Special Film: Kampus? (1978)

“…But the biggest fear of Borlaza was when Agrix Films’ Kampus? (1978) was booked one week after the opening of VS Films’ Pagputi ng Uwak, Pagitim ng Tagak. The Celso Ad. Castillo film was an artistic triumph, and Borlza felt following it up with another Vilma-Bembol starrer would put them at a great disadvantage. The Vilma-Bembol fans might still be raving over Pagputi… instead of discussing Kamput? As it turned out, people let Pagputi…pass and waited for Kampus? judging from the comparative gate receiots of the two movies…Sabi ni Mama Santos, ako daw ang “pumatay” sa kanilang Pagputi…eto ang parusa ko, bigyan ko daw sila ng isang Kampus? so I’m making for them Coed. You see, when I was working on Kampus? at UP Los Banos, I realized their problems and lifestyle can be a source of even 10 movie materials. At kapag ang student force pala ang nag-patronize sa Tagalog movie, ang laki ng audience!” Borlaza revealed…I’m very meticulous about is: the audience were to identify itself with my main character, will it be happy with the poetic justice I execute? Will they find it correct and realistic? In Kampus? for instance, students who were pleased with the movie told me they liked the ending very much. They agreed with it. Vilma was bedded first by Mat Ranillo III, but ended up with Bembol who was the right choice after all. They say in real life, the man you walk down the aisle with is not necessarily the first man you had sex with. Also they say the dialouges were very in – like the way actual students would speak them. Siguro, once they sit in the theater, they are not bothered by such questions as ‘Why” or “how come?” Is the star value the main thing in selling movies? “In the case of Kampus?, yes, because Vilma Santos was my main star and she’s the current box office queen …” – Manny B. Fernandez, Expressweek, November 9, 1978 (READ MORE)

Source: gobitz69

FAIR USE NOTICE (NOT FOR COMMERCIAL USE): This site contains copyrighted materials the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. We are making such material available in our efforts to preserve the film legacies of actress, Vilma Santos, and to make her career information available to future generations. We believe this is NOT an infringement of any such copyrighted materials as in accordance to the the fair dealing clauses of both the Canadian and U.S. Copyright legislation, both of which allows users to engage in certain activities relating to research, private study, criticism, review, or news reporting. We are making an exerted effort to mention the source of the material, along with the name of the author, performer, maker, or broadcaster for the dealing to be fair, again in accordance with the allowable clauses. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

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FILM REVIEW: MASARAP MASAKIT ANG UMIBIG

Plot Description: A wealthy couple’s sacrificing adopted son, Alonso (Christopher de Leon) and wayward biological son, Alvaro (Mat Ranillo III) vie for the love of the same woman, Estella (Vilma Santos).

Film Reviews: “…Walang ipinagkaiba ang pelikula sa ibang mga sineng tinalakay ang mga suliranin ng pag-ibig at pamilya. Makikitang pinagtuunan ng pansin ni direktor Elwood Perez ang disenyo ng pelikula ngunit hindi naging epektibo ang paggamit nito upang maiusad ang kuwento. Kahit sa pagganap ng mga pangunahing tauhan, animo sila’y nasa entablado. Nanlilisik ang mga mata, walang katapusang pagsisigawan, pagtutulakan at pagbubugbugan. Sa pelikulang ito, unang ipinamalas ang senswalidad ni Vilma Santos. Maraming eksenang sekswal ang aktres at maaari talaga siyang makipagsabayan sa mga tulad nina Alma Moreno at Trixia Gomez. Karamihan ng mga sitwasyong ibinigay sa kanyang karakter ay hindi kapani-paniwala. Nariyang gawin siyang modelo, sa ilang piling tagpo ipinakita din ang pagiging estudyante ni Estella ngunit hindi naman tinahak ang mga ito sa kabuuan ng pelikula. Hindi rin maikakaila ang husay ni Christopher de Leon bilang aktor ngunit sa pelikulang ito ay nasayang lamang ang kanyang pagganap. Hindi nabigyan ng tamang direksyon ang aktor kung kaya’t lumabas na sabog ang kanyang karakterisasyon. Si Mat Ranillo III naman ay tila hindi na natutong umarte. Kadalasa’y pinaghuhubad siya ng direktor sa mga eksena upang mabigyang pansin. Masyadong mahaba ang pelikula dahil na rin siguro sa panghihinayang ni direk Elwood na masayang ang magagandang eksenang kanyang nakunan ngunit hindi naman nakaapekto ang mga ito sa takbo ng istorya. Kadalasa’y nakababad lamang ang kamera at nakatanghod sa susunod na gagawin ng mga artista. Hindi ito nakatulong upang mapabilis ang takbo ng pelikula, nakakainip panoorin ang ganitong mga eksena. Ang Masarap, Masakit Ang Umibig ay basurang nababalot sa kinang ng makintab na sinematograpiya, disenyo at musika na nagbabalatkayong masining na pelikula.” Jojo Devera, Sari-saring Sineng Pinoy (READ MORE)

“…Her metamorphosis began in late 1976 when she agreed to be kissed by Rudy Fernandez in Makahiya at Talahib. It was a “feeler” of sort and when the public clacked its tongue in obvious approval, Vilma shelved her lollipops-and-roses image and proved that she, too, could be a woman – a wise move indeed because at that time her career was on a downswing and her movies were not making money. Then she did Mga Rosas sa Putikan for her own VS Films where she played a country girl forced into prostitution in the big city. The movie did fairly well at the tills. Good sign. And came her romance with Romeo Vasquez, boosting both their stocks at the box office (thier two starrers, Nag-aapoy na Damdamin and Pulot-Gata where Vilma did her own wet style, were big moneymakers). The tandem, although it did help Vilma, actually helped Vasquez more in re-establishing himself at the box office (without Vilma, his movies with other leading ladies hardly create any ripple). In Susan Kelly, Edad 20, Vilma played a notorious-woman role that required her to wear skimpy bikini briefs in some scenes, following it up with two giant sizzlers (Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon and Masarap, Masakit ang Umibig) that catapulted her as the newest Bold Queen. Then came Burlesk Queen…” – Ricardo F. Lo, Expressweek Magazine January 19, 1978 (READ MORE)

“…Elwood Perez and Vilma Santos colloborated in seven films (Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos 1988, Lipad Darna Lipad 1973, Magkaribal 1979, Masarap Masakit ang Umibig 1977, Nakawin Natin ang Bawat Sandali 1978, Pakawalan Mo Ako 1981, Pinay American Style 1979). The first one was the trilogy that he co-directed with two other director, Borlaza and Gosiengfiao (these three are the most underrated and under appreciated directors in the Philippines), the remake of Mars Ravelo comic super hero, Darna in Lipad Darna Lipad. The film was a record-breaking hit Box-office Film. They follow this up with a more mature projects as Vilma started to switched her image from sweet to a mature versatile actress, pairing her with Christopher DeLeon in five films starting with Masarap Masakit Ang Umibig in 1977. The Perez-Santos-DeLeon team produced seven blockbuster hits that gave Vilma two FAMAS best actress awards that secured her elevation to FAMAS highest honour, the FAMAS Hall of Fame award. She won in 1979 for Pakawalan Mo Ako and 1988 for Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos…” – RV (READ MORE)

Filmography: Kampus (1978)

