Filmography: Phantom Lady (1974)

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Basic Information: Director: Leonardo L. Garcia; Writers: Cora M. Crisol (story), Nilo Saez (screenplay); Cast: Vilma Santos, Nick Romano, Paquito Diaz, Rodolfo ‘Boy’ Garcia, Cristina Reyes, Max Alvarado, Angero Goshi, Angel Confiado, Bino Garcia, Greg Lozano, Francisco Cruz, Angelito, Steve Alcarado, Pons De Guzman, Edward Torres, Jack Montes, SOS Daredevils, Pmp Commandos; Music: Tito Arevalo; Cinematography: Ricardo Herrera; Production Co: Silver Film Productions; Released Date: 28 February 1974 (Philippines) (IMDB)

Plot Description: Blind Vilma fights bad guys as Phantom Lady!

Film Achievement: Box Office Hit of 1974

Film Review: “…There was a time in the 70s, particularly in 1973 and 1974, when a spate of Pinoy fantasy films featuring Pinoy superheroes graced our big screens. I think it was Vilma Santos’ Lipad Darna Lipad that started it all. It ushered in this wave of so-called trend in fantasy movies. Besides Darna, Vilma came up with Wonder Vi (1973), Phantom Lady (1974) and Vivian Volta (1974); Nora Aunor had Super Gee (1973) based on a popular komik serial; Superman and Batman had their local counterparts in Zoom, Zoom Superman (1973) with Ariel Ureta and Fight Batman Fight with Victor Wood. Vilma came out with another sequel of Darna titled Darna and the Giants, also in 1973; Dolphy had his own version of Captain Barbell in Captain Barbell Boom (1973). It was the movie, Supergirl (1973) which starred Pinky, that made a major impact among the moviegoers that time. It was a surprise hit that year. It was reshown several times due to insistent public demand…” – Simon Santos (READ MORE)

Filmography: Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz (1974)

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Basic Information: Directed: Augusto Buenaventura; Screenplay, story: Augusto Buenaventura, Ruben Rustia; Cast: Charito Solis, Vilma Santos, Dante Rivero, Eddie Garcia, Paquito Diaz, Ruben Rustia, Raul Aragon, Estrella Kuenzler, Ernie Zarate, Mandy Bustamante, Ruel Vernal, Robert Talby, Bert Laforteza, Angero Goshi, George Henson, Sam Jorge, Pons De Guzman, Mary Martin, Lito Cruz, The PMP Boys, The SOS Daredevils; Executive producer: Emilia Blass; Original Music: Restie Umali; Cinematography: Fortunato Bernardo

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: One of six (and the first!) Solis and Santos’ collaborations (Happy Days are Here Again, Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz, Modelong Tanso, Ipagpatawad Mo, Dahil Mahal Kita The Dolzura Cortez Story, Hanggang Ngayon Ika’y Minamahal) – RV (READ MORE)

Film Review: “Ooops! Keep your cool, dear Noranians, and listen to Charito Solis’ explanation before you accuse her of being, uh, “maka-Vilma. “Vilma has a wider range as an actress while Nora is limited and typecast in certain roles,” Charito said in a tone devoid of intrigue, answering our question in a straightforward, matter-of-fact manner. “Si Vilma, puede kahit anong role, kahit bold. You can’t imagine Nora doing a bold role, can you?” But, and that’s the big but, “Nora has more depth than Vilma,” Charito added, “and it’s because of her expressive eyes. Nora is very effective in scenes where she doesn’t say anything, just act with her eyes, at “yan ang kulang ni Vilma. Vilma has to say something to be effective.” Charito has worked with Vilma twice (in “Mga Tigre ng SierraCruz” and “Modelong Tanso”) and with Nora once (“Minsan May Isang Ina”). Speaking in general now, said Charito, “Vilma is the better actress.” We asked Charito that ticklish question during the lunch presscon for her latest movie, the star-studded Mother’s Day offering of Regal Films titled “Dear Mama,” which also stars Gloria Romero, Laurice Guillen, Snooky, Janice de Belen, Julie Vega, Manilyn Reynes, Jaypee de Guzman, Rey “PJ” Abellana and Alicia Alonzo in the title role. Our own personal opinion somehow jibes with that of Charito whose “throne,” I suppose, will be inherited by Vilma (while Nora will inherit the “throne” of the other drama queen, Lolita Rodriguez).” – Ricardo F. Lo, The Phil. Star April 031984 (READ MORE)

