Top 100 Vilma Santos Films (part three)

Spanning five decades with 197 films credits and almost two hundred awards, Vilma Santos’ filmography is a kaleidoscope picture of changes in times. Different genres, from teen musicals, folksy fantasies, campy horrors, animated actions to mature adult dramas, her films demonstrated her inner acting talents honed by directors, maneuvered by film producers/benefactors (who some are no longer with us) and supported by her ever loyal fanatics. The results were a long list of film titles that covered several social relevance that capture each decades. A long list of record-breaking box office returns that gave her the title, “the longest reigning box office queen of all time.” A long list of films that sustained her career to different transformation, ensuring her longevity no other Filipino movie queen ever enjoyed. We have painstakingly choose the best of the best. Basing our selection with three criteria. First, the financial success of the film. Cliche it maybe, financial success sustained her bankability and longevity. Second is the critical recognitions the film received. Third, is the other factors that contribute to the overall success of the film, namely, relevance, entertainment value, and the question of, is this film a career milestone or is this film contributed to her popularity. Here are Vilma Santos’ top 100 films.

Total score consists of (A) 10 points for box office records, (B) 10 points for critics recognitions, (C) 10 relevance/longevity, (D) “other factors” that contribute to overall success, gives us total score of 30 points.

RANK, MOVIE TITLE, YR, DIRECTOR’S NAME, SCORE = (A) + (B) + (C) + (D)

80.  Modelong Tanso 1979
SCORE: 3(A) + 10(B) + 6(C) + 0.6(D) = 19.6(T)
Directed by Cirio H. Santiago, co-starring: Charito Solis, Winnie Santos. Entry to 1979 Metro Manila Film Festival – MORE INFO

79.  Nakawin Natin ang Bawat Sandali 1978
SCORE: 6(A) + 7(B) + 6(C) + 0.7(D) = 19.7(T)
Directed by Elwood Perez, co-starring: Baby Delgado, Anita LindaChristopher De Leon, Roel Vergel de Dios, Freddie Yance, Romeo Rivera – MORE INFO (no available video)

78.  Mga Rosas sa Putikan 1976
SCORE: 6(A) + 7(B) + 6(C) + 0.8(D) = 19.8(T)
Directed by Emmanuel H. Borlaza, co-starring: Celia Rodriguez, Babara Luna, Trixia Gomez, Merle Fernandez, Monica Morena, Romeo Enriquez, Arnold Gamboa, Sandy Garcia, Ike Lozada. Vilma sings the film theme song! – MORE INFO

77.  Kasalanan Kaya? 1968
SCORE: 6(A) + 8(B) + 5(C) + 0.9(D) = 19.9(T)
Directed by Luis Enriquez, co-starring: Lolita Rodriguez, Marlene Dauden and Eddie Rodriguez with Roderick Paulate. Vilma received acting nomination for best supporting actress in 1968 FAMAS. – MORE INFO (no available video)

76.  Good Morning, Sunshine 1980
SCORE: 6(A) + 7(B) + 7(C) + 0.07(D) = 20.07(T)
Directed by Ishmael Bernal, co-starring: Sheryl Cruz, Debraliz, Anita Linda, Liza LorenaJunior, Lloyd Samartino – MORE INFO

75.  Biktima 1974
SCORE: 5(A) + 10(B) + 5(C) + 0.08(D) = 20.08(T)
Directed by Nilo Saez, co-starring: Helen Gamboa, Celia Rodriguez, Perla Bautista, Cristina Reyes, Divina Valencia Leopoldo Salcedo, Bert Leroy Jr., Tony Santos Jr., Yoyoy Villame, Tommy Abuel, Edgar Mortiz, Ike Lozada, German Moreno – MORE INFO

74.  Promo Girl 1978
SCORE: 6(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.09(D) = 20.09(T)
Directed by Joey Gosiengfiao, co-starring: Ricky Belmonte, Roel vergel De Dios, Eddie Gutierrez, Bembol Rocco – MORE INFO (no available video)

73.  Simula ng Walang Katapusan 1978
SCORE: 6(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.1(D) = 20.1(T)
Directed by Luis Enriquez, co-starring: Eddie Rodriguez, Carmen Soriano, Patria Plata, Ingrid Salas, Rio Locsin, Lito Anzures, Renato Robles, Nello Nayo, Ruben Rustia – MORE INFO (no available video)

72.  Anak ng Aswang 1973
SCORE: 4(A) + 10(B) + 6(C) + 0.2(D) = 20.2(T)
Directed by Romy Susara cp-starring: Gloria Romero, Daisy Romualdez, Rosanna Marquez, Lucita Soriano, Lita RodriguezEdgar Mortiz, Nick Romano, Leopoldo Salcedo, German Moreno, Pons De Guzman – MORE INFO (no available video)

71.  Magkaribal 1979
SCORE: 6(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.3(D) = 20.3(T)
Directed by Elwood Perez, co-starring: Alma Moreno, Christopher De Leon – MORE INFO

RECAP:
80. Modelong Tanso 1979
79. Nakawin Natin ang Bawat Sandali 1978
78. Mga Rosas sa Putikan 1976
77. Kasalanan Kaya? 1968
76. Good Morning, Sunshine 1980
75. Biktima 1974
74. Promo Girl 1978
73. Simula ng Walang Katapusan 1978
72. Anak ng Aswang 1973
72. Magkaribal 1979

…continue with countdown, CLICK HERE!

Top 100 Vilma Santos Films (part eight)

Spanning five decades with 197 films credits and almost two hundred awards, Vilma Santos’ filmography is a kaleidoscope picture of changes in times. Different genres, from teen musicals, folksy fantasies, campy horrors, animated actions to mature adult dramas, her films demonstrated her inner acting talents honed by directors, maneuvered by film producers/benefactors (who some are no longer with us) and supported by her ever loyal fanatics. The results were a long list of film titles that covered several social relevance that capture each decades. A long list of record-breaking box office returns that gave her the title, “the longest reigning box office queen of all time.” A long list of films that sustained her career to different transformation, ensuring her longevity no other Filipino movie queen ever enjoyed. We have painstakingly choose the best of the best. Basing our selection with three criteria. First, the financial success of the film. Cliche it maybe, financial success sustained her bankability and longevity. Second is the critical recognitions the film received. Third, is the other factors that contribute to the overall success of the film, namely, relevance, entertainment value, and the question of, is this film a career milestone or is this film contributed to her popularity. Here are Vilma Santos’ top 100 films.

Total score consists of (A) 10 points for box office records, (B) 10 points for critics recognitions, (C) 10 relevance/longevity, (D) “other factors” that contribute to overall success, gives us total score of 30 points.

RANK, MOVIE TITLE, YR, DIRECTOR’S NAME, SCORE = (A) + (B) + (C) + (D)

30.  Ex-Wife 1981
SCORE: 8(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.09(D) = 24.09(T)
Directed by Luis Enriquez, starring: Beth Bautista, Liz Alindogan, Wendy villarica, Rosemarie Gil, Lucita Soriano, Raul Aragon, Michael de Mesa, Eddie Garcia, Fred Montilla. – MORE INFO

29.  Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon 1977
SCORE: 7(A) + 7(B) + 10(C) + 0.1(D) = 24.1(T)
Directed by Ishmael Bernal. co-starring: Romeo Vasquez, Mat Ranillo III, Anita Linda, Mary Walter, Fred Montilla – MORE INFO (no available video)

28.  Sinungaling Mong Puso 1992
SCORE: 8(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.2(D) = 24.2(T)
Directed by Maryo J. De Los Reyes, co-starring: Gabby Concepcion, Aga Muhlach, Alice Dixon, Aiko Melendez, Melinda Mendez, Mila Ocampo, Luz Valdez, Ricardo Cepeda, Charlie Davao, Philip Gamboa, Orestes Ojeda. Written by Jose Javier D. Reyes. Vilma received a best actress nomination from the Manunuri. – MORE INFO

27.  Hahamakin Lahat 1990
SCORE: 8(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.3(D) = 24.3(T)
Directed by Lino Brocka, co-starring: Gabby Concepcion, Eric Quizon, Dennis Roldan, Snooky Serna, Perla Bautista, Maritoni Fernandez, Gina Perez, Ruben Rustia. Written by Ricardo Lee. Vilma received an academy award (Luna) nomination for best actress – MORE INFO

26.  Karma 1981
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.4(D) = 24.4(T)
Directed by Danny Zialcita. co-starring: Ronaldo Valdez, Tommy Abuel, Christopher Deleon, Dante Rivero, Chanda Romero, Marianne Delariva, Aurora Salve, Suzanne Gonzales, Martha Sevilla, Odette Khan, Virginia Montes, Bella Flores, Etang Ditcher, Vic Silayan, Fred Montilla, Renato Robles, Ruel Vernal, Augusto Victa, Butch Aquino. Vilma Santos won the 1981 Metro Manila Film Festival Best Actress. – MORE INFO

25.  Pakawalan Mo Ako 1981
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.5(D) = 24.5(T)
Directed by Elwood Perez, co-starring: Christopher De Leon, Anthony Castelo, Deborah Sun, Mila Ocampo, Subas Herrero, Ed Villapol. Vilma Santos won the 1981 FAMAS Best Actress – MORE INFO

