Filmography: Bato sa Buhangin (1976)

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Basic Information: Directed: Pablo Santiago; Story: Herminio ‘Butch’ Bautista; Screenplay: Fred Navarro; Cast: Fernando Poe Jr., Vilma Santos, Dencio Padilla, Robert Talabis, Millie Mercado, Connie Angeles, Yvonne Salcedo, Tina Monasterio, Jun Soler, Jumbo Salvador, Phillip Salvador, Rowell Santiago; Executive producer: Fernando Poe Jr.; Original Music: Ernani Cuenco; Cinematography: Sergio Lobo; Theme Songs: “Bato sa Buhangin” by Cinderella

Plot Description: An intriguing revelation from a Fortune Teller leads the spoiled Bamba (Vilma Santos) restless to meet her destined Lover. One day, the anxious Bamba comes across the humble Taxi Driver Rafael (Fernando Poe Jr.) after crashing his vehicle on the street. To make up for Bamba’s blunder, Bamba’s father offers the poor Rafael to work as his daughter’s Bodyguard. Being the snotty brat she is, Bamba punishes Rafael by bossing him around and embarrassing him in front of her friends. Through it all, however, Bamba suddenly finds herself irresistibly falling in love with Rafael — the one man who has patiently put up with all her mischief. The only hurdle to Bamba and Rafael’s love story, though, is the secret Bamba has been keeping from everybody all her life – even to her beloved Rafael. Will this secret ruin the chance for Bamba to be with her fated Partner? – Pelikula.net (READ MORE)

Bamba (Vilma Santos) is eager to meet the love of her life after having her fortune told. Fate delivers her to the humble taxi driver, Rafael (Fernando Poe Jr.). And while their relationship is initially strained by Bamba’s poor treatment of Rafael, they inevitably find themselves falling for one another. But Bamba is hiding a secret that she has kept from everyone in her life. Will this secret destroy any and all chance she has to be with the one she is fated to love? – TFC (READ MORE)

Film Achievement: 1976 FAMAS Best Theme Song – Ernani Cuenco for the song “Bato sa Buhangin”

Film Review: “…I really felt very sad as he’s one of the kindest men I ever met. We’ve done three films together. The first one was when I was only 19-years-old, Batya’t Palo-Palo, a big hit. He was the one who taught me how to swim while we were shooting that movie. Before that, I did Dyesebel where I played a mermaid but I didn’t even know how to swim. This was followed by Bato sa Buhangin. Our last film together was Ikaw ang Mahal Ko, which I did after I gave birth to Ryan Christian. Kuya Ronnie is a gentleman in the strictest sense of the word. Talagang maasikaso siya sa lahat ng kasama niya sa shooting and he feeds everyone with great food all the time. He’s fun to work with kasi palabiro siya at masaya talaga kasama. The whole industry will miss him…” – Mario E. Bautista (READ MORE)

Kundiman – “…Although the kundiman (or the love song in Tagalog) and the balad are like sisters by emotional affinity, so to speak, the former is more plaintive than the latter. Whereas the ballad (such asd Jerome Kern’s All the Things You are or David Raksin’s Laura or Victor Young Stella by Starlight) speaks of the anguish of romantic love with the emotions held in full gear, the kundiman is so mournful that it becomes maudlin. In a way, this is not surprising since the Filipino is, by nature, extremely sentimental. No wonder, a local film of the tearjerker variety is milked to excess to the point of nauseato the delight of its audience. The kundiman, then, fits perfectly into the innate psyche of the typical Filipino. Tearjerkers in Philippine cinema prior to the outbreak of World War II on Dec 8, 1941 were understandably lachrymose to the nth degree and were studded with the necessary kundiman…Kapalaran (music by Orly Ilacad and lyrics by Ernie de la Pena) was recorded by Rico J. Puno in 1976 and sang in Inday Garutay, a Trixia Gomez starrer. The meaningful lyrics embellished by the bewitching melody created an emotional carthasis on the sensitive listener. That same year, Bato sa Buhangin (an Ernani Cuenco composition), which starred Fernando Poe Jr. and Vilma Santos, was also shown. As sung by Cinderella (or Yolly Samson) in the single, Bato sa Buhangin, fought it out with Kapalaran in jukeboxes and on the airlanes, aside from the mouths of people who date on the beauty of melodies falling under the label of the kundiman…” – Leo P. Sergio, Manila Standard, 01 April 1988 p11 (READ MORE)