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Basic Information: Directed: Emmanuel H. Borlaza; Story, screenplay: Tom Adrales, Allan Jayme Rabaya; Cast: Vilma Santos, Bembol Roco, Mat Ranillo III, Allan Valenzuela, Freddie Yance, Liza Lorena, Anita Linda, Lorli Villanueva, Ann Villegas, Angie magbanua, Rosemarie De Vera, Lito Lapid, Leo Pilapil; Original Music: Tito Sotto; Cinematography: Totoy Jacinto; Production Design: George Vail Kabristante

Plot Description: In the film “Kampus?” (1978), Suzette (Vilma Santos) thinks she’s liberated woman who doesn’t believe in marriage matrimony while his boyfriend, Norman keeps on proposing the sacredness of marriage vow. These are two conflicting beliefs of two students undoubtedly in love with each other. Their relationship was put to a test when Suzette met Manny (Matt) who happens to be in accordance with what she thinks she believes in. A campus experiment for Suzette and she was the first to be affected by it. Will she swallow that so called principle and be merry with the one she truly loves? – Kabayan Central (READ MORE)

A cinematic view of campus life dealing with sexual permissiveness among teeners, dormitory life, fraternity affiliations and initiations, teenage crushes, among others. Vilma Santos is a coed torn between the man she really loves (Bemvol Roco) and the man she surrenders her virginity to (Mat Ranillo III), Liza Lorena is the teacher tormented by a student who has a terrible crush on her (Allan Valenzuela). An Emmanuel Borlaza film. – Century Video Inc.

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Review: “…But the biggest fear of Borlaza was when Agrix Films’ Kampus? was booked one week after the opening of VS Films’ Pagputi ng Uwak, Pagitim ng Tagak. The Celso Ad. Castillo film was an artistic triumph, and Borlza felt following it up with another Vilma-Bembol starrer would put them at a great disadvantage. The Vilma-Bembol fans might still be raving over Pagputi… instead of discussing Kamput? As it turned out, people let Pagputi…pass and waited for Kampus? judging from the comparative gate receiots of the two movies…Sabi ni Mama Santos, ako daw ang “pumatay” sa kanilang Pagputi…eto ang parusa ko, bigyan ko daw sila ng isang Kampus? so I’m making for them Coed. You see, when I was working on Kampus? at UP Los Banos, I realized their problems and lifestyle can be a source of even 10 movie materials. At kapag ang student force pala ang nag-patronize sa Tagalog movie, ang laki ng audience!” Borlaza revealed…I’m very meticulous about is: the audience were to identify itself with my main character, will it be happy with the poetic justice I execute? Will they find it correct and realistic? In Kampus? for instance, students who were pleased with the movie told me they liked the ending very much. They agreed with it. Vilma was bedded first by Mat Ranillo III, but ended up with Bembol who was the right choice after all. They say in real life, the man you walk down the aisle with is not necessarily the first man you had sex with. Also they say the dialouges were very in – like the way actual students would speak them. Siguro, once they sit in the theater, they are not bothered by such questions as ‘Why” or “how come?” Is the star value the main thing in selling movies? “In the case of Kampus?, yes, because Vilma Santos was my main star and she’s the current box office queen …” – Manny B. Fernandez, Expressweek, November 9, 1978 (READ MORE)

“…Fate would have it that in the space of three days I watched Vilma Santos as June (in Kampus, 1978), the firm believer of ‘free love’ caught between the attentions of two men, and Angel Locsin as the fierce Ces, setting the terms of an affair with a man she decidedly resists. Four decades apart, these representations of strong, independent women caught within obstacles premised on love remain appealing to viewers. The conflicts faced by June and Ces are hinged on unconventional ideas about the conduct of heterosexual relationships. These women characters unequivocally distance themselves from the bind of traditional relationships and the expectations that burden it; June with sophisticated musing and Ces with stoic distance…While Vilma Santos’s June ponders her preference for ‘free love’ intelligently, weighs her dilemmas with pensive introspection, faces her hurdles with sarcasm and humour; Angel Locsin’s Ces is denied this chance, wallows instead in denial which became infuriatingly tiresome. This is not to blame Locsin’s abilities as an actor (adept at she is in portraying conflicted characters, torn in situations not of their making) but on the film’s failure to fully flesh out its characters. The film failed to grasp a deeper vein of feeling…” – Tessa Maria Guazon (READ MORE)

Free Love – “…Fate would have it that in the space of three days I watched Vilma Santos as June (in Kampus, 1978), the firm believer of ‘free love’ caught between the attentions of two men, and Angel Locsin as the fierce Ces, setting the terms of an affair with a man she decidedly resists. Four decades apart, these representations of strong, independent women caught within obstacles premised on love remain appealing to viewers. The conflicts faced by June and Ces are hinged on unconventional ideas about the conduct of heterosexual relationships. These women characters unequivocally distance themselves from the bind of traditional relationships and the expectations that burden it; June with sophisticated musing and Ces with stoic distance…While Vilma Santos’s June ponders her preference for ‘free love’ intelligently, weighs her dilemmas with pensive introspection, faces her hurdles with sarcasm and humour; Angel Locsin’s Ces is denied this chance, wallows instead in denial which became infuriatingly tiresome. This is not to blame Locsin’s abilities as an actor (adept at she is in portraying conflicted characters, torn in situations not of their making) but on the film’s failure to fully flesh out its characters. The film failed to grasp a deeper vein of feeling. Thus, when we find Ces and Macky in strained conversations grappling with their predicaments as individuals and lovers, why do they seem unconvincing, their loneliness and dilemmas so affected?” – Deborah Jermyn, 2011, posted by YCC (READ MORE)

Filmography: Masarap, Masakit ang Umibig (1977)

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Basic Information: Directed: Elwood Perez; Story: Orlando Nadres; Screenplay: Elwood Perez, Orlando Nadres; Cast: Vilma Santos, Christopher De Leon, Mat Ranillo III, Amado Cortez, Lilibeth Vera-Perez, Anita Linda, Ma-An Hontiveros, Lillian Laing, Sandy Garcia, Cloyd Robinson, Laila Dee; Executive producer: Marichu Vera Perez; Original Music: Lutgardo Labad; Cinematography: Gener Buenaseda; Film Editing: Jose Tarnate; Production Design: Bobby Bautista

Plot Description: A wealthy couple’s sacrificing adopted son, Alonso (Christopher de Leon) and wayward biological son, Alvaro (Mat Ranillo III) vie for the love of the same woman, Estella (Vilma Santos).