24.  Mano Po 3 My Love 2004
SCORE: 8(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.6(D) = 24.6(T)
Directed by Joel Lamangan, co-starring: Christopher De Leon, Jay Manalo, Boots Anson-Roa, Amy Austria, Sheryl Cruz, Jean Garcia, Karylle, Angel Locsin, Angelica Panganiban, Cherry Pie Picache, Carlo Aquino, Eddie Garcia, Patrick Garcia, Allan Paule, John Prats, Dennis Trillo, Gardo Versoza. Vilma Santos won the best actress from the Metro Manila Film Festival, the PMPC STAR and the Gawad Suri. She also received a Luna nomination. The film was the Philippines’ Official Entry to the 2005 8th Shanghai International Film Festival. – MORE INFO

23.  Ipagpatawad Mo 1991
SCORE: 8(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.7(D) = 24.7(T)
Directed by Laurice Guillen, co-starring: Christopher De Leon, Charito Solis, Bing Loyzaga, Amy Perez, Delia Razon, Ruby Rodriguez, Vivian Foz, Lorli Villanueva, Joonee Gamboa, Johnny Wilson, Terence Baylon. Written by Olivia M. Lamasan. Vilma received the 1991 Gawad Urian Best Actress and a nomination from FAP – MORE INFO

22.  Saan Nagtatago Ang Pag-ibig? 1987
SCORE: 8(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.8(D) = 24.8(T)
Directed by Eddie Garcia, co-starring: Ricky Davao, Tonton Gutierrez, Cherrie Gil, Gloria Romero, Alicia Vergel. Alicia Alonzo, Perla Bautista, Suzanne Gonzales, Rose Rosado, Vangie Labalan, Jonee Gamboa, Rey Hipolito, Eddie Arenas. Written by Gilda Olvidado. – MORE INFO

21.  In My Life 2009
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.9(D) = 24.9(T)
Directed by Olivia M. Lamasan, co-starring: John Lloyd Cruz, Luis Manzano, Tirso Cruz III. Vilma Santos received the best actress from Gawad Tanglaw and PMPC Star. She also received nominations from the Golden Screen and Gawad URIAN. The film Earned P20M on its first day of showing in Metro Manila. – MORE INFO

RECAP:
30. Ex-Wife 1981
29. Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon 1977
28. Sinungaling Mong Puso 1992
27. Hahamakin Lahat 1990
26. Karma 1981
25. Pakawalan Mo Ako 1981
24. Mano Po 3 My Love 2004
23. Ipagpatawad Mo 1991
22. Saan Nagtatago Ang Pag-ibig? 1987
21. In My Life 2009

…continue with countdown, CLICK HERE!

Top 100 Vilma Santos Films (part two)

Spanning five decades with 197 films credits and almost two hundred awards, Vilma Santos’ filmography is a kaleidoscope picture of changes in times. Different genres, from teen musicals, folksy fantasies, campy horrors, animated actions to mature adult dramas, her films demonstrated her inner acting talents honed by directors, maneuvered by film producers/benefactors (who some are no longer with us) and supported by her ever loyal fanatics. The results were a long list of film titles that covered several social relevance that capture each decades. A long list of record-breaking box office returns that gave her the title, “the longest reigning box office queen of all time.” A long list of films that sustained her career to different transformation, ensuring her longevity no other Filipino movie queen ever enjoyed. We have painstakingly choose the best of the best. Basing our selection with three criteria. First, the financial success of the film. Cliche it maybe, financial success sustained her bankability and longevity. Second is the critical recognitions the film received. Third, is the other factors that contribute to the overall success of the film, namely, relevance, entertainment value, and the question of, is this film a career milestone or is this film contributed to her popularity. Here are Vilma Santos’ top 100 films.

Total score consists of (A) 10 points for box office records, (B) 10 points for critics recognitions, (C) 10 relevance/longevity, (D) “other factors” that contribute to overall success, gives us total score of 30 points.

RANK, MOVIE TITLE, YR, DIRECTOR’S NAME, SCORE = (A) + (B) + (C) + (D)

90.  Coed  1979
SCORE: 6(A) + 7(B) + 5(C) + 0.6(D) = 18.6(T)
Directed by Emmanuel H. Borlaza, co-starring: Celia Rodriguez, Angge Jay Ilagan, Allan Valenzuela, Romeo Enriquez, Romeo Rivera, Jun Soler – MORE INFO  (no available video)

89.  Kampus  1978
SCORE: 6(A) + 7(B) + 5(C) + 0.7(D) = 18.7(T)
Directed by Emmanuel H. Borlaza, co-starring: Liza Lorena, Anita Linda, Lorli Villanueva, Ann Villegas, Angie magbanua, Rosemarie De VeraBembol Roco, Mat Ranillo III, Allan Valenzuela, Freddie Yance, Lito Lapid. – MORE INFO

88.  Ikaw Lamang  1971
SCORE: 6(A) + 7(B) + 5(C) + 0.8(D) = 18.8(T)
Directed by Luis Enriquez, co-starring: Connie Angeles, Paolo Romero, Robert Talabis, Raul Aragon, Eddie Garcia, Vic Silayan. – MORE INFO (no available video)

87.  Ito ang Pilipino  1967
SCORE: 6(A) + 7(B) + 5(C) + 0.9(D) = 18.9(T)
Directed by Cesar Gallardo, co-starring: Barbara Perez, Gloria Sevilla, Anita LindaJoseph Estrada, Mario Montenegro, Eddie Garcia, Vic Silayan, Eddie Infante, Romy Diaz, Jose Padilla Jr., Lou Salvador Jr, Jay Ilagan – MORE INFO  (no available video)

86.  Young Love  1970
SCORE: 2(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.09(D) = 19.09(T)
Directed by Tony Cayado, starring: Nora Aunor, Tirso Cruz III, Edgar Mortiz with Bella Flores, Etang Discher, Angge, Ike Lozada, German Moreno, Raul Aragon – MORE INFO

85.  Kamay na Gumagapang  1974
SCORE: 4(A) + 10(B) + 5(C) + 0.1(D) = 19.1(T)
Directed by Tony Cayado, co-starring: Rosemarie Gil, Alicia Alonzo, Matimtiman Cruz, Tita De Villa, Winnie SantosRomeo Miranda, Dick Israel, Jose De Villa, Venchito Galvez – MORE INFO  (no available video)

84.  Pulot-gata, Pwede Kaya?  1977
SCORE: 5(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.2(D) = 19.2(T)
Directed by Leonardo L. Garcia, co-starring: Romeo Vasquez, Suzanne Gonzalez, Paraluman, Tita De Villa, Rodolfo Boy Garcia, Tange, Ruel Vernal – MORE INFO (no available video)

83.  Nag-aapoy na Damdamin  1976
SCORE: 5(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.3(D) = 19.3(T)
Directed by Leonardo L. Garcia, co-starring: Romeo Vasquez, Aurora Salve, Tita De Villa, Walter Navarro, Romy Diaz, Ely Roque, Tintoy, Pepot – MORE INFO (no available video)

82.  Mga Reynang Walang Trono  1976
SCORE: 5(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.4(D) = 19.4(T)
Directed by Crisostomo, Muhlach, co-starring Amalia Fuentez with Eddie Gutierrez, Robert Arevalo, Eddie Garcia, Rudy Fernandez, Rez Cortez, Greg Lozano. Amalia co-directed. – MORE INFO  (no available video)

81.  Darna at Ding  1980
SCORE: 6(A) + 7(B) + 6(C) + 0.5(D) = 19.5(T)
Directed by Erastheo Navoa, Cloyd Robinson, co-starring: Celia Rodriguez, Marissa Delgado, Veronica Jones, Angie Ferro, Moody Diaz, Lily Miraflor, Donna VillaNiño Muhlach, Max Alvarado, Panchito, Bayani Casimiro, Rez Cortez, Teroy de Guzman, Paquito Diaz, Ike Lozada, German Moreno, Palito, Don Pepot, Jimmy Santos, Al Tantay, Tsing Tong Tsai. Fourth Darna Film of Vilma Santos. – MORE INFO (no available video)

RECAP:
90. Coed 1979
89. Kampus 1978
88. Ikaw Lamang 1971
87. Ito ang Pilipino 1967
86. Young Love 1970
85. Kamay na Gumagapang 1974
84. Pulot-gata, Pwede Kaya? 1977
83. Nag-aapoy na Damdamin 1976
82. Mga Reynang Walang Trono 1976
81. Darna at Ding 1980

…continue with countdown, CLICK HERE!

Top 100 Vilma Santos Films (part seven)

Spanning five decades with 197 films credits and almost two hundred awards, Vilma Santos’ filmography is a kaleidoscope picture of changes in times. Different genres, from teen musicals, folksy fantasies, campy horrors, animated actions to mature adult dramas, her films demonstrated her inner acting talents honed by directors, maneuvered by film producers/benefactors (who some are no longer with us) and supported by her ever loyal fanatics. The results were a long list of film titles that covered several social relevance that capture each decades. A long list of record-breaking box office returns that gave her the title, “the longest reigning box office queen of all time.” A long list of films that sustained her career to different transformation, ensuring her longevity no other Filipino movie queen ever enjoyed. We have painstakingly choose the best of the best. Basing our selection with three criteria. First, the financial success of the film. Cliche it maybe, financial success sustained her bankability and longevity. Second is the critical recognitions the film received. Third, is the other factors that contribute to the overall success of the film, namely, relevance, entertainment value, and the question of, is this film a career milestone or is this film contributed to her popularity. Here are Vilma Santos’ top 100 films.