“…To the right are the living quarters, including the high ceiling bedrooms topped with transoms or carved room vents for air circulation. The expansive dining room features an old-fashioned banguerra, where tableware and glasses are left to dry. This area of the house figured prominently in the 1972 shooting of the Vilma Santos-Dante Rivero-Charito Solis war-themed movie, Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz…” – Heritage Conservation Society (HCS) (READ MORE)

“…Charito Solis, who initially had a tempestuous and hostile relationship with Vilma while making the ill-fated but box-office MMFF champ Modelong Tanso, had a change of heart when the reborn versatile/professional/charismatic actress Vilma impressed her through the years, at idineklara niya sa buong mundo, without batting an eyelash. na di hamak na mas magaling na aktres si Vilma kaysa kay Nora Aunor. Walang kumontra kay Chato dahil totoo ang sinabi niya, si La Solis yata iyan, at pati nga si Amalia Fuentes, another certified Vilmanian, at “kaaway” na mortal ni La Solis, ay sumang-ayon sa kanya. Si Susan Roces, ano naman kaya ang opinion niya sa obserbasyon ni Chato? Ah, Nida Blanca. Ang dami nilang pinagsamahan ni Vilma, mula TV hanggang sa movies. Dati ay una sa billing si Nida, subali’t dahil nga sa gulong ng buhay ay kailangang maging praktikal at handa ka sa katotohanang magiging second lead ka lang in the future. Walang problema sina Nida at Vilma – ke mag-Ate o mag-Ina sila sa mga proyekto, may chemistry sila and mutual respect. Patok ang kanilang pagsasama. Remember their mother and daughter roles in Ibulong Mo Sa Diyos? Sayang at wala na ang original versatile movie and dancing queen Nida – mapa-aksiyon (Babaing Isputnik), musical (Huwag Kang Sumingit with Gloria Romero), comedy (Waray-waray) at drama (Miguelito at Magdusa Ka!). Kung tutuusin ay tunay na maigsi ang ating hiram na buhay. Kung buhay nga lang ang mga nabanggit sa itaas ay mas lalu sanang makulay ang daigdig ng sining. Subali’t ang lahat ay may katapusan. Ating suriin ang mga sumusunod na talata…” – Mario O. Garces (READ MORE)

“…The best part of the shoot was meeting the stars of the movie in person. I became an instant Ate Vi fan when she obliged the townpeople gathered outside the gate with a personal appearance, waving her hands to the crowd below from the balcony. The whole town just went mad. Later, with my portable cassette recorder, I even managed to interview Ate Vi, asking how she could possibly retain her composure despite her stardom. I asked a lot of showbiz questions that would put Ricky Lo to shame. I kept playing our recorded conversations for months after that, until I lost the cassette tape. Co-starring with Vilma in the movie was another Kapampangan, Dante Rivero (aka, Luisito Mayer Jr., from Floridablanca). Unlike Ate Vi who was always game, Dante was not too accommodating, brushing my request for interview with a terse “Can I talk later?”. But he took a shine to my cousin Beng, who later asked her for a date. I was also luckless with supporting actor Ruel Vernal, who intimidated me with his height. Charito Solis, a co-starrer, was unfortunately not part of any scenes that were for shooting here…When it was all over, the house and its garden were a mess, with most of the flowering plants in the garden dead and trampled. Worse, when the movie was finally shown in local theaters after months of anticipation, the house was just seen on screen for a minute or so, I could barely recognize it. Even the part of the Filipina househelp played by a local Mabalacat girl was edited out, her 15 minutes of fame down the drain. I don’t think “Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz” made a killing in the box office, either. Many shootings have been held at the grand Morales mansion since then—the most recent one was undertaken by U.P. film students in March 2009. But old folks who pass by the street still point to the old mansion and refer to it as “the house where they shot the movie ‘Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz’ starring Vilma Santos and Dante Rivero…” – Alex R. Castro (READ MORE)