Film Achievement: Official Selection – 1981 ASEAN Film Festival, Sydney Austarlia; 1978 Asia-Pacific Film Festival, Taipei Taiwan; 1978 FAMAS Best Supporting Actor – Mat Ranillo III; 1978 FAMAS Nomination Best Actor – Christopher De Leon

“…Elwood Perez and Vilma Santos colloborated in seven films. The first one was the trilogy that he co-directed with two other director, Borlaza and Gosiengfiao (these three are the most underrated and under appreciated directors in the Philippines), the remake of Mars Ravelo comic super hero, Darna in Lipad Darna Lipad. The film was a record-breaking hit Box-office Film. They follow this up with a more mature projects as Vilma started to switched her image from sweet to a mature versatile actress, pairing her with Christopher DeLeon in five films starting with Masarap Masakit Ang Umibig in 1977. The Perez-Santos-DeLeon team produced seven blockbuster hits that gave Vilma two FAMAS best actress awards that secured her elevation to FAMAS highest honour, the FAMAS Hall of Fame award. She won in 1979 for Pakawalan Mo Ako and 1988 for Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos…Total Number of Films with Vilma Santos: 7 (Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos 1988, Lipad Darna Lipad 1973, Magkaribal 1979, Masarap Masakit ang Umibig 1977, Nakawin Natin ang Bawat Sandali 1978, Pakawalan Mo Ako 1981, Pinay American Style 1979)…” – RV (READ MORE)

Film Reviews: “…Walang ipinagkaiba ang pelikula sa ibang mga sineng tinalakay ang mga suliranin ng pag-ibig at pamilya. Makikitang pinagtuunan ng pansin ni direktor Elwood Perez ang disenyo ng pelikula ngunit hindi naging epektibo ang paggamit nito upang maiusad ang kuwento. Kahit sa pagganap ng mga pangunahing tauhan, animo sila’y nasa entablado. Nanlilisik ang mga mata, walang katapusang pagsisigawan, pagtutulakan at pagbubugbugan. Sa pelikulang ito, unang ipinamalas ang senswalidad ni Vilma Santos. Maraming eksenang sekswal ang aktres at maaari talaga siyang makipagsabayan sa mga tulad nina Alma Moreno at Trixia Gomez. Karamihan ng mga sitwasyong ibinigay sa kanyang karakter ay hindi kapani-paniwala. Nariyang gawin siyang modelo, sa ilang piling tagpo ipinakita din ang pagiging estudyante ni Estella ngunit hindi naman tinahak ang mga ito sa kabuuan ng pelikula. Hindi rin maikakaila ang husay ni Christopher de Leon bilang aktor ngunit sa pelikulang ito ay nasayang lamang ang kanyang pagganap. Hindi nabigyan ng tamang direksyon ang aktor kung kaya’t lumabas na sabog ang kanyang karakterisasyon. Si Mat Ranillo III naman ay tila hindi na natutong umarte. Kadalasa’y pinaghuhubad siya ng direktor sa mga eksena upang mabigyang pansin. Masyadong mahaba ang pelikula dahil na rin siguro sa panghihinayang ni direk Elwood na masayang ang magagandang eksenang kanyang nakunan ngunit hindi naman nakaapekto ang mga ito sa takbo ng istorya. Kadalasa’y nakababad lamang ang kamera at nakatanghod sa susunod na gagawin ng mga artista. Hindi ito nakatulong upang mapabilis ang takbo ng pelikula, nakakainip panoorin ang ganitong mga eksena. Ang Masarap, Masakit Ang Umibig ay basurang nababalot sa kinang ng makintab na sinematograpiya, disenyo at musika na nagbabalatkayong masining na pelikula.” Jojo Devera, Sari-saring Sineng Pinoy (READ MORE)

“…Her metamorphosis began in late 1976 when she agreed to be kissed by Rudy Fernandez in Makahiya at Talahib. It was a “feeler” of sort and when the public clacked its tongue in obvious approval, Vilma shelved her lollipops-and-roses image and proved that she, too, could be a woman – a wise move indeed because at that time her career was on a downswing and her movies were not making money. Then she did Mga Rosas sa Putikan for her own VS Films where she played a country girl forced into prostitution in the big city. The movie did fairly well at the tills. Good sign. And came her romance with Romeo Vasquez, boosting both their stocks at the box office (thier two starrers, Nag-aapoy na Damdamin and Pulot-Gata where Vilma did her own wet style, were big moneymakers). The tandem, although it did help Vilma, actually helped Vasquez more in re-establishing himself at the box office (without Vilma, his movies with other leading ladies hardly create any ripple). In Susan Kelly, Edad 20, Vilma played a notorious-woman role that required her to wear skimpy bikini briefs in some scenes, following it up with two giant sizzlers (Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon and Masarap, Masakit ang Umibig) that catapulted her as the newest Bold Queen. Then came Burlesk Queen…” – Ricardo F. Lo, Expressweek Magazine January 19, 1978 (READ MORE)

“…Elwood Perez and Vilma Santos colloborated in seven films (Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos 1988, Lipad Darna Lipad 1973, Magkaribal 1979, Masarap Masakit ang Umibig 1977, Nakawin Natin ang Bawat Sandali 1978, Pakawalan Mo Ako 1981, Pinay American Style 1979). The first one was the trilogy that he co-directed with two other director, Borlaza and Gosiengfiao (these three are the most underrated and under appreciated directors in the Philippines), the remake of Mars Ravelo comic super hero, Darna in Lipad Darna Lipad. The film was a record-breaking hit Box-office Film. They follow this up with a more mature projects as Vilma started to switched her image from sweet to a mature versatile actress, pairing her with Christopher DeLeon in five films starting with Masarap Masakit Ang Umibig in 1977. The Perez-Santos-DeLeon team produced seven blockbuster hits that gave Vilma two FAMAS best actress awards that secured her elevation to FAMAS highest honour, the FAMAS Hall of Fame award. She won in 1979 for Pakawalan Mo Ako and 1988 for Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos…” – RV (READ MORE)

Filmography: Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon (1977)

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Basic Information: Direction, Screenplay and Original Story: Ishmael Bernal; Cast: Romeo Vasquez, Vilma Santos, Mat Ranillo III, Ana Gonzales, Anita Linda, Fred Montilla, Mary Walter, Laila Dee, Roldan Rodrigo, Ann Villegas, Ernie Zarate, Catherine Santos, Val Mallari, Oscar Miranda, Ursula Carlos, Rene Magno, SOS Daredevils, Danie Ramirez, Danny Franco and Rheez Chua’s Models; Art Director: Bobby Bautista; Assistant Art Directors: Emiliano Gonzales, Virgilio Sanchez, and Bert Isleta; Electricians and Gripmen: Corpuz, Romeo Dueñas, Narsiso David, Mariano Guzman, Irinio Flores; Unit Driver: Jose Maigapo; Color Processed: LVN Laboratory; Director of Cinematography: Nonong Rasca; Assistant Cameraman: Felizardo Anastacio; Sound: Luis Reyes; Field Soundman: Jose Fortuno; Boomman: Alberto Dueñas; SFX Technician: Jun Martinez; Film Editor: Nonoy Santillian; Senior Editor: Ruben Pantua; Assistant Editors: Rico Salas, Ariel Quicho, Jun Calaguan; Music: The Vanishing Tribe; Theme Songs: “Puso’y Alinlangan” performed by Vilma Santos, “Torn Between Two Lovers” performed by Gracie Rivera, Dyna Records; Guest Choroeographer: Peter Estocado; Make-up Artists: Dading Ravela and Virgie F. Capulong; Legman: Rodolfo Basco; Publicities: Teresa Santos Blas, Beth Castillo; Stills: Ben Nollora and Lito Morales; Layout Artist: Hannibal Cambel; Title Designer: Marvin B. Panganiban; Production Manager and Assistant Director: Dante Javier; Production Staff: Nelson Sia, Ruben Fernandez, Gloria B. Agustin; Administrative and Sales: Jon Santos Blas, Estrella T. Mendoza, Lea Santos, Fidelio Santos, Julie S. Enriquez; Executive Production: T. Buhain Santos; Executive Producer: Emilia Santos Blas; Produced by Lea Production; 15th Years Anniversary Production; Film Poster Archived: Video48