Total score consists of (A) 10 points for box office records, (B) 10 points for critics recognitions, (C) 10 relevance/longevity, (D) “other factors” that contribute to overall success, gives us total score of 30 points.

RANK, MOVIE TITLE, YR, DIRECTOR’S NAME, SCORE = (A) + (B) + (C) + (D)

40. Batya’t Palu-Palo 1974
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.2(D) = 23.2(T)
Directed by Pablo Santiago, co-starring: Fernando Poe Jr.,Mila del Sol, Janine Frias, Lorna Tolentino, Liza Anzures, Angge, Fred Montilla, Dencio Padilla, Phillip Salvador, Liza Anzures, Paquito Diaz, Max Alvarado, Lito Anzures. FPJ and Vilma Santos first film together. A big box-office hit during its theater run in 1974. Vilma sings the film theme song! – MORE INFO

39. Hindi Nakakahiya 1976
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 6(C) + 0.3(D) = 23.3(T)
Directed by Luis Enriquez, co-starring: Eddie Rodriguez, Ernie Garcia, Gloria Romero, Marissa Delgado, Patricia Mijares, Renato Robles, Nello Nayo. Part two of the box office hit, Nakakahiya. – MORE INFO (no available video)

38. Nakakahiya? 1975
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 6(C) + 0.4(D) = 23.4(T)
Directed by Luis Enriquez, co-starring: Eddie Rodriguez, Gloria Romero, Barbara Perez. Vilma received the 1975 Bacolod City Film Festival Best Actress. – MORE INFO (no available video)

37. Bato sa Buhangin 1976
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.5(D) = 23.5(T)
Directed by Pablo Santiago, co-starring: Fernando Poe Jr., Dencio Padilla, Jun Soler, Jumbo Salvador, Phillip Salvador, Rowell Santiago, Millie Mercado, Connie Angeles, Yvonne Salcedo, Tina Monasterio. MORE INFO

36. Ikaw Lang 1993
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.6(D) = 23.6(T)
Directed by Chito S. Roño, co-starring: Ronnie Ricketts, Cesar Montano, with Janine Barredo, Vangie Labalan, Josie Tagle, Evelyn Vargas, Dencio Padilla, Roldan Aquino, Cris Daluz, Mon Fernandez. Written by Bibeth Orteza. Box office hit of 1993. – MORE INFO

35. Miss X 1980
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 6(C) + 0.7(D) = 23.7(T)
Directed by Gil M. Portes, co-starring: Mark Gil. Filmed in the red district of Armsterdam. – MORE INFO (no available video)

34. Kapag Langit Ang Humatol 1990
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.8(D) = 23.8(T)
Directed by Laurice Guillen, co-starring: Richard Gomez, Gloria Romero, Charo Santos-Concio, Kristine Garcia, Carmina Villaroel, Eula Valdez, Metring David, Lillian Laing, Vangie Labalan, Jeffrey Santos, William Lorenzo, Tony Carreon, Terence Baylon. Written by Salvador Royales. Vilma received a best actress nomination from the Manunuri. – MORE INFO

33. Sister Stella L. 1984
SCORE: 10(A) + 3(B) + 10(C) + 0.9(D) = 23.9(T)
Directed by Mike De Leon, co-starring: Gina Alajar, Laurice Guillen, Anita Linda, Liza Lorena, Adul de Leon, Jay Ilagan, Tony Santos Sr., Ruben Rustia, Eddie Infante, Rody Vera, Pen Medina. Vilma Santos recived her third consecutive Gawad Urian best actress. She also received nominationf from FAMAS and FAP. The film was the official Philippines’ entry to the 1985 Venice International Film Festival. – MORE INFO

32. Dyesebel at ang Mahiwagang Kabibe 1973
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 8(C) + 0.07(D) = 24.07(T)
Directed by Emmanuel H. Borlaza, starring: Divina Valencia, Mina Aragon, Rossana Marquez, Chanda Romero, Elizabeth Vaughn, Patria Plata, Romeo Miranda, Joseph Sytangco, Lito Calzado, Ricky Valencia, Ike Lozada, German Moreno, Greg Lozano. 2nd Top Grosser of the 8th Manila Film Festival – READ MORE

31. D’ Lucky Ones 2006
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) +0.08(D) = 24.08(T)
Directed by Wenn V. Deramas, starring: Sandara Park, Pokwang, Eugene Domingo, Nikki Valdez, Candy Pangilinan, Joseph Bitangcol. Box office hit of 2006. A Vilma Santos tribute film – MORE INFO (no available video)

RECAP:
40. Batya’t Palu-Palo 1974
39. Hindi Nakakahiya 1976
38. Nakakahiya? 1975
37. Bato sa Buhangin 1976
36. Ikaw Lang 1993
35. Miss X 1980
34. Kapag Langit Ang Humatol 1990
33. Sister Stella L. 1984
32. Dyesebel at ang Mahiwagang Kabibe 1973
31. D’ Lucky Ones 2006

…continue with countdown, CLICK HERE!

Top 100 Vilma Santos Films (part six)

Spanning five decades with 197 films credits and almost two hundred awards, Vilma Santos’ filmography is a kaleidoscope picture of changes in times. Different genres, from teen musicals, folksy fantasies, campy horrors, animated actions to mature adult dramas, her films demonstrated her inner acting talents honed by directors, maneuvered by film producers/benefactors (who some are no longer with us) and supported by her ever loyal fanatics. The results were a long list of film titles that covered several social relevance that capture each decades. A long list of record-breaking box office returns that gave her the title, “the longest reigning box office queen of all time.” A long list of films that sustained her career to different transformation, ensuring her longevity no other Filipino movie queen ever enjoyed. We have painstakingly choose the best of the best. Basing our selection with three criteria. First, the financial success of the film. Cliche it maybe, financial success sustained her bankability and longevity. Second is the critical recognitions the film received. Third, is the other factors that contribute to the overall success of the film, namely, relevance, entertainment value, and the question of, is this film a career milestone or is this film contributed to her popularity. Here are Vilma Santos’ top 100 films.

Total score consists of (A) 10 points for box office records, (B) 10 points for critics recognitions, (C) 10 relevance/longevity, (D) “other factors” that contribute to overall success, gives us total score of 30 points.

RANK, MOVIE TITLE, YR, DIRECTOR’S NAME, SCORE = (A) + (B) + (C) + (D)

50. Hatinggabi Na, Vilma 1972
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 5(C) + 0.9(D) = 21.9(T)
Directed by Joey Gosiengfiao, co-starring: Barbara Perez, Zeneda Amador, Angie FerroRomeo Rivera, Ruel Vernal, Dick Israel, Ernie Garcia, Cloyd Robinson, Subas Herrero, Lito Trinidad – MORE INFO (no available video)

49. Dama De Noche 1972
SCORE: 7(A) + 7(B) + 7(C) + 0.95(D) = 21.95(T)
Directed by Emmanuel H. Borlaza, co-starring: Edgar Mortiz, Lillian Laing, Matimtiman Cruz, Fred Montilla, Cloyd Robinson. Recieved first FAMAS Best Actress and best actress nomination at the 1972 Quezon City Film Festival. – MORE INFO

48. Darna and the Giants 1973
SCORE: 6(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.2(D) = 22.2(T)
Directed by Emmanuel H. Borlaza, co-starring: Helen Gamboa, Loreta Marquez, Rosanna Marquez, Desiree Destreza, Florence Aguilar Romeo Miranda, Ike Lozada, Pepito Rodriguez, Cesar Ramirez, Zandro Zamora, Max Alvarado. Top Box Office Film of 1973 Metro Manila Film Festival – MORE INFO

47. Kampanerang Kuba 1974
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 6(C) + 0.3(D) = 22.3(T)
Directed by Nilo Saez, co-starring: Edgar Mortiz, Patria Plata, Metring David, Greg Lozano, Joaquin Fajardo. – MORE INFO

46. Muling Buksan ang Puso 1985
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 7(C) + 0.4(D) = 22.4(T)
Directed by Leroy Salvador, co-starring: Dindo Fernando, Lorna Tolentino, Sandy Andolong, Coney Reyes, Rowell Santiago, Jimi Melendez. Written by Nerissa Cabral. Vilma received a best actress nomination from 1985 FAMAS – MORE INFO

45. Palimos Ng Pag-ibig 1986
SCORE: 7(A) + 8 (B)+7 (C)+0.5 (D)=22.5(T)
Directed by Eddie Garcia, co-starring: Dina Bonnevie, Cherie Gil, Laurice GuillenEdu Manzano, Pepito Rodriguez. Written by Nerissa Cabral. – MORE INFO