“…The expansive dining room features an old-fashioned banggera, where table ware and glasses are left to air-dry. This area of the house figured prominently in the 1972 shooting of the Vilma Santos-Dante Rivero-Charito Solis war-themed movie, “Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz”. A utility wing is conjoined with the dining area. A small veranda and the white-tiled bathroom are found here, complete with claw foot porcelain tubs and modern plumbing. Space flows from one room to another leading you to the kitchen and semi-enclosed azotea with stairs that you down almost down the Sapang Balen bank…” – Alex R. Castro, Views from Pangpang, Dec 10 2008 (READ MORE)

“…She had come to Mabalacat to film the war movie, “Mga Tigre ng Sierra Cruz”and several key scenes were to be filmed in my granduncle’s old house in Sta. Ines, conveniently right next to ours. That meant instant access to the production, as we were the designated caretakers of the Morales mansion. The enviable task of fetching Vilma from an undisclosed hotel to be brought to the house was assigned to my father. To get to the shooting venue without attracting the attention of the motley crowd to get a glimpse of the stars, Vilma was whisked off to our own house which had a connecting passage to my relatives’place. For the next three days, I fell under the spell of Ate Vi—easily transforming me from a Noranian to Vilmanian. More so when, during a lull moment in the shoot, I had the gumption to talk to her (her co-star Dante Rivero refused to be interviewed!), and I even managed to put on tape our short conversation which began with her greeting ”To all the people of Mabalacat, I love you all!!”. Who wouldn’t be charmed by her sweetness? (Though I bet that was a standard line she said to ALL the people in ALL the towns she visited)…” – Alex R. Castro, Views from Pangpang, Sep 10 2012 (READ MORE)

Filmography: Batya’t Palu-Palo (1974)

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Basic Information: Directed: Pablo Santiago; Screenplay: Fred Navarro; Cast: Fernando Poe Jr., Vilma Santos, Fred Montilla, Mila del Sol, Dencio Padilla, Robert Talabis, Vic Varrion, Janine Frias, Lorna Tolentino, Phillip Salvador, Liza Anzures, Angge, Paquito Diaz, Max Alvarado, Lito Anzures; Executive producer: Fernando Poe Jr.; Original Music: Ernani Cuenco; Cinematography: Sergio Lobo; Film Editing: Augusto Salvador; Production Design: Pete Herrera; Sound: Angel Avellana, Jun Ella; Release Date:4 May 1974 (Philippines); Production Co: FPJ Productions – (IMDB)

Plot Description: “Batya’t Palu Palo,” is a situation comedy about a rich heiress, Estella (Vilma Santos), who disguises as a lowly washerwoman in order to find out for herself the true meaning of love that she found in Berting (Fernando Poe Jr).

Film Achievement: The success of this film resulted with a follow-up film, Bato sa Buhangin (1976), the OPM hit, used as the theme song or soundtrack of this 1974 Box Office Hit. Total Number of Fernando Poe Jr. and Vilma Santos Films: 5 – Batya’t Palu-Palo, Bato sa Buhangin, Ikaw ang Mahal Ko, Dugo At Pag-ibig sa Kapirasong Lupa, Mga Mata ni Angelita

Film Review: “…Recently, we spent an entire afternoon watching replays of three shows from Palibhasa Lalake and one from FPJ. Titled Batya’t Palo-palo, the FPJ film stars Fernando Poe Jr. with Vilma Santos as his leading lady. It presents a love story between Ronnie (Poe’s nickname) who plays a tubero working in the hacienda of the rich Saavedra family whose daughter (Vilma) he meets while she is cleaning her clothes by the river. The twist in the story comes when Ronnie mistakes Vilma for a laundry woman and she plays along, asking the women in the hacienda not to reveal her secret. Ronnie and Vilma begin to take a liking to each other while Vilma’s friends as well as Ronnie’s man Friday cooperate in keeping her secret. The parents of Vilma get wind of the situation, and are outraged that their daughter could fall for a man not in their class. Ronnie, who is unaware of all this secrecy, leaves the farm to board a bus for Manila. Vilma follows him to the station and while the bus is leaving, they get on board to their happy ending. We enjoyed this simple love story with only minimal fight scenes expected of a Ronnie Poe picture. Without question, there was definite magic in the Ronnie-Vilma team-up which kept us glued to the screen…Since these stories are re-runs of those produced many years ago, we can expect negative reactions from today’s young audience. We can already hear the words “unlikely storyline,” “ridiculous costuming” and “outdated locations.” We agree with all these accusations. However, to us such stories represent a period gone by, a part of our history that we should appreciate and be happy that some people took the pains to preserve…” – Bibsy M. Carballo, The Philippine Star, 11 March 2015 (READ MORE)