Plot Description: Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon is a 1977 drama film directed by Ishmael Bernal. The film analyzes adultery in a mature way and presents reasons why many modern marriages in bourgeois families slowly dissipate into alienation and lead to adultery. The movie’s main plot involves a fashion model (Vilma Santos) who is torn between two men: her young boyfriend, who is a self-centered, airheaded fashion model (Mat Ranillo III), and an older married man (Romeo Vasquez), who is estranged from his domineering wife (Anna Gonzales). – Wikipilipinas

Film Achievement: 1977 Gawad Urian: Best Director – Ishmael Bernal; Best Editing Nomination – Nonoy Santillan; Best Picture Nomination; Best Production Design Nomination – Bobby Bautista; Best Screenplay Nomination – Ishmael Bernal; Best Sound Nomination – Luis Reyes; Best Supporting Actor Nomination – Mat Ranillo III

Film Review: “…Bernal, testing the tensions of triangular love (for geometry books, one of his characters wittily says) for some time now, plunges deeper into character analysis and metaphorizing… In Lumayo, Lumapit ang Umaga, the triangle was unevenly explored: the first love was sketchily drawn. Dalawang Pugad, Isang become a choice for a more stable relationship. Walang Katapusang Tag-araw was a strange reverse of characters for two women and an unusual development of love into hatred and hatred into love, where therefore the triangle was essentially illusions. Ikaw ay Akin finally sets an interlocked triangle on its bases and looks at it (from all 3 angles) squarely in the face…” – Petronila CletoPelikula, Atbp (READ MORE)

“…Her metamorphosis began in late 1976 when she agreed to be kissed by Rudy Fernandez in Makahiya at Talahib. It was a “feeler” of sort and when the public clacked its tongue in obvious approval, Vilma shelved her lollipops-and-roses image and proved that she, too, could be a woman – a wise move indeed because at that time her career was on a downswing and her movies were not making money. Then she did Mga Rosas sa Putikan for her own VS Films where she played a country girl forced into prostitution in the big city. The movie did fairly well at the tills. Good sign. And came her romance with Romeo Vasquez, boosting both their stocks at the box office (thier two starrers, Nag-aapoy na Damdamin and Pulot-Gata where Vilma did her own wet style, were big moneymakers). The tandem, although it did help Vilma, actually helped Vasquez more in re-establishing himself at the box office (without Vilma, his movies with other leading ladies hardly create any ripple). In Susan Kelly, Edad 20, Vilma played a notorious-woman role that required her to wear skimpy bikini briefs in some scenes, following it up with two giant sizzlers (Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon and Masarap, Masakit ang Umibig) that catapulted her as the newest Bold Queen. Then came Burlesk Queen…” – Ricardo F. Lo, Expressweek Magazine January 19, 1978 (READ MORE)

“Sometime in the mid 70s, matinee idol Romeo Vasquez returned to the movie scene after a long absence, his movie career in limbo after his failed marriage with popular actress Amalia Fuentes. His teamup with Vilma Santos somehow rekindled and revived his career. Their first movie together, Nag-aapoy na Damdamin in 1976 turned out to be a big hit. Despite their age gap, reel and real life sweetheart, Romeo, 34 and Vilma, 23, soon became the hottest love team, doing one hit movies after another…” – Video 48 (READ MORE)

“…Romeo Vasquez is an oddity in Vilma’s life. Hindi akalain ng lahat na ang isang notorious playboy and balikbayan actor would capture the heart of the then elusive Ate Vi. Nagkaroon sila ng affair which lasted for more than a year. Kilala si Bobby sa pagiging bohemyo kaya naman walang kakilala si Ate Vi na bumoto sa aktor. Ate Vi was love struck at talagang na head-over heels in love. Nagsimula ang kanilang affair sa set ng kanilang pelikulang “Nag-aapoy na Damdamin”. True to this title, nagliyab silang dalawa at tunay ngang nag-apoy ang kanilang damdamin. May plano pa nga sila ni Bobby na magpakasal sa Europe. Talagang Ate Vi was ready to give up her life as an actress and would settle with the actor abroad. And with herb relationship with Bobby, nag-surface ang bagong Vilma Santos.Ate Vi realized that she cann’t sacrifice everything for love. Nagising siya sa katotohanan at nagkamali kung kaya nagdesisyon siyang kumalas sa bohemyong aktor…” – Willie Fernandez (READ MORE)

“…But it was with handsome actor Romeo Vasquez that Vilma Santos had her most controversial relationship. Romeo was the former husband of Philippine movie queen Amalia Fuentes. He and Vilma first paired in the movie Nag-aapoy na Damdamin (1976). It was also during this year that they became a couple. They made several movies together, all of which did well at the box-office. Vi and Bobby (Romeo’s nickname) became the most-talked about reel and real love team at the time. The relationship was always on the pages of showbiz magazines and tabloid entertainment section pages because of the intrigues and the personalities who got involved with them…” – Rommel R. Llanes (READ MORE)

The first nine months fo 1977 saw the release of bad local movies that are unbelievable for their sheer contempt of the moviegoer and even more unbelievable for their increasing popularity. The few decent ones include Robert Arevalo’s Hubad na Bayani, Eddie Romero’s Sinong Kapiling, Sinong Kasiping, Manuel Cinco’s Hostage…Hanapin si Batuigas, Briccio Santos’ Manikang Papel and Luis Enriquez Malayo Man Malapit Din. These are films that respect their audiences and treat them not just paying patrons but also as thinking individuals. For the past two weeks, however, a film that say something and says it right have been packing moviehouses in competition with the James Bond movie, other “adults” local picture and the Dolphy-Nida comedy. This is a cheerful occassion for the local movie industry because rarely does a director hit two birds with one stone; that is Dalawang Pugad…Isang Ibon, a love-triangle drama that was a pre-sold on account of the publicity generated by the oprivate lives of its two principal stars. Its director and scriptwriter, Ishmael Bernal, however, deserves the greater part of the credit for the picture’s commercial and artistic success. For Beranal has done what was dismissed before as an impossibility – a good Vilma Santos-Romeo Vasquez movie. Dalawang Pugad is not just a good movie, it is a superior movie and the year’s best so far (and take this from one who earlieer wanted to avoid the movie like the plague). It has uniformly good performance by the cast, which includes Mat Ranillo III, Anita Linda, Fred Motnilla, Anna Gonzales, Laila Dee, Mary Walter, Ann Villegas, and the two lead, Vasquez and especially Vilma Santos who has done a surprisingly intelligent and affecting character portrayal.