44. Langis at Tubig 1980
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 7(C) + 0.6(D) = 22.6(T)
Directed by Danny Zialcita, co-starring: Amy Austria, Lucita Soriano, Suzanne Gonzales, Adul De Leon, Martha SevillaDindo Fernando, Ronaldo Valdez, George Estregan, Ruben Rustia, Johnny Vicar, Augusto Victa, Vic Diaz, Vic Silayan, Mario Escudero. Vilma received a best actress nomination from 1980 FAMAS – MORE INFO

43.Pinay, American Style 1979
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 7(C) + 0.7(D) = 22.7(T)
Directed by Elwood Perez, co-starring: Christopher De Leon, Bembol Roco, Cocoy Laurel with Rosa Mia, Alexandra Dulaney, Nova Villa, Bella Flores, Angge. One of eight box office hit films Vilma Santos did in 1979 – MORE INFO

42.Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos 1988
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 7(C) + 0.8(D) = 22.8(T)
Directed by Elwood Perez, co-starring: Eric Quizon, Gary Valenciano, Miguel Rodriguez, Eddie Garcia, Nida Blanca, Barbara Perez, Nadia Montenegro, Armida Siguion-Reyna, Perla Bautista, Rachel Ann Wolfe, Deborah Sun, Vangie Labalan, Nena Perez Rubio, Ruben Rustia. Written by Orlando Nadres. Vilma recieved her fifth FAMAS best actress that earned her the FAMAS Hall of Fame award. She also received a film academy nomination. – MORE INFO

41.Haplos 1982
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 7(C) + 0.9(D) = 22.9(T)
Directed by Antonio Jose Perez, co-starring: Christopher De Leon, Rio Locsin, Delia Razon, Eddie Infante, Rez Cortez, Juan Rodrigo, Jaime Fabregas. Written by Ricardo Lee. The film won the 1982 Metro Manila Film Festival 3rd Best Picture award. – READ MORE

RECAP:
50. Hatinggabi Na, Vilma 1972
49. Dama De Noche 1972
48. Darna and the Giants 1973
47. Kampanerang Kuba 1974
46. Muling Buksan ang Puso 1985
45. Palimos Ng Pag-ibig 1986
44. Langis at Tubig 1980
43. Pinay, American Style 1979
42. Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos 1988
41. Haplos 1982

…continue with countdown, CLICK HERE!

Top 100 Vilma Santos Films (part five)

Spanning five decades with 197 films credits and almost two hundred awards, Vilma Santos’ filmography is a kaleidoscope picture of changes in times. Different genres, from teen musicals, folksy fantasies, campy horrors, animated actions to mature adult dramas, her films demonstrated her inner acting talents honed by directors, maneuvered by film producers/benefactors (who some are no longer with us) and supported by her ever loyal fanatics. The results were a long list of film titles that covered several social relevance that capture each decades. A long list of record-breaking box office returns that gave her the title, “the longest reigning box office queen of all time.” A long list of films that sustained her career to different transformation, ensuring her longevity no other Filipino movie queen ever enjoyed. We have painstakingly choose the best of the best. Basing our selection with three criteria. First, the financial success of the film. Cliche it maybe, financial success sustained her bankability and longevity. Second is the critical recognitions the film received. Third, is the other factors that contribute to the overall success of the film, namely, relevance, entertainment value, and the question of, is this film a career milestone or is this film contributed to her popularity. Here are Vilma Santos’ top 100 films.

Total score consists of (A) 10 points for box office records, (B) 10 points for critics recognitions, (C) 10 relevance/longevity, (D) “other factors” that contribute to overall success, gives us total score of 30 points.

RANK, MOVIE TITLE, YR, DIRECTOR’S NAME, SCORE = (A) + (B) + (C) + (D)

60.  Mga Mata Ni Angelita 1978
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 5(C) + 0.08(D) = 21.08(T)
Directed by Lauro Pacheco, starring: Julie Vega, Gloria Sevilla, Boots Anson-Roa, Alma Moreno, Rosanna Ortiz, Nora Aunor, Trixia Gomez, Marissa Delgado, Etang DischerMat Ranillo III, Roldan Rodrigo, Christopher De Leon, German Moreno, Rez Cortez, Eddie Rodriguez, Dolphy, Fernando Poe Jr. Vilma’s segments made this film in our list of memorable non-lead role. – MORE INFO

59.  Rock, Baby, Rock 1979
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 5(C) + 0.09(D) = 21.09(T)
Directed by Oscar Miranda, starring: Leah Navarro, Lorli Villanueva, Geleen EugenioJunior, Rolly Quizon, Tito Sotto, Vic Sotto, Joey de Leon, Val Sotto, VST & Company – MORE INFO

58.  Hiwalay 1981
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.1(D) = 21.1(T)
Directed by Romy Susara, starring: Dindo Fernando, Eddie Rodriguez – MORE INFO (no available video)

57.  Susan Kelly, Edad 20 1977
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 5(C) + 0.2(D) = 21.2(T)
Directed by Maria Saret, starring: Laila Dee, Dante Rivero, Anthony Alonzo, Romeo Enriquez, Chito Ponce Enrile, Cloyd Robinson, Sandy Garcia, Laila Dee, Ramon Zamora – MORE INFO (no available video)

56.  Hindi Nahahati ang Langit 1966
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.3(D) = 21.3(T)
Directed by Lauro Pacheco, starring: Lolita Rodriguez, Marlene Dauden, Eddie Rodriguez – MORE INFO (no available video)

55.  Masarap, Masakit ang Umibig 1977
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.4(D) = 21.4(T)
Directed by Elwood Perez, co-starring: Christopher De Leon, Mat Ranillo III with Anita Linda, Ma-An Hontiveros, Lillian Laing, Laila Dee, Amado Cortez, Sandy Garcia, Cloyd Robinson. Official Philippines’ entry to the 1981 ASEAN Film Festival and Sydney Film Festival. Official entry to 1978 Asia-Pacific Film Festival in Taipei. – MORE INFO

54.  Minsan pa Natin Hagkan Ang Nakaraan 1983
SCORE: 7(A) + 7(B) + 7(C) + 0.5(D) = 21.5(T)
Directed by Marilou Diaz-Abaya, co-starring: Christopher De Leon, Eddie Garcia. – MORE INFO

53.  Halik sa Kamay, Halik sa Paa 1979
SCORE: 7(A) + 7(B) + 7(C) + 0.6(D) = 21.6(T)
Directed by Luis Enriquez, co-starring: Rosemarie Gil, Ester Chavez, Angie Ferro, Angge, Virginia Montez, Aurora SalveRonald Corveau, Eddie Rodriguez, Jose Vergara, Roderick Paulate. Vilma recieved a best actress nominationf from 1979 FAMAS. – MORE INFO

52.  Alyas Baby Tsina 1984
SCORE: 7(A) + 7(B) + 7(C) + 0.7(D) = 21.7(T)
Directed by Marilou Diaz-Abaya, co-starring: Phillip Salvador, Dindo Fernando withZeny Zabala, Cecille Castillo, Chanda Romero, Raquel Villavicencio, Caridad Sanchez, Maria Isabel Lopez, Dexter Doria, Mary Walter, Vangie Labalan, Harlene Bautista, Rez Cortez, Rolando Tinio, Len Santos, Johnny Delgado – MORE INFO (no available video)

51.  T-Bird at Ako 1982
SCORE: 7(A) + 7(B) + 7(C) + 0.8(D) = 21.8(T)
Directed by Danny Zialcita, co-starring: Nora Aunor, Baby Delgado, Rosemarie Gil, Suzanne Gonzales, Odette Khan, Anita Linda, Liza Lorena, Adul de Leon, Rustica Carpio, Anita LindaDindo Fernando, Tommy Abuel, Tony Carreon, Alvin Enriquez. Written by Portia Ilagan. – MORE INFO

RECAP:
60. Mga Mata Ni Angelita 1978
59. Rock, Baby, Rock 1979
58. Hiwalay 1981
57. Susan Kelly, Edad 20 1977
56. Hindi Nahahati ang Langit 1966
55. Masarap, Masakit ang Umibig 1977
54. Minsan pa Natin Hagkan Ang Nakaraan 1983
53. Halik sa Kamay, Halik sa Paa 1979
52. Alyas Baby Tsina 1984
51. T-Bird at Ako 1982

…continue with countdown, CLICK HERE!

Top 100 Vilma Santos Films (part nine)

Spanning five decades with 197 films credits and almost two hundred awards, Vilma Santos’ filmography is a kaleidoscope picture of changes in times. Different genres, from teen musicals, folksy fantasies, campy horrors, animated actions to mature adult dramas, her films demonstrated her inner acting talents honed by directors, maneuvered by film producers/benefactors (who some are no longer with us) and supported by her ever loyal fanatics. The results were a long list of film titles that covered several social relevance that capture each decades. A long list of record-breaking box office returns that gave her the title, “the longest reigning box office queen of all time.” A long list of films that sustained her career to different transformation, ensuring her longevity no other Filipino movie queen ever enjoyed. We have painstakingly choose the best of the best. Basing our selection with three criteria. First, the financial success of the film. Cliche it maybe, financial success sustained her bankability and longevity. Second is the critical recognitions the film received. Third, is the other factors that contribute to the overall success of the film, namely, relevance, entertainment value, and the question of, is this film a career milestone or is this film contributed to her popularity. Here are Vilma Santos’ top 100 films.