Two newly-proclaimed box office champions of Philippine movies star in FPJ Productions’ upcoming 13th anniversary presentations, “Batya’t Palu Palo,” a situation comedy about a rich heiress who disguises as a lowly washerwoman in order to find out for herself the true meaning of love. Dilineating the lead roles are Fernando Poe Jr. and Vilma Santos who star for the first time together. Now being filmed among the lush greens of Hacienda Luisita in Tarlac, “Batya’t Palu Palo” hopes to make people forget the humdrum activities of this world. A wholesome family entertainment, the flick will have Ronnie step down from his throne as the country’s number one action star to the down-to-earth role of Berting, a haceinda hand who nevertheless, catches the attention of the young rich and quiete spolied Estella. Directed by ace meg man Pablo Santiago, “Batya’t Palu Palo” is scripted by Fred Navarro, base on a story by Ronwaldo Reyes. – FPJ-Da King Blogspot (READ MORE)

“…Memories! I started reminiscing instantly. I want to ask Ate Susan (Roces, FPJ’s wife) nga for DVD copies of our three movies. I was only 21 when we made “Batya.” Ninety percent of the movie was shot in Hacienda Luisita (Tarlac) where we stayed for two months. He taught me how to swim in the hacienda’s swimming pool. We were with (co-star) Lorna Tolentino then. I admit that I didn’t know how to swim when I did “Dyesebel.” But the most memorable scene [from “Batya”] was the ending, where I ran after him, while he was aboard a train….” – RV (READ MORE)

“…Nang magkita sina Ronnie at Vilma sa first shooting day sa Montalban, Rizal, halos hindi mapatid ang batian, katiyawan at biruan. Pareho silang masayang-masaya. Sapagka’t at long last daw, natuloy din ang kanilang pagtatambal pagkalipas ng halos kulang sa isang taong paghihintay na ma-vacant si Vilma sa dami ng pelikulang ginawa. As sa simula ng siyuting, akala mo hindi sila magkakilala. Dibdiban ang acting at dialogue. Sunod-sunod ang take ng iba’t ibang angulo. Kalahating araw silang walang biruan at nang matapos ang maraming eksena ay saka lamang sila muling nagtawanan. “Mahirap na,” sabi ni Vi, “Kailangang makarami ng scenes para naman makabawi sa akin ang FPJ. Biruin naman ninyong ang tagal din ang ipinaghintay nila sa akin. Nagpapasalamat ako sa napakahabang patience nila. Kung tulad ng iba, baka pinalitan na lamang ako ng ibang leading lady. Masyado silang professional sa pakikipag-deal, lalo na si Ronnie kaya nahihiya man ako sa atraso, hindi naman makapag-back out doon sa mga naka-schedule ko na. Dapat na tapusain ko rin para walang magalit na producer sa akin…” Letty G. Celi (READ MORE)

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#BatyatPaloPalo, #FPJ, #FernandoPoeJr, #VilmaSantos

Filmography: Vivian Volta (1974)

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Basic Information: Direction Bobby Santiago; Story and Screenplay Antonio Pascua; Cast: Vilma Santos (in the title role), Edgar Mortiz, Eddie Garcia, Paquito Diaz, Romy Diaz, Leopoldo Salcedo, Leonor Vergara, Darius Razon and Cristina Reyes; Cinematography: Alfonso Alvarez; Music: D’Amarillo; Production Company: GPS Productions; Release Date: 12 October 1974 – Andrew Leavold (READ MORE)

Plot Description: Martial arts Vilma fights bad guys as Vivian Volta.