Not since Romero’s Sinong Kapiling have we seen screen characters who think and behave and react to situations and problems like mature, sensitive and intelligent people. The characters do give way to occassional hysterical outbursts, but they somehow wake up to their senses before they forget themselves completely. And they are people in believable situations with real problems and genuine emotions. When they talk, they are seldom silly, and when they are silly, they are aware of it. But even when they’re silly or trite, they are never unsympathetic. Their conversations, in fact, are the most sophisticated heard in a local movie in a long time – shrewd, wry, loving, crisp and smart. You have to hand it to Bernal for making even a casual advertisement for motorcycle brand sound so much like an indispensable part of the dialogue. The story is simple enough, but the details can be so complicated. Twenty three year old Terry (Vilma) abandons her immature boyfriend and runs away with a married man against the vehement protestations of her parents. This is a common plot reworked to death in other movies. In another writer-director’s hans, the story would walk the tightrope between stale romantic melodrama and sensationalized New Morality expose, but Bernal invests it with such subtlety, sympathy, affection and full understanding, though inevitably with some slight cynicism, too, that he actually elevates the story into a search by intelligent people for meaning in human and personal relationships. – Mario A. Hernando, The Philippines Daily Express, Oct 21 1977 (READ MORE)

“…The 1977 Urian Awards further established the reputation of the Manunuris as discoverers of new or ignored talents. Word spread around that “you don’t have to spend a cent for PR to win in the Urian” after Daria Ramirez (Sino’ng Kapiling, Sino’ng Kasiping) bested formidable co-nominee Vilma Santos (Burlesk Queen) for the best actress plum. The choice of Ramirez was not a popular one either, for her portrayal of a middle-class wife was devoid of the “pang-FAMAS” hysterics usually equated with good acting in Philippine movies. The most significant event of 1977, however, was the debate on which criterion should take precedence in choosing the best film: cinematic style or filmic content? It had been decided before that if two films were equally well-made, the film with the more significant content would be chosen. But the application of the criterion became very difficult with the two films being deliberated on: Robert Arevalo’s Hubad na Bayani and Ishmael Bernal’s Dalawang Pugad, Isang Ibon. Hubad is a truthful portrayal of the peasant uprisings of the 30’s, but it was marred by technical flaws. Dalawang Pugad, centering on the problem of infidelity, was narrower in scope but was just as truthful in its portrayal. Hubad had its good moments but was uneven as a whole, while Dalawang Pugad had a tighter orchestration of cinematic elements. Which film should be given more weight? To an observer, the answer would have been obvious, but, taken in context, at the time when so many tired formula films on “the other woman” were being made, the achievement of Bernal’s film could not be underestimated. The upshot was that Hubad won as best picture and Bernal was awarded best director for Dalawang Pugad…” – The Urian Anthology 1970-79, Video 48, 24 May 2011 (READ MORE)

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Filmography: Rubia Servios (1978)

“Hayup! Hayup! Hayuuuup!” – Rubia Servios

“Nahihibang ako sa pagnanasa sa iyo, ilang libong beses na kitang hinuhubaran sa aking isipan, pinagsasamantalahan sa aking pangarap!…Ito’y isang pagsubok sa ating pagmamahalan, kahit ano pa ang nangyari sa iyo, mahal kita, kailangan kita!…” – Willie Trizon

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Basic Information: Direction: Lino Brocka; Screenplay: Mario O’Hara; Cast: Vilma Santos, Mat Ranillo III, Phillip Salvador, Estrella Kuenzler, Esther Chaves, Carpi Asturias, Jess Ramos, Leah de Guzman, Mark Verzosa; Cinematography: Conrado Baltazar; Editing: Jose H. Tarnate; Music: Freddie Aguilar; Production Company: Sampaguita Pictures, Inc.; Release Date: December 25, 1978; “Rubia Servios (Case No. 63572)” (1978); Office Entry to The 4th (1978) Metro Manila Film Festival Entry; Based on an “Unforgettable Legal Story” by Aida Sevilla Mendoza; Theme Song: “Pag-subok” composed and sang by Freddie Aguilar

Plot Description: Medical intern Rubia Servios (Vilma Santos) is engaged to Dr. Norman Ignacio (Mat Ranillo III), but persistent suitor Willy Trison (Phillip Salvador) refuses to give up. On the day of the death of Norman’s father, she is abducted by Willy and brought to an island. She is repeatedly raped and offered marriage by Willy. She turns him down and warns him that she will bring matters to the police. However, he is confident that she will not press a case against him as she will not want the stigma of a rape victim. Rubia is released and she brings him to court. Willy is sentenced to six to ten years in prison. Rubia discovers she is pregnant and the steadfast Dr. Norman Ignacio proposes marriage. She gives birth to Willy’s daughter, Vivian, and they leave for Canada. Rubia wants a child by Norman and they have a son. Years later, they return to Manila. There are mysterious calls on the telephone. It is Willy and he wants his daughter. Rubia and Norman hide Vivian and plan to leave for the American continent. However, Willy is able to kidnap the child with the help of an ice cream vendor. She is brought to the island and she begins to look to him as her real father. But she also wants her mother. Willy calls Rubia and tells her to join them in the island. Rubia refuses. There is a confrontation between Norman and Willy. Norman is beaten up. Still Rubia is adamant. She becomes terrified when Willy sets up a headless child in a remote area, the discovery of which is sensationalized in the tabloids. Finally Rubia agrees to join him. She takes the motorized banca with Willy as the pilot. In the middle of the sea, she takes a paddle and hits Willy. Willy falls into the water. Rubia takes her gun and shoots him. The banca reaches the island. Rubia is happy to see Vivian alive. As an epilogue, Rubia and Norman leave for the States where they are presently residing. – Lino Brocka: The Artist and His Times, reposted Simon Santos, Video48, 29 December 2018 (READ MORE)

Sa umpisa ng pelikula, makikitang nag-aaral pa lamang si Rubia (Vilma Santos), Norman Ignacio (Mat Ranillo III) at Willie Trizon (Philip Salvador). Masugid na manliligaw ni Rubia si Willie kahit na alam na nito na may nobyo na siya’t pakakasal na sila sa pagkatapos ng taon. Nang malaman ni Willie na pakakasal na si Rubia ay naging desperado ito’t plinano na kidnapin si Rubia. Isang araw habang naghihintay ito ng taxi sa kalye ay hinablot siya nga pat na lalaki na tauhan ni Willie. Dinalo siya ni Willie sa isang cottage sa Cavite. Nagtangka si Rubia na tumakas at tumakbo sa labas. Duon siya ginahasa ni Willie sa tabing dagat. Matapos gahasain ay nagtangkang magpakalunod si Rubia ngunit pinigil siya ni Willie at binalik sa cottage. Pinag-isipan ni Rubia kung paano niya mapipilit si Willie na pawalan siya. Tinanong niya si Willie kung anong gusto nitong mangyari. Sinabi nitong gusto niyang pakasalan siya. Pumayag si Rubia na magpakasal ngunit kailangan nitong ipaalam sa kanyang mga magulang ang nangyari sa kanya. Natagpuan naman ng pamilya ni Rubia siya sa ospital at duon nito nagpasya na maghabla. Matapos ang hearing sa korte sa kabila ng pagmamakaawa ng pamilya ni Willie ay nasentensiyahan siya ng anim na taon sa bilanguan at magbayad ng 70,000 pesos. Samantala nanatiling nakakulong sa kuwarto si Rubia matapos ang kaso. Pinilit ni Norman na kausapin ang katipan at dito nalaman niya na ang dahilan ng pagkukulong sa kuwarto ni Rubia’y buntis ito. Pinasya ni Norman na bigyan ng pangalan ang pinabuntis ni Rubia at nagpakasal ang dalawa.