Total score consists of (A) 10 points for box office records, (B) 10 points for critics recognitions, (C) 10 relevance/longevity, (D) “other factors” that contribute to overall success, gives us total score of 30 points.

RANK, MOVIE TITLE, YR, DIRECTOR’S NAME, SCORE = (A) + (B) + (C) + (D)

20.  Tag-ulan sa Tag-araw 1975
SCORE: 8(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.4(D) = 25.4(T)
Directed by Celso Ad. Castillo, co-starring:  Christopher De Leon, Eddie Garcia, Joseph Sytangco, Lorli Villanueva, Odette Khan, Alma Moreno, Eva Darren, Edna Diaz, Nympha Bonifacio, Joonee Gamboa, Rez Cortez, Soxy Topacio.  The first film of Christopher Deleon and Vilma Santos, as of 2008, total 23 films. – MORE INFO

19.  Sinasamba Kita 1982
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 8(C) + 0.5(D) = 25.5(T)
Directed by Eddie Garcia, co-starring:  Christopher Deleon, Philip Salvador, Lorna Tolentino, Irene Celebre, Loleta Abesamis, Norma Blancaflor, Moody Diaz, Luz Fernandez, Kristina Paner, Yvonne, Ramil Rodriguez, Danny De Cordova, Larry Leviste, Fanny Serrano.  Written by Gilda Olvidado.  1982 Top Box Office Record Breaker.  The original film became a TV movie in 2007 by GMA Network, directed by Joel Lamangan, starring Sheryl Cruz as Divina and Valerie Concepcion as Nora. – MORE INFO

18.  Paano Ba ang Mangarap? 1983
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 8(C) + 0.6(D) = 25.6(T)
Directed by Eddie Garcia, co-starring:  Christopher Deleon, Jay Ilagan, Amy Austria, Perla Bautista, Armida Siguion Reyna, Vic Silayan.  Written by Nerissa Cabral.  Broke box office record of 1983 – MORE INFO

17.  Gaano Kadalas ang Minsan? 1982
SCORE: 8(A) + 10(B) + 7(C) + 0.7(D) = 25.7(T)
Directed by Danny Zialcita, co-starring:  Dindo Fernando, Hilda Koronel, Chanda Romero, Suzanne Gonsales, Tommy Abuel, Mark Joseph Enriquez.  Broke box office record of 1982, Earned P7.3 million during its first day of showing in Metro Manila – MORE INFO

16.  Trudis Liit 1963
SCORE: 7(A) + 10(B) + 8(C) + 0.8(D) = 25.8(T)
Directed by Jose De Villa, co-starring: Luis Gonzales, Lolita Rodriguez, Connie Angeles, Bella Flores, Charlie Davao, Ramon D’Salva.  Written by Mars Ravelo.  This film is immortalized in small screen in 2010 by GMA 7 .  A remake was filmed in the 1990s.  Vilma Sanots won a FAMAS Best Child Actress.  – MORE INFO (no available video)

15.  Pagputi ng Uwak, Pag-itim ng Tagak 1978
SCORE: 10(A) + 5(B) + 10(C) + 0.9(D) = 25.9(T)
Directed by Celso Ad. Castillo, co-starring:  Bembol Roco, Angie Ferro, Olivia O’Hara, Mona Lisa, Robert Talabis, Joonee Gamboa, Mario Escudero.  As the film producer, Vilma received the highest recognition for best film of the year FAMAS and Gawad URIAN.  She also received a nomination for best actress from FAMAS. – MORE INFO

14.  Adultery: Aida Macaraeg 1984
SCORE: 10(A) + 8(B) + 8(C) + 0.6(D) = 26.6(T)
Directed by Lino Brocka, co-starring:  Phillip Salvador, Anita Linda, Deborah Sun, Alvin Enriquez, Mario Montenegro.  Vilma received best actress nomination from PMPC Star Awards. – READ MORE

13.  Tagos ng Dugo  1987
SCORE: 8(A) + 10(B) + 8(C) + 0.7(D) = 26.7(T)
Directed by Maryo J. De los Reyes, co-starring:  Caridad Sanchez, Lucita Soriano, Alicia Alonzo, Mia Gutierrez, Raquel VillavicencioMichael De Mesa, Miguel Rodriguez, Francis Arnaiz, Richard Gomez, Mark Joseph, Lito Pimentel, Joey Hipolito, Joey Marquez, Tony Santos Sr.  Vilma Santos won the 1987 FAMAS and CMMA Best Actress awards.  She also received nomination from FAP. – MORE INFO

12.  Anak 2000
SCORE: 8(A) + 10(B) + 8(C) + 0.8(D) = 26.8(T)
Directed by Rory B. Quintos, co-starring: Claudine Barretto, Amy Austria, Cherry Pie Picache, Sheila Mae Alvero, Tess Dumpit, Jodi Sta. Maria Joel Torre, Baron Geisler, Leandro Muñoz, Gino Paul Guzman, Cris Michelena.  Philippines’ official entry to 73rd best foreign language OSCAR.  Philippines’ official entries to 2001 international film festivals including Fukuoka, San Francisco.  Vilma received the 2000 PMPC STAR award for best actress as well as the 2000 PASADO and nomination from FAP.  She was also crowned the 2000 GMMSF Box Office Queen.  – MORE INFO

11.  Imortal 1989
SCORE: 8(A) + 10(B) + 8(C) + 0.9(D) = 26.9(T)
Directed by Eddie Garcia, co-starring:  Christopher De Leon, Tommy Abuel, Ricky Davao, Gelli De Belen, Cherie Gil, Jacklyn Jose, Liza Lorena Richard Reynoso, Roi Vinzon.  Written by Orlando Nadres.  Vilma won the 1989 Metro Manila Film Festival Best Actress. –  MORE INFO

RECAP:
20. Tag-ulan sa Tag-araw 1975
19. Sinasamba Kita 1982
18. Paano Ba ang Mangarap? 1983
17. Gaano Kadalas ang Minsan? 1982
16. Trudis Liit 1963
15. Pagputi ng Uwak, Pag-itim ng Tagak 1978
14. Adultery: Aida Macaraeg 1984
13. Tagos ng Dugo 1987
12. Anak 2000
11. Imortal 1989

…continue with countdown, CLICK HERE!

Top 100 Vilma Santos Films (part four)

Spanning five decades with 197 films credits and almost two hundred awards, Vilma Santos’ filmography is a kaleidoscope picture of changes in times. Different genres, from teen musicals, folksy fantasies, campy horrors, animated actions to mature adult dramas, her films demonstrated her inner acting talents honed by directors, maneuvered by film producers/benefactors (who some are no longer with us) and supported by her ever loyal fanatics. The results were a long list of film titles that covered several social relevance that capture each decades. A long list of record-breaking box office returns that gave her the title, “the longest reigning box office queen of all time.” A long list of films that sustained her career to different transformation, ensuring her longevity no other Filipino movie queen ever enjoyed. We have painstakingly choose the best of the best. Basing our selection with three criteria. First, the financial success of the film. Cliche it maybe, financial success sustained her bankability and longevity. Second is the critical recognitions the film received. Third, is the other factors that contribute to the overall success of the film, namely, relevance, entertainment value, and the question of, is this film a career milestone or is this film contributed to her popularity. Here are Vilma Santos’ top 100 films.

Total score consists of (A) 10 points for box office records, (B) 10 points for critics recognitions, (C) 10 relevance/longevity, (D) “other factors” that contribute to overall success, gives us total score of 30 points.

RANK, MOVIE TITLE, YR, DIRECTOR’S NAME, SCORE = (A) + (B) + (C) + (D)

70.  Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow 1986
SCORE: 6(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.4(D) = 20.4(T)
Directed by Emmanuel H. Borlaza, co-starring: Snooky Serna, Maricel Soriano, Liza Lorena, Chanda Romero, Deborah SunGabby Concepcion, Richard Gomez, Eddie Garcia, Jimi Melendez – MORE INFO

69.  Kay Tagal ng Umaga 1965
SCORE: 6(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.5(D) = 20.5(T)
Directed by Lauro Pacheco, starring: Lolita Rodriguez, Eddie Rodriguez, Marlene Dauden with Vilma Valera. Film adaptation of Aning Bagabaldo’s radio drama broadcasted on DZRH. – MORE INFO (no available video)

68.  Anak, ang Iyong Ina 1963
SCORE: 7(A) + 8(B) + 5(C) + 0.6(D) = 20.6(T)
Directed by Mar S. Torres, co-staring: Gloria Romero, Rita Gomez, Mario Montenegro, Eddie Garcia – MORE INFO (no available video)

67.  Ging 1964
SCORE: 6(A) + 8(B) + 6(C) + 0.7(D) = 20.7(T)
Directed by Cirio H. Santiago, co-starring: Carol Varga, Olivia Cenizal, Jose Padilla jr, Ramon D’Salva. Written by Mars Ravelo. – MORE INFO