Film Achievement: Box office hit of 1974

Film Review: “…There was a time in the 70s, particularly in 1973 and 1974, when a spate of Pinoy fantasy films featuring Pinoy superheroes graced our big screens. I think it was Vilma Santos’ Lipad Darna Lipad that started it all. It ushered in this wave of so-called trend in fantasy movies. Besides Darna, Vilma came up with Wonder Vi (1973), Phantom Lady (1974) and Vivian Volta (1974); Nora Aunor had Super Gee (1973) based on a popular komik serial; Superman and Batman had their local counterparts in Zoom, Zoom Superman (1973) with Ariel Ureta and Fight Batman Fight with Victor Wood. Vilma came out with another sequel of Darna titled Darna and the Giants, also in 1973; Dolphy had his own version of Captain Barbell in Captain Barbell Boom (1973). It was the movie, Supergirl (1973) which starred Pinky, that made a major impact among the moviegoers that time. It was a surprise hit that year. It was reshown several times due to insistent public demand…” – Simon Santos (READ MORE)

Mad Scientist vs Volta – “…Eddie Garcia is a mad scientist who plans to destroy the world, and comebacking star Leonor Vergara is his wife in GPS Production’s Quezon City Film Fest entry “Volta” in full color. It stars Vilma Santos and Edgar Mortiz under the direction of Bobby Santiago…”

Fight Scene – “…In 1974, our house became a setting of GPS Productions’ “Vivian Volta.” Vilma Santos shot one scene, a fight scene…Edgar Mortiz , who was also in the movie, accompanied Vi to the set. I read in some gossip column that Vilma and Edgar that time had already problem with their relationship. Basketball star Dave Brodett, who was rumored to be courting Vilma, paid the young actress a visit at the set. Several scenes were also shot the following day, with veteran actor Eddie Garcia, playing a mad scientist and comebacking actress Leonor Vergara, who played his wife…” – Posted by Simon Santos, Video 48, 21 September 2017 (READ MORE)

Filmography: Takbo, Vilma, Dali (1972)

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Basic Information: Direction, screenplay: Joey Gosiengfiao; Cast: Vilma Santos, Rita Gomez, Paquito Diaz, Max Alvarado, Romeo Rivera, Ernie Garcia; Executive producer: Douglas Quijano

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: Joey Gosiengfiao films with Vilma Santos: Hatinggabi Na Vilma 1972; Takbo, Vilma, Dali 1972; Lipad, Darna, Lipad 1973; Promo Girl 1978 – RV (READ MORE)

Film Review: A very effective suspense-thriller. There are images here that haunt you even long after the screening – like the sight of the old Mother Superior (Mary Walter) being tortured and pushed around before she is finally killed. – Butch Francisco (READ MORE)

“…Joey Gosiengfiao’s films are anything but righteous, much less respectable. That was their glory and greatness, and the reason he could never win an award–Christ, I think, with his abhorrence of respectability, would like the man’s style. Take, for example, the scene between Eddie Gutierrez and Ricky Belmonte in Bomba Star (roughly translated, Porn Star, 1980). Belmonte and Gutierrez are working out in a gym; Gutierrez starts casting looks at Belmonte; Belmonte coyly returns his looks. The two start teasing each other, tickling each other, suddenly find themselves on the floor wrestling with each other…enter Gutierrez’s lover, played by Marissa Delgado–she doesn’t do anything, just strikes a glamour pose, a sardonic expression on her face and the world’s longest cigarette holder between her fingers. I wish I could explain why the moment is so irreducibly funny, but I can’t; if I could, I suspect it wouldn’t be funny at all…” – Noel Vera (READ MORE)

“…Noon namang kainitan ng Vilma-Nora rivalry…Marso 23, 1973, ay ipinalabas ang higanteng trilogy movie ng Sine Pilipino na “Lipad, Darna, Lipad.” Ang pelikulang ito na tinatampukan din nina Angelito bilang si Ding, Gloria Romero bilang Babaing Impakta, Liza Lorena bilang Babaing Lawin at Celia Rodriguez bilang Valentina, ang Babaing Ahas ang sumira ng takilya nang mga panahong yun kaya’t nabigyan din siya dito na Box Office Queen title. Hindi lang sa takilya ito tumiba ng husto dahil nang ipalabas ito sa telebisyon makaraan lamang ang ilang buwan ay naging numero uno din ito sa telebisyon lalo na sa mga bata. Di nga ba’t tinalo nito ang pelikula ni FPJ na may pamagat na “Esteban” na kasabay nitong ipinalabas? At makaraan naman ang isang linggo, nang ipalabas naman ang pelikula nina Joseph Estrada at Nora Aunor na may pamagat na “Erap Is My Guy” ay tinalong muli ng “Lipad Darna Lipad” ang nasabing pelikula nina Erap at Guy. Tumagal din sa mga sinehan ito ng mahigit na isang buwan. Talagang naaliw ang mga manonood lalo na noong lumilipad si Darna sa himpapawid habang ang background music ay Up Up and Away. Ang “Lipad, Darna, Lipad” ay idinerek nina Emmanuel Borlaza, Elwood Perez at Joey Gosiengfiao. Ang dalawang pelikulang produced pa din ng Sine Pilipino at sabi nga ni Rita Gomez, ito ang iyong huling sigaw…”Takbo, Vilma, Dali” ay ipinalabas noong Septyembre 29, 1972 at ang kahindik-hindik na pagtutuos ni Vi at Barbara Perez sa “Hatinggabi na, Vilma” ay ipinalabas noong Nobyembre 8, 1972 ay halos ganun din ang dinanas sa takilya katulad ng “Lipad Darna Lipad”…” – Alfonso Valencia (READ MORE)