Nanatiling tahimik ang buhay ng dalawa’t nagkaroon pa sila ng isa pang anak. Nang 3 years old na ang batang naging anak niya kay Willie’y nag-umpisang mangulo na naman ito. Si Willie’y nakalabas ng kulungan pagkatapos ng tatlong taon lamang. Nung una’y pinagkaila ni Rubia sa asawa ang mga tawag ni Willie. Ngunit napuna na rin ito ni Norman nang mapuna niyang madalas ang asawa na umuuwi ng maaga sa bahay at nag-umpisang uminom ng valium at naging magugulatin ito. Pinagtapat na rin ni Rubia sa asawa ang panggugulo ni Willie at pumayag ito na payagan si Rubia na makipagkita kay Willie. Nang malaman ni Rubia kung saan sila magkikita’y si Norman ang pumunta sa usapan. Ang resulta’y nabugbog ito ng mga tauhan ni Willie. Dahil rito’y naging maliwanag na hindi sila titigilan ni Willie lalo pa’t minsa’y takutin si Rubia nang wala si Norman sa bahay at pumunta si Willie’t pinatay ang aso nila. Wala naman magawa ang mga polis dahil wala silang hard evidence na si Willie nga’y nanggugulo sa buhay nila. Pinasya ni Norman at Rubia na umalis na nang bansa at bumalik sa Canada kung saan sila ilang taon ring nag-aral bago naging doctor. Pinasya rin nila na ibigay sa kanyang mga magulang ang dalawang bata para sa kanilang safety.

Sa kasamaang palad, kinidnap ni Willie ang anak nila ni Rubia na si Vivian. Nagpunta sila sa mga pulis ngunit wala pa ring magawa ang mga ito dahil wala silang ebidensiya. Kinontak ni Willie si Vivian at gusto nitong makipagkita siya rito. Pumayag si Norman ngunit sumonod rin ito sa usapan. Kasama ng kanyang mga alagad iniwanan ni Willie ang magasawa at binantaan na sa susunod magsisisi sila sa kanilang ginawa dahil nga ang usapan ay si Rubia lamang ang gusto niyang makita. Tinakot pa ni Willie si Rubia’t kumuha ito ng bankay na bata at isinuot ang damit ng anak ni Rubia. Nalathala ito sa mga diyaryo at pinuntahan ni Rubia ang bankay laking pasasalamat nito’t hindi ang anak ang bangkay. Dahil rito’y nagpasya na si Rubia na kitain si Willie na hindi alam ni Norman. Kinita nga ni Rubia si Willie ngunit nasundan rin pala si Rubia ni Norman. Sa tulong ng mga alagad ni Willie ay itinali ng mga ito sa puno si Norman at muling ginahasa nito si Rubia sa harap ni Norman. Nagsisigaw ito ngunit walang siyang nagawa. Kahit ayaw ni Rubia ay napapayag rin siya dahil papatayin ni Willie ang kanyang asawa. Pagkatapos nito’y binugbog ng mga tauhan ni Willie si Norman at sinama si Rubia papunta sa kanilang anak. Sa dagat papunta sa isla kung saan naruon si Vivian ay kinausap ni Willie ang dino-dios niyang si Rubia. Pinangako nito na matututunan rin niyang mahalin siya. Hindi napansin ni Willie na nakahawak si Rubia sa sagwan ng bangka at ilang ulit nitong pinalo sa ulo ang nabiglang si Willie habang sinasabi ang salitang “hayup!” Hinanap nito ang baril at pinagbabaril rin niya ang nahulog sa dagat na si Willie. Narating ni Rubia ang isla at duon nito nakita ang kanyang anak na buhay na buhay at tinatawag ang kanyang pangalan. The End. – RV

Film Achievement: 1978 FAMAS: Best Picture Nomination; 1978 Gawad Urian: Best Cinematography Nomination – Conrado Baltazar; Best Editing Nomination – Jose Tarnate; 1978 Metro Manila Film Festival: Best Performer Nomination – Vilma Santos; Best Editing – Jose Tarnate; Best Screenplay – Mario O’Hara; Box Office Revenue – Top Grosser

Film Reviews: Mula sa screenplay ni Mario O”hara, ang Rubia Servios ay may mabilis na paglalahad ng buhay ni Rubia at ang mga kahayupang dumating sa kanya sa palad ng isang anak ng makapangyarihan pamilya. Halatang binusisi ni Lino Brockha ang pelikula’t binigyang pansin ang mga eksenang may pagkabayolente. Dalawang beses na ginahasa ni Philip si Vilma at sa bawat eksena’y makikita ang kahalayan at pagnanasa sa mga mata ni Philip at makikita ang sakit na dulot nito sa katauhan ni Vilma. Maraming eksena kung saan inalagaan ni Lino ang pagarte ni Vilma. Hindi lamang sa rape scenes kungdi sa mga tahimik na eksena. Una na nang umagang gumising siya pagkatapos ng unang rape scene. Makikita sa mukha ni Vilma ang pagkalito at ilang sandali pa’y ang pagtanggap ng nangyari sa kanya ng gabing una siyang ginaahasa sa tabing dagat. Pangalawa, nang pumayag si Philip na pakawalan si Rubia at mapunta ito sa ospital. Pagkabukas nang kanyang mata at makita si Norman, makikita sa mga mata niya ang hirap na dinanas. Sa court scene kung saan sinasabi niya na “gusto ko siyang patayin” ng paulit-ulit. Sa bandang huli kung saan nalaman niya na hindi ang anak niya ang putol putol na batang bangkay makikita sa mata niya’t mukha ang biglang pagkatuwa’t hindi ito ang kanyang anak. At sa bandang huli pa rin kung saan ginahasa siya muli sa harap ng kanyang asawa. Makikita ang pagsuko niya’t pagkatalo. Makikita sa kanyang mukha ang pagod at hirap hanggang sa boat scene kung saan pinalad siyang makuha ang sagwan at nagkaroon ng pagkakataong paluin si Willie ng pa-ulit-ulit at hindi pa ito nasiyahan at binaril pa niya ang nangahasa sa kanya. Sa eksenang ito makikita ang kaibahan ng kakayahan sa pagarte ni Vilma. Sa eksenang ito kung saan sinasabi niya ang salitang “hayup!” sabay palo sa nabiglang si Willie. Buong katawan niya ang umaarte. Ito ay hango sa tunay na buhay. Hindi katulad ng arte ni Nora Aunor sa Ina Ka Ng Anak Mo kung saan nahuli niyang nagsiping ang kanyang asawa sa kanyang ina. Nakapokos ang kamera sa mukha niya at nag-emote ng parehong salita: “Hayup!” ang paulit-ulit niyang salita. Aba kung sa tunay na buhay iyan eh nagkasabunutan na at nagwala na ang mag-ina!

Para sa akin naging matagumpay si Vilma sa kanyang pagganap bilang si Rubia Servios. Isang tour de force. Nuong una ko itong napanood sa Avenida ay namangha ako sa kanyang galing. Ngayon pagkatapos ng dalawanput siyam na taon pinanood ko muli ito’y hindi nababawasan ang aking pagkamangha sa galing niya. Paano mo ba isasalarawan ang babae na nagahasa? Paano mo ba isasalarawan ang babaeng nakidnapan ng anak at muling nagahasa sa harap pa mismo ng asawa mo? Isang mahirap na papel. At naisalarawan ito ni Vilma nang makatotohanan. Walang mga pagpopokos ng kamera para mag-emote. Makatotohanang pagganap. Special mention sina Mat Ranillo III at Philip Salvador. Dapat ay napahalagahan sila sa pamamagitan ng nomination subalit naging maramot ang organisasyon ng pestibal at isang acting awards lamang ang binigay nila. Panalo sana si Philip Salvador ng best actor award rito dahil damang dama mo ang kanyang karakter. Makikita rin kung gaano kaganda ng kanyang katawan. Meron eksena siya na nakaswimming trunks lang at talagang alaga pa niya ang kanyang katawan nuon. Si Mat naman ay sana nanominate bilang best supporting actor. Mahusay rin siya lalo na sa eksena kung saan nakatali siya sa puno at wala siyang nagawa ng pagsamantalahan muli si Rubia sa harapan niya ni Philip.