Filmography: Coed (1979)

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Basic Information: Directed: Emmanuel H. Borlaza; Story, screenplay: Allan Jayme Rabaya; Cast: Vilma Santos, Jay Ilagan, Celia Rodriguez, Allan Valenzuela, Romeo Enriquez, Romeo Rivera, Jun Soler, Angge, Jojo Santiago, Cora Tanada, Larry Leviste, Marilyn Villarruz, Rosemarie Sarita; Original Music: George Canseco; Cinematography: Mike Accion; Film Editing: Abelardo Hulleza

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: Borlaza gave Vilma Santos her very first best actress, winning the 1972 FAMAS for via Dama De Noche. He is also credited in narrowing the popularity gap between her and the musical era’s darling of the 70s, Nora Aunor.

Film Review: “…Sabi ni Mama Santos, ako daw ang “pumatay” sa kanilang Pagputi…eto ang parusa ko, bigyan ko daw sila ng isang Kampus? so I’m making for them Coed. You see, when I was working on Kampus? at UP Los Banos, I realized their problems and lifestyle can be a source of even 10 movie materials. At kapag ang student force pala ang nag-patronize sa Tagalog movie, ang laki ng audience!” Borlaza revealed…I’m very meticulous about is: the audience were to identify itself with my main character, will it be happy with the poetic justice I execute? Will they find it correct and realistic? In Kampus? for instance, students who were pleased with the movie told me they liked the ending very much. They agreed with it. Vilma was bedded first by Mat Ranillo III, but ended up with Bembol who was the right choice after all. They say in real life, the man you walk down the aisle with is not necessarily the first man you had sex with. Also they say the dialouges were very in – like the way actual students would speak them. Siguro, once they sit in the theater, they are not bothered by such questions as ‘Why” or “how come?” Is the star value the main thing in selling movies? “In the case of Kampus?, yes, because Vilma Santos was my main star and she’s the current box office queen…” – Manny B. Fernandez, Expressweek, November 9, 1978 (READ MORE)

“…Borlaza’s films lack the arthouse style and social relevance that critics loves most in a Brocka or Bernal films but who cares about the critics when the paying public loves them. And the producers demand his service, from Doc Perez of Sampaguita Pictures, Atty. Esperidion Laxa of Tagalog Ilang Ilang Productions and later on, Vic Del Rosario of Viva Films and Lily Monteverde of Regal Films. Clearly, his films exists with one purpose, to entertain the masses not to depress or remind them with the country’s sad fate of economy or the below poverty line lives of many. The success of the Vilma-Borlaza films gave Vilma Santos versatility and preparation to a more serious acting career. It also narrowed the popularity gap between her and the musical era’s darling of the 70s, Nora Aunor. These are perhaps, the most significant contributions of Emmanuel Borlaza to Vilma’s career. Vilma who was considered only second to Nora couldn’t matched her singing talent and so, Borlaza countered this lack of singing with films that showcased Vilma’s acting versatility…” – RV (READ MORE)

Jay Ilagan (March 6, 1953 – February 3, 1992) is a Filipino actor. He hosted Stop, Look and Listen and starred in My Son, My Son and Going Bananas. He was married and separated with another popular movie personality Hilda Koronel and a common-law husband of Amy Austria at the time of his death. He died in a motorcycle accident in 1992. He was 39. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)