“…Talagang poor second lang noon si Vilma kay Nora Aunor, subali’t nang gawin niya ang trilogy film ng Sine Pilipino na Lipad Darna Lipad ay talagang lumipad ng husto ang kanyang box office appeal. Sinundan pa ito ng mga pelikulang Takbo Vilma Dali at Hatinggabi Na Vilma. Anupa’t itinambal din si Vilma sa mga matured leading man na katulad nina Eddie Rodriguez sa mga pelikulang Nakakahiya, Hindi Nakakahiya Part 2 kung saan nagkamit siya ng Best Actress Award sa 1st Bacolod City Film Festival at Simula Ng Walang Katapusan, Dante Rivero sa Susan Kelly Edad 20, Chiquito sa Teribol Dobol, Dolphy sa Buhay Artista Ngayon, Joseph Estrada sa King Khayan & I, Fernando Poe Jr. sa Batya’t Palu Palo at Bato Sa Buhangin, Jun Aristorenas sa Mapagbigay Ang Mister Ko, Dindo Fernando sa Langis at Tubig at Muling Buksan Ang Puso at Romeo Vasquez sa Nag-aapoy Na Damdamin, Dalawang Pugad Isang Ibon, Pulot Gata Pwede Kaya at Pag-ibig Ko Sa ‘Yo Lang Ibibigay…” – Alfonso Valencia (READ MORE)

“…The following year, Santos made fourteen films, mostly forgettable musicals. It was also a year where her benefactor started to positioned her as more of a film actress than a singing film star. The results was successful experiments that showcased her comedic ability (Ang Kundoktora), screaming action stunts (Takbo Vilma Dali) and dramatic capability (Dama De Noche). Her followers was delighted when she earned her first acting recognition the next year receiving the FAMAS best actress via Dama De Noche. Most of her films in 1972 were directed by Emmanuel Borlaza however, she was able to do one film with Ishmael Bernal, “Inspiration” with the late Jay Ilagan, one of her regular film partner. According to Bernal, the film wasn’t as successful as what he expected, as the film flopped. Aside from Inspiration, Bernal did two other films, El Vibora (starring Vic Vargas and Boots Anson Roa) and Till Death Do Us Part (starring the young Hilda Koronel and Victor Laurel)…” – RV (READ MORE)

“…Joey re-emerged in the movie scene in 1972, bristling with fresh ideas. This time he made a big gamble by helping his brother Victor and some friends put up Sine Pilipino, the company that would revolutionize trends in local movie-making. SP specializes in campy, stylish movies with imperative, three-word titles: Takbo, Vilma, Dali; Hatinggabi na, Vilma; Zoom, Zoom Superman!l; Si Popeye Atbp.; and Sunugin Ang Samar. Except for the last mentioned which was an action saga, the four SP flicks were spoofs characterized by madness. They revived the all-star casting system, lumping together in one movie several big stars. The flicks made money. Joey Gosiengfiao had his “sweet revenge.” “It was not wasy for us in the beginning,” Joey relates. “Just before the showing of our first film, Takbo, Vilma Dali!, Martial Law was declared. There were no newspapers then so we had to post bills all over the city, hanggang Pasay nagdidikit kami nina Douglas. We also distributed hand bills. Sa awa ng Diyos, kumita ang pelikula.” Of the films he has done, Joey considers Sunugin Ang Samar as the most difficult, not only because of its scope but also because action is not his forte. It took him three months to make the movie because the script (by Wilfrido Nolledo) called for different settings and they had to move from one place to another. Joey didn’t exactly follow Nolledo’s script but he saw to it that “the spirit was retained.” Of late, Joey has organized his own company called Juan de la Cruz Productions together with Elwood and Douglas. Their inital production, Asawa Mo, Asawa KO, was a moneymaker. SP specializes in home-movie types while JC makes more of the woman’s movie, “that’s because we are not good for action pictures.” Joey is now connected with SP only as a director…” – Expressweek, December 12 1974 (READ MORE)