Technically, nang panoorin ko itong pelikulang ito ay maganda ang resulta ngunit nang panoorin ko muli ng ilang beses ngayon ay makikita ang ilang flaws. Una na ang cinematography ni Conrado Baltazar. Maraming eksena ay hindi nasa tamang angulo. Merong eksena na nagsasalita si Ate Vi pero ang nakikita lamang ay ang kanyang nuo. Ang musical score ni Freddie Aguilar ay parang hindi bagay sa tema ng pelikula. Pati ang theme song na “Pagsubok” parang pang-politika at very “folksy” ang dating. Merong isang butas ang screenplay ni Mario O Harra. Nang umalis si Philip para iwanan si Vivian, ang anak niyang kinidnap, nang umalis ito’y sumakay ito ng kotse, pagkatapos nang dalhin niya si Rubia sa banding huli’y sumakay naman sila ng boat. Medyo nakaligtaan nila ang isang detalye na ito. Mabilis ang pacing na pelikula at maraming mga eksena talaga si Vilma na makikita mo ang pagaalaga ni Lino. Sayang nga lamang at hindi ito nakita ng mga hurado ng pestibal at maging ang mga manunuri ng taong iyon. – RV

Undoubtedly, the two best entries in the 1978 Metro Manila Film Festival are Atsay and Rubia Servios. Atsay is remarkable in several ways. It has a strong social message, aimed at primarily those who forget that house cleaners are also human beings. In the character of Mrs. Anton (Angie Ferro), screenwriter Edgar M. Reyes is able to embody the thousand faults which middle-class housewives are heir to. Atsay can also pride itself on being truly Filipino. Its mood is set by its Pilipino credits (in sharp contrast to the English credits of the other entries). The film deliberately exploits local color, dwelling not only on rural but also on picturesque urban scenes. The story, needless to say, can happen only in the Philippines, where domestics and beerhouses are national institutions. But the most striking thing about Atsay is its cinematography (Romeo Vitug). The slow dissolves, the multiple exposures (such as the brilliant train sequence), the surprising angles, the flawless composition—this border on genius. The cinematography is so extraordinary, in fact, that it covers a multitude of sins. The most grievous sin of all is the ending. In the end, Nelia (Nora Aunor), after having been humiliated, beaten, raped, dehumanized by the vultures of the city, decides to stay in the city anyway in the hope that an impoverished construction worker (Ronald Corveau) will make her live happily ever after. Such ending, while assuring the viewer that human nature is not totally evil, is unmotivated and, in fact, goes against the very theme of the story. For Atsay is the story of how the city dehumanizes, of how human beings become swine (this point is made through blatant symbolism in a shot of Nelia inside a cage-like jeep), of how Manila is a prison (note Vitug’s several shots of cage-like structures). “Atsay” is a story of how individuals are no match against the cruelty of the city. The construction worker, for example, becomes the victim of a construction accident. A young pretty virgin from the province is raped while she’s drugged. A kind-hearted old man is shot down while protesting against exploitation. The ending of Atsay contradicts the film’s affirmations. It would have been much more in keeping with the theme (not to mention the current concerns of the national human settlements program), if Nelia were shown rejecting the city and, in hope, returning to her province for a new life.

Rubia Servios, on the other hand, does not dilute the message. Willy (Phillip Salvador), the son of a powerful and wealthy figure, is portrayed as totally evil, devoid of any redeeming quality. To screenwriter Mario O’Hara and director Lino Brocka, the province is the same as the city. Rubia Servios (Vilma Santos) is raped both in the city and in the country. Rubia kills Willy in the country. Violence unites all places. It is the “unity” of conception, scripting, design, and direction, in fact, that Rubia Servios is superior to Atsay. Lino Brocka does not waste shots in his attempt to create a Filipino classical tragedy. He subordinates everything to the building up of one emotion in the viewer, that of hatred of Willy. So despicable does Willy become at the end that, when he is murdered by Rubia, no viewer can say that Rubia is at fault. And yet, morally speaking, no one is allowed to take the law into his own hands. The law, in fact, put Willy in prison for the first rape. There is no reason to think that the law will not put Willy to death for the second rape. By conditioning the reader to condone Rubia’s revenge, Brocka succeeds in questioning one of our deeply rooted moral beliefs. The unity that characterizes Rubia Servios contrasts sharply with the tendency of Eddie Garcia in Atsay to exploit Vitug’s versatility even at the expense of tightness. There are shots in Atsay, for example, which could easily be cut without hurting the film’s integrity. Even the train sequence, one of the best sequences in Atsay, is far too long. Rubia Servios is Lino Brocka’s film; Atsay is Romeo Vitug’s. Nora does an excellent acting job; but so does Vilma Santos, and Rubia is a much more demanding and difficult role. Edgardo M. Reyes is an established literary figure, but Mario O’Hara is much better screenwriter. Overall, Atsay may be much more impressive than Rubia Servios. In terms of challenging our moral and legal convictions, however, Rubia Servios is much more significant. – Isagani Cruz, TV Times, 1979

Kung uri ang paguusapan, de-kalidad ang Rubia Servios. Kaya lamang, may sabit. Maraming butas ang iskrip ni mario O’Hara. Ang istorya ng Rubia Servios ay batay sa mga legal story ni Aida Sevilla Mendoza, at ito’y pumapaksa sa babaeng ginahasa ng kanyang masugid na manliligaw. Si Rubia (Vilma Santos) ay isang medical student na may kasintahang kaeskuweala, si Norman (Mat Ranillo III). Balak nilang magpakasal pagkatapos ng kanilang pag-aaral. Karibal ni Norman si Willie (Philip Salvador) na ayaw tumanggap ng kabiguan sa pag-ibig. Anak siya ng mayaman at maipluwensiyang pamilya sa Kabite. Kaya nang tapatin siya ng dalaga na wala siyang maaasahan, kinidnap niya si Rubia sa isang bahay-bakasyunan at ginahasa ito. Nang magkaroon ng pagkakataon ang babae, tumakas ito at isinuplong si Willie. Idinemanda ang lalaki at nahatulang mabilanggo ng anim na taon. Paglabas ng lalaki sa bilangguan, ginulo na naman niya ang buhay ng babae na ngayo’y asawa na ni Norman at may dalawang anak (ang una’y anak niya kay Willie). Dahil sa pananakot ng hui, nakipagtagpo si Rubia, at muli na namang ginahasa sa sementeryo sa harapan pa naman ng asawa. Kinidnap ni Willie ang anak niya para gawing pain sa pagtatagpo nila ni Rubia at para sumama na tio sa kanya. Ngunit nagkakaroon na naman ng pagkakaton ang babae na lumaban at sa bangka, hinampas niya si Willie ng sagwan, at pagkatapos ay binaril ang lalaki hanggang sa ito’y tuluyan nang malunod.