66.  Karugtong ang Kahapon 1975
SCORE: 5(A) + 8(B) + 7(C) + 0.8(D) = 20.8(T)
Directed by Fely H. Crisostomo, co-starring: Gloria Romero, Celia Rodriguez, Patria Plata, Edgar Mortiz, Eddie Garcia, Jay Ilagan, Romy Mallari, Joseph Sytangco. Entry to the 1975 MMFF. Film was written by Nerissa Cabral. – MORE INFO (no available video)

65.  Nag-iisang Bituin 1994
SCORE: 7(A) + 7(B) + 6(C) + 0.9(D) = 20.9(T)
Directed by Jose Javier Reyes, co-starring: Christopher De Leon, Aga Muhlach with Cherrie Pie Picache, Amy Perez, Jao Mapa, Orestes Ojeda. Vilma received a best actress nomination from PMPC’s 1994 Star. – MORE INFO (no available video)

64.  Takbo, Vilma, Dali 1972
SCORE: 5(A) + 10(B) + 6(C) + 0.04(D) = 21.04(T)
Directed by Joey Gosiengfiao, co-starring: Rita Gomez, Paquito Diaz, Max Alvarado, Romeo Rivera, Ernie Garcia – MORE INFO (no available video)

63.  Vilma Viente Nueve 1975
SCORE: 5(A) + 10(B) + 6(C) + 0.05(D) = 21.05(T)
Directed by Pablo Santiago, co-starring: Anita Linda, Jun Aristorenas, Max Alvarado, Lito Legaspi, German Moreno, Martin Marfil – MORE INFO (no available video)

62.  Ibong Lukaret 1975
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 5(C) + 0.06(D) = 21.06(T)
Directed by Tito C. Sanchez, co-starring: Alona Alegre, Marissa Delgado, Daria Ramirez, Lucita Soriano, George Estregan, Nick Romano, Rudy Fernandez, Arnold Mendoza – MORE INFO (no available video)

61.  Bertang Kerengkeng 1976
SCORE: 6(A) + 10(B) + 5(C) + 0.07(D) = 21.07(T)
Directed by Tito C. Sanchez, co-starring: Edna Diaz, Lito Anzures, Rudy Fernandez, Greg Lozano – MORE INFO (no available video)

RECAP:
70. Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow 1986
69. Kay Tagal ng Umaga 1965
68. Anak, ang Iyong Ina 1963
67. Ging 1964
66. Karugtong ang Kahapon 1975
65. Nag-iisang Bituin 1994
64. Takbo, Vilma, Dali 1972
63. Vilma Viente Nueve 1975
62. Ibong Lukaret 1975
61. Bertang Kerengkeng 1976

…continue with countdown, CLICK HERE!

Filmography: Burlesk Queen (1977)

“Kung Inutil kayo, Di Inutil kayo. Wala naman tayong magagawa kung yan ang gusto ng Diyos para sa inyo.” – Chato

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Basic Information: Directed: Celso Ad Castillo; Story: Mauro Gia Samonte, Celso Ad Castillo; Screenplay: Mauro Gia Samonte; Cast: Vilma Santos, Rolly Quizon, Rosemarie Gil, Leopoldo Salcedo, Roldan Aquino, Chito Ponce Enrile, Dexter Doria, Yolanda Luna, Joonee Gamboa; Original Music: George Canseco; Cinematography: Benjamin L. Lobo; Film Editing: Abelardo Hulleza, Joe Mendoza; Production Design: Jose Tamayo Cruz; Sound: Gregorio Ella

Plot Description: To support her paralytic father, Chato (Vilma Santos) works as a utility girl at Inday Theater for a burlesque star Virgie Nite (Rosemary Gil). Chato desperately wants to earn money to help her ailing and paralyzed father. When Virgie gets drunk on the night of her scheduled show, Chato pitches in for her, and she becomes an instant sensation. Enthused by the initial acceptance of the audience, she defies her father’s admonitions and presents herself to the manager, thus, becoming the new burlesque queen. The aberrant lifestyle of a burlesque performer leads Chato to a misguided existence. She becomes pregnant and is abandoned by the father of her baby. Desperate for cash, she agrees to appear in a lavish stage show. In front of a screaming male audience, Chato bumps and grinds in a tour de force performance, unaware of the danger to her pregnancy. – wikipilipinas

Film Achievements: Philippines’ Official Entry to the 1978 Berlin Film Festival (official citation not verified); Official Entry to the 1978 Festival del film Locarno (Switzerland); 1977 Metro Manila Film Festival: Festival Revenue Top Grosser; Best Actress – Vilma Santos; Best Picture – Ian Films; Best Actor – Rolly Quizon; Best Director – Celso Ad Castillo; Best Supporting Actress – Rosemarie Gil; Best Supporting Actor – Johnee Gamboa; Best Screenplay – Celso Ad Castillo, Mauro Gia Samonte; Best Production Design – Jose Tamayo Cruz; Editing – Abelardo Hulleza, Joe Mendoza; Best Musical Score – George Canseco; 1977 FAMAS: Best Actress Nomination – Vilma Santos; Best Supporting Actress Nomination – Rosemarie Gil; 1977 Gawad Urian: Best Picture Nomination – Ian Films; Best Actress Nomination – Vilma Santos; Best Director Nomination – Celso Ad Castillo; Best Supporting Actress Nomination – Rosemarie Gil; Best Supporting Actor Nomination – Rolly Quizon; Best Screenplay Nomination – Mauro Gia Samonte; Best Music Nomination – George Canseco; Best Sound Nomination – Gregorio Ella

Film Review: “…Celso Ad. Castillo’s Burlesk Queen (Burlesque Queen) is most famous for Vilma Santos’ noteworthy performance. She plays Chato, daughter of crippled Roque (Leopoldo Salcedo). She works as assistant to Virgie (Rosemarie Gil), current star of the burlesque stage (the film opens with Gil gyrating to the rapid beatings of drums, to the ecstasy of her numerous patrons). Resisting the lofty wishes of her father, Chato succumbs to the lure of the stage and the money it would bring her. It really is a grand performance as Santos was able to deliver the physical requirements of the role with her inate charismatic aura (a skill that earned the actress legions of fans and eventually elected to public office). Santos’ Chato is servile to the men around her (her father, Louie the theater manager (played by Joonee Gamboa in the film’s other equally terrific performance) and Jessie (Rolly Quizon), her boyfriend) but when she dances onstage, it doesn’t come off as merely sensual and titillating. She dances burlesque to make a statement (if there is such a thing), a statement important enough to die for…Burlesk Queen is much more than a gripping commercial melodrama. It is also a scathing commentary on the sarcastic sexual politics that has become the atmosphere of Philippine society: of hardworking women and the good-for-nothing men they serve (in other words, a patriarchal society gone awry). It is also a fervent reminder of the redemptive and equalizing power of art, which is the reason why it will always be a threat to those who hold power. Multi-faceted, committedly acted, and very well-directed, Burlesk Queen, I opine, is an unsung masterpiece…” – Francis “Oggs” Cruz, Lesson from The School Innattention (READ MORE)

“…Simple lamang ang plot. Isang tinedyer si Vilma Santos na alalay ng isang original burlesk queen, si Rosemarie Gil. May tatay na lumpo si Vilma, si Leopoldo Salcedo. Si Rosemarie naman ay may kabit na isang hustler, si Roldan Aquino. Nang iwanan ni Roldan si Rose, nagwala ang huli. Naging lasengga siya at tumangging magsayaw sa tanghalan. Mabibitin ang palatuntunan, kaya’t si Vilma na talaga namang may ambisyong magsayaw ang pumalit. Hit naman sa manonood si Vilma. Sa bahay, pilit kinukumbinsi ni Vilma si Pol na payagan na siyang maging full time dancer. Ayaw ni Pol, mas mahalaga sa kanya ang prinsipyo at delikadesa. Sapagkat wala namang ibang pagkakakitaan, si Vilma rin ang nasunod sa bandang huli. Nag-suicide si Pol nang hindi na niya masikmura ang pasiya ng anak. Si Rollie Quizon naman ang binatilyong masama ang tama kay Vilma. Nagtanan sila at nagsama. Pero hindi sanay sa hirap si Rollie. Sa pagpili sa pag-ibig o ginhawa sa buhay, ang huli ang pinahalagahan niya. Nagkataon namang buntis na si Vilma. Sa pag-iisa sa buhay, nagbalik siya sa pagsasayaw. Nagsayaw siya ng nagsayaw hanggang duguin siya sa tanghalan at malaglag ang kanyang dinadala…Kung matino ang kaanyuan ng pelikula, ay ganoon din ang masasabi sa nilalaman. Makatotohanan at masinop ang pagtalakay sa buhay ng isang abang mananayaw. Tinalakay rin dito kung paano siya tinatanggap ng lipunan at inuusig ng mga tagapangalaga raw ng moralidad. Maging ang empresaryo ng tanghalan na ginampanan ni Joonee Gamboa ay may konsiyensiya rin at nagtatanong sa atin kung anong panoorin ang dapat ibigay sa isang ordinaryong Pilipino na hindi kayang pumunta sa mga mamahaling kainan upang manood tulad halimbawa ng Merry Widow at Boys in the Band. Sila, aniya ng mga ‘dakilang alagad ng moralidad na nagdidikta at kumu-kontrol sa moralidad ng komunidad’, katapat ng munting kasiyahan ng isang Pilipinong hindi ‘kaya ang bayad sa mga ekslusibong palabas ng mayayaman.’ Samantala’y busy tayo sa paglilibang at sa kanila’y walang pakialam ngunit may handang pintas at pula sa mangahas lumabas sa batas ng moralidad ng lipunan…” – Jun Cruz Reyes, Miyembro, Manunuri ng Pelikulang Pilipino, Manila magazine December 1977 (READ MORE)