“…For the last seven years the name Joey Gosiengfiao has streaked like a dazzling comet across the movie firmament after Bomba Star, Babae!, Piknik and Takbo Vilma Dali! became blockbusters one after the other. Significantly, not all the four Gosiengfiao flicks were sexplosives, a category which today, seems to be the main requisite for box office acceptance. Takbo Vilma Dali! was s suspense thriller that easily catered to all ages and to the average Filipino family…” – Manny B. Fernandez, Expressweek, March 1, 1979 (READ MORE)

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Filmography: De Colores (1968)

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Basic Information: Directed: Armando Garces; Story: Romeo N. Galang; Screenplay: Romeo N. Galang; Cast: Joseph Estrada, Amalia Fuentes, Leopoldo Salcedo, Gloria Romero, Jun Aristorenas, Divina Valencia, Mario Montenegro, Perla Bautista, Anna Gonzales, Eddie Garcia, Mila Ocampo, Paquito Diaz, Von Serna, Eddie Infante, Gil de Leon, Jose De Villa, Jose Vergara, Luis Castro, Vilma Santos; Executive producer: Rey Ylag; Original Music: Restie Umali; Cinematography: Fortunato Bernardo

Plot Description: No Available Data

Film Achievement: 1968 FAMAS Best Actor – Eddie Garcia; 1968 FAMAS Nomination Best Actress – Perla Bautista; 1968 FAMAS Nomination Best Director – Armando Garces; 1968 FAMAS Nomination Best Picture

Film Review: “…Ipinanganak nga marahil si Ma. Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos sa show business dahil sa pagitan ng taping ng “Larawan..” ay nagkasunod-sunod na ang kanyang mga pelikula…“De Colores” ng Arco-Iris (Marso 30 – April 10, 1968)…hanggang “Young Love” ng VP Enero 1 – 21, 1970) ng lumikha ng rekord sa takilya….Makalipas ang mga tatlong buwan, nakatanggap ng maikling sulat si Mama Santos muka lay G. Agra. Naghahanap ang Sampaguita Picutures ng batang babae na gaganap ng mahalagang papel sa “Anak, Ang Iyong Ina!” at isinali ng amain ang pangalan ni Vi. Hindi puwedeng lumiban si Papa Santos sa pinpasukang government office, at ayaw naman nilang mapahiya ang kamag-anak, kaya napilitan si Mama Santos na humingi ng day=off sa opisina (Aguinaldo’s). Pagdating sa studio, wala si G. Agra at nasa location shooting, ngunit totoong naroroon ang pangalan ni Vi, kaya’t pinapasok sila sa tanggapan. Napadaan sa harapan ni Mama Santos si Bella Flores na dala ang script ng “Trudis Liit.” Nagulumihanan si Mama Santos. Binasa niyang muli ang liham ni G. Agra. Mali yata ang napuntahan nila! Akma niyang tatawagin si Vi na noon ay nkikipaglaro sa iba pang mga bata upang yayain na itong umuwi, nang pumasok sina Mommy Vera, Dr. at Mrs. Perez, at Eddie Garcia. At doon nagsimula ang movie career ni Vi na magpahanggang ngayon ay batbat pa rin ng iba’t ibang panunuri, opinyon at konklusiyon…” – Ched P. Gonzales (READ MORE)

“…An all-star cast flick with such superstars as Joseph Estrada, Amalia Fuentes, and Gloria Romero. Despite multiple episodic stories of this movie about the “cult” “religious” revival among the elite Catholics, Vilma was in a forgettable episode. I wasn’t sure if she played a rebellious daughter turned good via the Cursillo, and whether she shared scenes with Ms. Romero. What mattered was that she bumped into her Tita Gloria on the set. More bonding, please…” – Mario O. Garces (READ MORE)