Simplistiko ang materyal at lalong simplistiko ang pamamaraan ni O’Hara sa karakterisasyon. Nagmumukha tanga ang mga tauhan (si Rubia at si Norman) samantalang medical students at naturingang doktor pa naman sial. Tinatakot na sila’y hindi pa sila humingi ng proteksiyon sa pulis. Ginahasa na si Rubia ay nakipagtagpo pa sa sementeryong madilim nang nag-iisa at nagpaganda pa mandin siya nang husto. At ang asawa niya’y wala ring utak. Biro mong sinundan ang asawa sa sementeryo nang nag-iisa! Dapat nga palang magkaganito sila kung napakakitid ng kanilang utak. Sa direksiyon ni Brocka, lumitaw ang galing ni Vilma Santos, at nakontrol ang labis na pagpapagalaw ng kanyang labi. Mahusay din ang eksena ng gahasa. Si Philip Salvador naman ay tulad sa isang masunuring estudyante na sinusunod lahat ang direksiyon ng guro. Kitang-kita mo sa kanyang pagganap ang bawat tagubiling pinaghihirapan niyang masunod: kilos ng mata, buntong-hininga, galaw ng daliri, kislot ng kilay. Limitado ang kanyang kakayahan at makikia ito sa kanyang mukha (na limitado rin). Walang-wala rtio si Mat Ranillo III, na parang pinabayaan para lalong lumitaw ang papel at pag-arte ni Salvador. Samantala, ang kamera ni Conrado Salvador ay hindi gaanong nakalikha ng tension at suspense, bukod sa napakaliwanang ng disenyo ng produksiyon ang pagbabago ng mga tauhan sa loob ng pitong taon batay sa estilo ng damit at buhok. – Justino M. Dormiendo, Sagisag, February 1979 (READ MORE)

“…Mula sa isang real life legal story ang Rubia Servios, namumuhunan ito sa ideya na ang masasaksihan ng mga manonood sa iskrin ay hindi likhang-isip lamang kundi talagang nangyari sa tunay na buhay. Hinimok ni Lino Brocka sa kanyang pelikula na pagmasdan ang babae sa konteksto ng ating lipunan. Bakit ganito ang nangyayari sa kababaihan? Dahil tinatanggap nating maging ganoon ang kanilang kundisyon sa lipunan. Kung pagkakasala ang pabayaang maghari ang mayayamang may kapangyarihan, nararapat lamang na ituwid ang pagkakasalang ito. Sa mga nakakaalam ng mga pelikula ni Brocka, pamilyar ang paggamit sa estratehiya ng melodrama. Sa ganitong paraan, ang focus ay ang paghihirap na pinagdaraanan ng pangunahing tauhang babae at ito ang nakababagbag sa damdamin ng manonood. Ngunit sa pagpuntirya ng emosyon, hindi matamaan ang paglinaw sa tunay na isyu. Si Vilma Santos bilang Rubia Servios ay hindi lamang mahusay na gumanap sa buhay ni Rubia kundi naging isa ring makapangyarihang talinghaga na nakapagpalusog sa teksto ng pelikula. Sa kabuuan, inaangkin ng pelikulang Rubia Servios ang kapangyarihan nitong lumikha ng katotohanan mula sa masalimuot na materyal ng reyalidad. Sa ganitong proseso, nailalantad ang isang piraso ng reyalidad upang mapanood, masuri at mabigyang-kahulugan. Sa kabilang banda, hindi rin makakatakas ang pelikula sa mga diskursong kumakanlong sa mismong puinupuna at tinutuligsa nito…” – Jojo Devera, Sari-saring Sineng Pinoy (READ MORE)

The Screenplay – “…Mario Herrero O’Hara (born April 20, 1946 – died 26 June 2012) was an award-winning Filipino film director, film producer and screenwriter known for his sense of realism often with dark but realistic social messages…In 1978, he wrote the screenplay for Lino Brocka’s Rubia Servos. This led to the first award in his film career (Best Screenplay at the Metro Manila Film Festival)…” – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

“…There are certain themes that keep the public captive and enthralled through relentless manufacture of a thematic repertoire which ensures the preponderance of sex in stories and daily narratives. These themes need not be perceived as always proferring false consciousness, but as reiterating the social problems implicated by cinematic and industrial mediation of sexual expression. The theme of rite of passage, from innocence and youth to carnal knowledge, fastens the narrative to the body of the virgin whose initiation into the desires of the world transforms her into a “whore.” The stigma of this rite of passage is exploited from every possible angle, from ablutions in the river to rape scenes and on to the erstwhile virgin suddenly craving flesh herself…Rape likewise presents an occasion for baring the body. Brutal (1980), Rubia Servios (1978), Angela Markado (1980), and even the massacre films hatched in the bizarre mind of Carlo J. Caparas discuss rape almost clinically and therefore subject the body of the woman to another round of autopsy, this time through the prying eyes of a public reared in a daily history of sex…” – Patrick D. Flores, Bodies of Work: Sexual Circulations in Philippine Cinema (READ MORE)

New Screen Persona – “…After years of this unfair competition, Vilma decided to stop playing the also-ran, and opted to essay the roles that Nora preferred not to do, -the other woman, rape victim, burlesque dancer, etc. Vilma’s sexy movies were more suggestive than anything else, but they gave her a new screen persona that made her a distinct movie entity from Nora. Fact is, Nora could also have played sensual characters, but she felt awkward doing so, and Vilma benefited from her reticence. In time, Vilma was also winning acting awards and starring in big hits, so the competition between her and Nora peaked…” – Nestor U. Torre, Philippine Daily Inquirer, 2002 (READ MORE)

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Filmography: Relaks ka Lang, Sagot Kita (1994)

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Basic Information: Directed: Danilo Cabreira; Cast: Vilma Santos, Ramon ‘Bong’ Revilla Jr., Anthony Alonzo, Vic Vargas, Archie Adamos, Telly Babasa, Perla Bautista, Manjo del Mundo, King Gutierrez, Subas Herrero, Edgar Mande, Ros Olgado, Tom Olivar, Oliver Osorio, Mat Ranillo III, Edwin Reyes, Ruby Rodriguez, Vic Varrion, Jane Zaleta; Executive producer: Charo Santos-Concio

Plot Description: Lt. Daniel Santiago (Ramon ‘Bong’ Revilla, Jr.) is a police officer who captures the infamous Warlito Gan (Anthony Alonzo), leader of a notorious crime syndicate. Wanting to take revenge on Lt. Santiago, Warlito Gan moves his group of corrupt police officers to pin a murder to Santiago. And despite efforts of defending himself, Santiago loses his fight to the staunch lawyer Vera Villaverde (Vilma Santos). Having no hope of finding justice in court, Lt. Santiago desperately escapes prison and takes Vera as hostage. Luckily, Vera learns of Daniel’s situation and decides to help him clear his name. But going back won’t be simple, for Vera and Daniel will have to survive the horde of assassins Warlito Gan unleashed after them. – ABS-CBN (READ MORE)

Film Achievement: “…Revilla followed his father’s footsteps when he entered the showbiz industry with the movie “Dugong Buhay.” He has done various films and won a couple of acting awards. Revilla was conferred Best Actor by the Filipino Academy of Movie Arts and Sciences (FAMAS) Awards for the movie “Relaks Ka Lang Sagot Kita” in 1994…” – Gerome Vedeja (READ MORE)

Film Review: No Available Data