“…Furor is really an understatement. “Burlesk” swept the awards in that year’s MMFF, resulting in a controversy that led to the wholesale return of trophies. In spite of the scandal, “Burlesk” is still regarded by critics as the “quintessential” Filipino film. “Hinamon ni Brocka si Tinio ng suntukan (Lino Brocka dared Rolando Tinio to a fight),” Celso remembers. “Tinio, who was the head of the jury, heralded “Burlesk as the most beautiful Filipino film” past, present and future.” Vi’s turnaround: Adding fuel to the fire, “Burlesk” had stunned moviegoers because it unveiled a new “Vilma Santos” from ingénue to wanton woman. Vilma says of “Burlesk” – “It marked a transition in my career. Working with Celso Kid is a privilege. He’s a genius.” With good humor, Vilma recalls a “quarrel” on the set of “Pagputi ng Uwak, Pag-itim ng Tagak,” which she produced in 1978. “It took so long to finish. I lost money on that. But we’re still friends.” Burlesk and Pagputi brought a lot of honor to me…” – Bayani San Diego Jr. (READ MORE)

“…It was 1977 with an exceptional film, Burlesk Queen, that Castillo got his first critical recognition. Entered in that year’s Metro Manil Film Festival, it was adjudged the Best Picture, won forhim a Best Director Award as well as nine other artistic awards. It told a young girl in Manila in the 50’s who wanted to become a burlesque dancer. It showed a subdued Castillo. He seemed in this film, to have held back his passion for visual impact to give way to his new mastery of film grammar. His characters cried and whimpered, they did not scream and curse. They delievered dissertations on art, not imprecations of wrath, which had set the pitch of his previous films. The critics fought bitterly over Burlesk Queen. In that festival, he was contending with film makers who enjoyed a high reputation among the country’s most avid film critics. Upon winning the award, Castillo instantly became the favorite beating boy of the critics who did not appreciate Burlesk Queen. To prove to them his worth, Castillo did Pagputi ng Uwak, a 50’s epic set in his favorite Southern Tagalog locale. It was the most lavish of all his productions and had all the elements of a “great” Filipino film. He exploited the many religious and social rituals typical of the region. The film featured the two most critically acclaimed performers of the time, Bembol Roco, Jr. and Vilma Santos, with the cinematography of Romy Vitug complementing Castillo’s visual sense. And it touched on civil unrest to underline the film director’s social awareness. Pagputi ng Uwak was a visual fest, an artistic and socially responsive film aimed at the critics. It was also Castillo’s first commercial failure after a string of more than 20 minor and major box-office hits…In just a decade, Castillo, with all his audacity and dramatic excesses, has claimed his place as one of the most versatile and genuinely interesting filmmakers in the Philippines today…” – Rosauro de la Cruz (READ MORE)

Restoration – “…Two decades ago, it would have cost P15 million to restore an old movie; but with digital technology, the cost of saving our cinematic gems has become less prohibitive. Leo Katigbak, head of ABS-CBN Film Archives, had always wanted to upgrade the network’s library, home to such classics as Peque Gallaga’s “Oro, Plata, Mata” and Ishmael Bernal’s “Himala.” He recalled, “It always boiled down to a question of costs…One film that can never be restored, sadly, is Celso Ad. Castillo’s “Burlesk Queen,” starring Vilma Santos. “The only remaining copy we have of ‘Burlesk Queen’ is on video,” said Katigbak. We can’t restore material that’s on video. We have to go back to the negatives or master print…” – Bayani San Diego Jr. (READ MORE)

Devoid of the “pang-FAMAS” – “…The 1977 Urian Awards further established the reputation of the Manunuris as discoverers of new or ignored talents. Word spread around that “you don’t have to spend a cent for PR to win in the Urian” after Daria Ramirez (Sino’ng Kapiling, Sino’ng Kasiping) bested formidable co-nominee Vilma Santos (Burlesk Queen) for the best actress plum. The choice of Ramirez was not a popular one either, for her portrayal of a middle-class wife was devoid of the “pang-FAMAS” hysterics usually equated with good acting in Philippine movies…” – The Urian Anthology 1970-79 (READ MORE)

“…On Burlesk Queen. “Yes, I will never forget that seven-minute dance in the movie. I postponed the shoot of the scene five times. I was so afraid. I performed the dance in front of a real burlesk show audience. I remember the controversy about the Metro Manila Film Festival Awards and the squabble between Rolando Tinio and Lino Brocka. They wanted us to return the trophies. I didn’t return mine. I deserved it. I worked hard for that trophy…” – Boy Abunda, The Philippine Star, July 31, 2009 (READ MORE)

“…This veritable spiritual co-ownership ostensibly has enriched us all, Asians or Asean. It is no mark of a monarchical hauteur to say, for instance, that the films of Celso Ad Castillo, once dubbed as the Messiah of Filipino movies, are contemporaneous in their being a classic. If all these seem contradictory, Celso can easily point to his filmography to prove that there has always been, and will always be, fire in his filmmaker’s eyes. His “Burlesk Queen” and “Pagputi ng Uwak, Pag-itim ng Tagak,” for one, are now a classic, conscience-searing sociological film tractatus on structutal violence and institutional injustice that probed into the hearts of little people amidst a third world setting as encapsulated in the microscopic life of a poverty-stricken, young woman. It’s Rossellini, you would say? Think again…Pagputi ng Uwak, Pag-itim ng Tagak was sent to Sao Paolo, Brazil for the Latin American Film Festival and represented the Philippines at the Asean Film Conference in 1981…” – Celso Ad Castillo Presents web-site (READ MORE)

“…One of the first Filipino filmmakers to invade foreign film festivals abroad with such output as Burlesk Queen and Alamat ni Julian Makabayan (Berlin Film Festival and World Film Festival in Montreal) and Nympha (Venice Film Festival), among others, Celso The Kid returned to his hometown Siniloan, Laguna where he led a quiet life while working on his autobiography…His 1977 film, Burlesk Queen, won 10 out of the 11 awards of the 1977 Metro Manila Film Festival but the results were contested by Lino Brocka and defended by juror Rolando Tinio (now National Artists for Film and Theater), respectively. He reflected: “I wanted to vindicate myself as a filmmaker in this movie. The media referred to me as a reluctant artist and a filmmaker who has yet to arrive. Not only did the film run away with awards. It was also the top grosser. It broke the myth that quality films don’s make money in the box-office and commercial films don’t win awards…” – Pablo A. Tariman, The Philippine Star, 28 November 2012 (READ MORE)

“…Rosemarie Gil, like her daughter Cherie, was known for her rich socialite-villain roles, but surprisingly, she was introduced in a religious movie in 1958, in the title role of “Santa Rita de Casia (Patrona ng Imposible)”, opposite Lauro Delgado, who portrayed the saint’s wayward husband. This movie turned out to be a hit, but in the 60s, she married Eddie Mesa (Eddie Eigenmann, in real life), putting her stardom on hold, while her husband, known as the Philippines’ Elvis Presley, enjoyed a flourishing career as a singer and actor. The couple would eventually settle in the U.S., separate and then reconcile. Rosemarie went back to make movies for international release in the 1970s, starting with “Manda” (1970), “Night of the Cobra Woman” (1972), “Master Samurai” (1974), and the remake of “Siete Infantes de Lara” (1973). It was in 1977 that she made her presence felt in the 1977 critically-acclaimed “Burlesk Queen”, starring Vilma Santos. For her role as Virgie Nite, Rosemarie earned a Gawad Urian nomination the following year…” – Alex R. Castro, Views from Pangpang, Feb 21 2011 (READ MORE)

“…Celso Ad. Castillo, known as L’Enfant Terrible of Philippine Cinema, was best remembered with his fully independent spirit and out of the box ideas both on narrative and style. I always remember an Ad. Castillo film watching was always crazy in different ways. From the mock-tribal language of Snake Sisters (1984), the living house in Mga Lihim ng Kalapati (1987), to his melodramas charged with socio-political statements (Ang Alamat ni Julian Makabayan (1979), Burlesk Queen, (1977)). His ideas has always been crazy and there are some of those “first” experiences that was only given by his films: the first to see Fernando Poe Jr. die on a film (Asedillo), the first surrealist Filipino film I saw (Mga Lihim ng Kalapati(1987)), and also the first to see historical parallelism realized on both narrative and it’s image (Ang Alamat ni Julian Makabayan (1979)) which he probably used on remaking his own films (Nympha (1971, 2003), Ang Lihim ni Madonna (1979)). Being a lover and creator of Genre, he thinks that aiming for box office success was never a hindrance to make a good film. This he has proven on his body of work. I remember Burlesk Queen as one the film with the best performances ever, both from Vilma Santos and Joonie Gamboa. Especially Joonie Gamboa. Santos starred as Chato, once was an assistant of a dancer on a burlesque bar dreams also of being in the limelight even though her father won’t approve. Chato went from this dilemma to failed relationships until finally realizing her dream. Contains a lot of powerful scenes that would drove my emotions into a mixed state. Burlesk Queen is the proof of Celso’s vision: a success on the artistry and mass reception. Other Celso Ad. Castillo Films to prioritize: Ang Alamat ni Julian Makabayan, Payaso, Pagputi ng Uwak, Pag-itim ng Tagak, Asedillo…” – Epoy Deyto, Kawts Kamote, September 12, 2013 (READ MORE)

