Serial.

Film Achievement: 1965 FAMAS: Best Actor Nomination – Van De Leon; Best Supporting Actress Nomination – Vilma Santos

Film Review: – “Young and cute Vilma Santos is one of the few child stars who have hit the screen with continued success. Although not as well-publicized as the adult stars, she is gaining popularity with lot of fans who recognize her warm personality and talent. Her successful debut in Sampaguita Pictures’ Trusdis Liit gave her more movie offers. Vilma, who just turned 13 last Nov. 3, has been in the movies for three years and already has 16 pictures to her credit. A talented youngster, she often steals the spotlight from her senior colleagues. In Ging, Naligaw Na Anghel, Anak Ang Iyong Ina, and many other films, she was a standout in tear-jearking scenes. As a result, she is always in demand for such roles. Despite her success, Vilma remains unaffected as a child. At the St. mary’s Academy where she is a six-grader, she has more than her share of friends not because she is a celebrity but because of her natural chumminess. In fact, she is so fond of her friends that their house on Lunas St in La Loma, Quezon City is often filled with them. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Amado Santos, do not discourage her gregariousness and instead look upon it as part of her developing personality.

Bright Future – One of Vilma’s ambitions is to take up fine arts – that is, if the movies wouldn’t completely claim her in the future. Dr. Jose R. Perez has made a tempting offer to sign her to a contract with Sampaguita and VP Pictures when she reaches the age of 14, that is, one year from now. Vilma’s movie commitments don’t prevent her from being a good student. She could have been easily way above average if only her shooting schedules sometimes do not prevent her from attending her classes. “Doing two tasks at the same time gave me a hard time at the beginning but I’ve adjusted to it now,” said this youngster who still goes for lollipops, ice cream, toys, and play. Vilma, who spends her leisure hours listening to radio dramas, dancing and playing with her three other sisters, will be seen in her coming films, Sigaw Ng Batingaw of Argo Productions. – Julio F. Silverio, The Weekly Nation, 31 December 1965, reposted at Pelikula Atbp blog (READ MORE)

Filmography: Sa Bawat Pintig ng Puso (1964)

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Basic Information: Direction: Armando de Guzman; Original story adapted from Bulaklak Magazine serial novel; Story and Screenplay: Jose Flores Sibal; Cast: Zaldy Zshornack, Marlene Dauden, Alona Alegre, Sammy Barretto/ Also Starring Jose Garcia, Ely Roque, Totoy Rivera, Rene Roque/ with Lillian Leonardo and Vilma Santosè; Music: Restie Umali; Producer: Larry Santiago; Production Company: Larry Santiago Productions, Inc.; Release Date: November 16-25, 1964 at Globe Theatre

Plot Description: Serialized in Bulaklak comics and made into a motion picture in 1964, Sa Bawat Pintig Ng Puso (With Every Beat of Your Heart) is a story of child, Annabelle played by a young, Vilma Santos and action star, Fernan (Zaldy Zhornack, who occassionally star in drama films). Fernan though that Anabelle was the child of his father (Jose Garcia) to Ludina (Marlene Dauden), Anabelle turned out to be his own child).

Film Achievement: 1964 FAMAS Best Actress – Marlene Dauden; 1964 FAMAS Best Musical Score – Restie Umali; 1964 FAMAS Nomination Best Actor – Zaldy Zshornack; 1964 FAMAS Nomination Best Director – Armando De Guzman; 1964 FAMAS Nomination Best Picture; 1964 FAMAS Nomination Best Supporting Actress – Alona Alegre

Film Reviews: “…Ipinanganak nga marahil si Ma. Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos sa show business dahil sa pagitan ng taping ng “Larawan..” ay nagkasunod-sunod na ang kanyang mga pelikula…“Sa Bawa’t Pintig Ng Puso” ng LSP (Nobyemre 16 – 25, 1964)…ng lumikha ng rekord sa takilya…Makalipas ang mga tatlong buwan, nakatanggap ng maikling sulat si Mama Santos muka lay G. Agra. Naghahanap ang Sampaguita Picutures ng batang babae na gaganap ng mahalagang papel sa “Anak, Ang Iyong Ina!” at isinali ng amain ang pangalan ni Vi. Hindi puwedeng lumiban si Papa Santos sa pinpasukang government office, at ayaw naman nilang mapahiya ang kamag-anak, kaya napilitan si Mama Santos na humingi ng day=off sa opisina (Aguinaldo’s). Pagdating sa studio, wala si G. Agra at nasa location shooting, ngunit totoong naroroon ang pangalan ni Vi, kaya’t pinapasok sila sa tanggapan. Napadaan sa harapan ni Mama Santos si Bella Flores na dala ang script ng “Trudis Liit.” Nagulumihanan si Mama Santos. Binasa niyang muli ang liham ni G. Agra. Mali yata ang napuntahan nila! Akma niyang tatawagin si Vi na noon ay nkikipaglaro sa iba pang mga bata upang yayain na itong umuwi, nang pumasok sina Mommy Vera, Dr. at Mrs. Perez, at Eddie Garcia. At doon nagsimula ang movie career ni Vi na magpahanggang ngayon ay batbat pa rin ng iba’t ibang panunuri, opinyon at konklusiyon…” – Ched P. Gonzales (READ MORE)

“…She also won two Best Actress awards for the films Sa Bawat Pintig ng Puso and Kapag Puso’y Sinugatan. She was also nominated by the FAMAS for an additional times: Best Actress for Mila Rosa, where she won. She was nominated for Best Actress Alipin ng Busabos, and Babae, Ikaw ang Dahilan, where she won again…” – Wikepedia (READ MORE)

“…Sa Bawa’t Pintig ng Puso, 1964 – Vilma, the junior actress, no longer a child, not yet a woman, found her niche in the adult drama troika of Marlene Dauden, Lolita Rodriguez, and Eddie Rodriguez as the proverbial daughter caught in the menage a trois. Good company of dramatic greats. Boring and unchallenging role of a good daughter in forgettable tearjerkers followed: Iginuhit ng Tadhana, De Colores, Kasalanan Kaya? and Sino Ang May Karapatan? (1968)…” – Anonymous (READ MORE)

“…In the ’50s and early ’60s, it would have been difficult, if not impossible, to team up Zaldy Zshornack and Marlene Dauden in a movie. They then belonged to different studies, Zaldy with Premiere and Larry Santiago and Marlene with Sampaguita. Sa Bawat Pintig ng Puso became a reality when the two stars turned freelancers. Marlene was identified with dramatic roles, while Zaldy excelled in action-dramas. Sharing stellar billing with them were Alone Alegre and Sammy Barretto. In ‘very special roles’ were veteran actress Lillian Leonardo and teenage star Vilma Santos…” – RKC, The Philippine Star, 25 January 2015 (READ MORE)

“…Ang ‘Sa Bawa’t Pintig Ng Puso”ng Larry Santiago Productions ay isang natatanging pelikulang makaantig ng damdamin at punong-puno ng mga tagpong naiiba sa karaniwang takbo ng buhay. Pinangungunahan nina Zaldy Zshornack at Marlene Dauden sa kauna-unahang pagtatambal bilang magkasintahan sa puting tabing at sa pamamahala ni direktor Armando de Guzman, pinakamahusay na direktor ng taon, 1963. Kabituin sina Alona Alegre, Sammy Barreto, Jose Garcia at iba pa. Kasaysayan: Jose F. Sibal…” – Video 48, 10 January 2015 (READ MORE)