“…As for his masterpiece Burlesk Queen (1977)–here’s an excerpt of what I wrote about a moment in the film (Chato’s deflowering), for Chris Fujiwara’s The Little Black Book of Movies: “Celso uses Jessie’s smooth back as both veil and metaphor for Chato’s nudity, the clothes dropping from overhead hangers as metaphor for her failing inhibitions; what makes the scene erotic and nakedly emotional is Chato’s face, glimpsed over Jessie’s left shoulder as terror (the widened eyes), greed (the remote expression, as if she were a starving man wolfing down a steak), pain (the startled look of one who has been kicked in the crotch), guilt (the tears) and finally pleasure (the bit lower lip) flit across and mingle in her eyes.” Ad Castillo was not a genius; he was more interesting than that. His films were often incoherent, often inconsistent, sometimes because he didn’t have the money, sometimes because he told stories that way–apparently narrative was secondary to him, an excuse to flex his prodigious filmmaking muscles. Of his greatest works–which include but are not limited to Ang Alamat ni Julian Makabayan; Pagputi ng Uwak, Pagitim ng Tagak; and Burlesk Queen–his imagery burned incandescent, his filmmaking technique was second to none. If Mike De Leon is Philippine Cinema’s mad intellectual, Lino Brocka its fiery social realist, Ishmael Bernal its skeptic-satirist, Mario O’Hara its nightmare scenarist, Celso was its poet laureate–his images were Filipino lyricism incarnate. His passing is an unimaginable loss…” – Noel Vera, Critique After Dark, 06 December 2012 (READ MORE)

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‘Burlesk Queen’ Onto The Height of Pathos


The title, Burlesk Queen, with its Tagalized spelling of “burlesque,” immediately striking up an image of novelty and distinction all its own, and inspired by the actual period of Philippine entertainment in the 50s and 60s, is rooted in concrete historical perspective contributing immensely to its achievement of exemplary unity in film art.

To film buffs like Ricky Lee, who at the time was only just beginning to mull the idea of turning scriptwriter, it became necessary to check the shooting script of Burlesk Queen, ostensibly for the festival committee, but in reality, I didn’t bothered to find out. He didn’t get to realize that with Castillo, what script is written on the typewriter is barely half of the work one gets to finally see on film; the other half is written on the spot as an imperative of the limitations in local filmmaking, like creativity on the set, lack of logistics for production design or camera requirements, etc. That—on the spot scriptwriting—happens to be my cup of tea, which figures perfectly with Castillo’s creative style, method of work, whatever you may want to call it. Lee, definitely, won’t get to first base with Castillo in such a methodology.  At any rate, the best proof of the pudding is the tasting, never mind who the baker is.

Burlesk Queen opens with Virgie Knight (Rosemarie Gil) performing onstage. Traditionally movies begin by establishing the main character. Does Virgie’s opening dance defy the tradition? Not at all. Virgie may be taking time a bit too much in her dance so that she impresses the spectator as the main character in the story, but what is transpiring onstage is not an actress delineating a role but rather an image, an idea, of which the dancer is a mere representation. And what is that image, that idea?

Burlesque.  And under the principle of montage, when two representations are juxtaposed to each other, i.e., joined together, the juxtaposition produces a qualitatively different theme. By making the idea, image of burlesque as its opening number, Burlesk Queen upholds revered canons for artistic expression. On aesthetics in general, the film conforms perfectly with the Aristotlean test for art: “at once, brilliant, beautiful and whole.” Burlesque is a thematically-hewn visual delight, appearing as sudden as the opening shot.  By literary standard, Burlesk Queen conforms to the dictum of story development proceeding from the development of the main character. The actual start of the story is Chato’s (Vilma Santos’) affectation by the main theme, the burlesque dance.  Adherents of montage will amaze at the theme of burlesque, from scene one onward, permeating every scene and every detail of these scenes with astonishing, exquisite, if tedious, consistency.

Note this story flow. After Virgie’s performance, she and Chato take snack at an eatery, Chato expressing her desire to dance burlesque like Virgie so as to earn a big sum by which to buy her crippled father a wheelchair. Coming home, Chato excitedly relates to her father, Mang Roque (Leopoldo Salcedo), how nice Virgie’s dancing is—burlesque. In relating thus, Chato does hip bumps and gyrations— burlesque. Mang Roque expresses aversion to Chato’s job as attendant to—burlesque. All the way to Mang Roque’s distaste for the food pasalubong Chato brings him which he says he cannot stomach for being a proceed of . . . burlesque.

Even up to this point only, it becomes clear that the film has had a firm grasp of the tenets of montage, has grappled with, and has overcome, the problem of building compositional structure for achieving organic unity. But the extent of such unity must go all the way to the climax where the desired pathos must be experienced, so that the testing of the validity of this observation must be continued all the way to the finale.

What comes next? Virgie goes home to her own third-rate flat, swinging to a boogie tune from a transistor radio slung by a hand on her shoulder. The gait, the sway, the music, including the erratic electric light that goes on and off — all of these effect a retention of the aura of the burlesque theater. The ensuing quarrel between her and lover Ander (Roldan Aquino) centers on Virgie’s failure to get further advance payment for her dancing, what else but burlesque? For failing to give Ander the money he needs, Virgie is deserted by him then and there, and as he steps out of the house (off-frame), banging the door shut, the impact causes the light to turn off for good—certainly the theatrical way of ending an episode of a show as well as a transition to the next episode.

And what transpires next? In a flat-like Virgie’s, the morning after, a rough-edged, if attractive, cheaply-sexy-looking woman who Ander, in his lines, reveals as a nightclub hostess (Dexter Doria) is urging him to get dressed pronto (he is naked in bed, his front covered only with a pillow—isn’t this burlesque!) and accompany her to the dressmaker to get an outfit she had ordered. In one respect, aside from being exposed (his nakedness does this) now as a gigolo victimizing women in the flesh trade, Ander serves as the unifying thread with the immediately preceding scene with Virgie. In another respect, the club hostess’ urging Ander to accompany her to the dressmaker is a crafty method for making the aberrant Ander to stay on-line, i.e., stay within the theme. For at that very moment, who should be figuring in the dressmaker’s shop but, yes, Virgie, trying on a new costume for her stage act, again yes, burlesque.

This dress shop sequence is a particularly interesting specimen for study. What are its elements? Virgie trying on her new costume. Chato snickering at the window with a friend as she exchanges naughty glances with Jessie (Rolly Quizon, presented here for the first time), who is playing pool with barkada across the street. The arrival of Ander and the club hostess, who engages Virgie in a verbal tussle over burlesque. Lowly folks crowding in the surroundings, as audience in a theater. While a pair of musician beggars endlessly play a violin and percussion instrument, rendering music that completes the theater atmosphere.

Truly, indeed, as montage requires, a film to be art must conform to the law governing organic unity in natural phenomena. Lenin, the great leader of the Russian proletarian revolution under whose influence Eisenstein developed the montage theory, puts it this way: “…the particular does not exist outside that relationship which leads to the general. The general exists only in the particular, through the particular.”

Hence in Burlesk Queen, scene after scene, and detail after detail to their minutest proportions within each scene, nothing exists that is not within the central theme of burlesque.  In this dress shop sequence, Virgie makes like unaffected by Ander’s having completely abandoned her for the club hostess, but in the dressing room where she repairs to after the verbal clash, she gives vent to all her sorrow from having lost Ander forever. At precisely this point, Chato is exchanging love gazes with Jessie. Here we have a pretty lucid illustration of a rule in dramaturgy that has been a tradition of Greek tragedies whereby qualitative leaps in thematic development are always in the opposite. Chato’s joy at a nascent love affair with Jessie is contraposed to Virgie’s grief brought about by the end of her relationship with Ander. Yet though such qualitative leaps go separate ways, they stay confined within a seeming thematic parallel by which both leaps contribute to the building of a compositional structure necessary to maintain the organic unity begun earlier on at the opening. Virgie drops into depression and is so drunk during one burlesque presentation in the theater that she is not able to answer the call when her number comes. Now, who should come onstage to take Virgie’s place just so to placate a maddened crowd but a young dancer—Chato!

Love and hate, joy and sorrow, emotions going their separate ways, but perfectly maintained within the never-for-a-moment-missed parameters of the central theme of burlesque. More than bare feelings, the emotions actually represent images building up for another qualitative leap in the drama by which to finally attain, along strict criteria of Greek tragedies, the ultimate height of pathos. – Mao Gia Samonte Manila Times February 12, 2009