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Filmography: Batang Iwahig (1966)

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Basic Information: Directed: Pablo Santiago; Screenplay: Ding M. De Jesus; Cast: Joseph Estrada, Paquito Diaz, Diana Dean, Bessie Barredo, Boy Francisco, Jose Vergara, Vilma Santos, Miguel Lopez, Avel Morado, Joaquin Fajardo, Manding Riño, Ponching Tambol, Leo Buenafe, Robert Rivera, Fil Lizarondo, Mike Francisco; Film poster: Video48

Plot Description: Iwahig Penal Colony is already a good haven for prisoners. Edgardo Alvarez (Joseph Estrada) was transferred to this place prior to his release. A hundred thousand pesos was the reason why he was detained. He, together w/ the group of Brando (Paquito Diaz) robbed the said amount and Edgar kept the same amount by burying it in a certain place before he was arrested by the police. Brando tortured him and his family even while he’s in prison because of the said money only to find out that they just fought for nothing. – Kabayan Central (READ MORE)

Film Achievement: No Available Data

Film Review: “…Joseph Estrada was at his best appearing in ‘tough guy’ roles after striking it big as “Asiong Salonga” in 1961. He was rough and mean in movies like North Harbor (1961), Pulong Diablo (1963), Basagulero (1963); Geron Busabos: Ang Batang Quiapo (1964); Batang Angustia (1965); Batang Iwahig (1966) and many more where he essayed the role of a ‘kanto boy.’ However in the 70s and 80s, Estrada chose to do light-comedy films (remember the Tatay na si Erap series, Erap is my Guy, Mamang Sorbetero, among others) and more of a Dirty Harry type of movies, where he portrayed a determined and dedicated law enforcer. He did quite a number of these movies starting with Kill the Pushers in 1972 and so on with Panic (1973), Ranson (1974), among others…” – Simon Santos (READ MORE)

“…Ipinanganak nga marahil si Ma. Rosa Vilma Tuazon Santos sa show business dahil sa pagitan ng taping ng “Larawan..” ay nagkasunod-sunod na ang kanyang mga pelikula…“Batang Iwahig” ng LSP (Oktubre 21 – 28, 1966)…hanggang “Young Love” ng VP Enero 1 – 21, 1970) ng lumikha ng rekord sa takilya….Makalipas ang mga tatlong buwan, nakatanggap ng maikling sulat si Mama Santos muka lay G. Agra. Naghahanap ang Sampaguita Picutures ng batang babae na gaganap ng mahalagang papel sa “Anak, Ang Iyong Ina!” at isinali ng amain ang pangalan ni Vi. Hindi puwedeng lumiban si Papa Santos sa pinpasukang government office, at ayaw naman nilang mapahiya ang kamag-anak, kaya napilitan si Mama Santos na humingi ng day=off sa opisina (Aguinaldo’s). Pagdating sa studio, wala si G. Agra at nasa location shooting, ngunit totoong naroroon ang pangalan ni Vi, kaya’t pinapasok sila sa tanggapan. Napadaan sa harapan ni Mama Santos si Bella Flores na dala ang script ng “Trudis Liit.” Nagulumihanan si Mama Santos. Binasa niyang muli ang liham ni G. Agra. Mali yata ang napuntahan nila! Akma niyang tatawagin si Vi na noon ay nkikipaglaro sa iba pang mga bata upang yayain na itong umuwi, nang pumasok sina Mommy Vera, Dr. at Mrs. Perez, at Eddie Garcia. At doon nagsimula ang movie career ni Vi na magpahanggang ngayon ay batbat pa rin ng iba’t ibang panunuri, opinyon at konklusiyon…” – Ched P. Gonzales (READ MORE)

“…Edgardo (Joseph Estrada) is a safecracker. To help care of his blind sister Vina (Vilma Santos), he takes care a life of crime. Edgardo hooks up with Brando (Paquito Diaz) to steal a hundred thousand pesos from Don Joaquin. But the robbery goes wrong and Edgardo ends up in jail. But not before burying the money in a safe place. Several years later, Edgardo is pardoned and he swears to remain on the straight and narrow. But Brando and his cohorts would not let him. They have waited all these years for their share of the loot and they are not about to just let Edgardo go. What if Brando uses Vina to ensure Edgardo’s cooperation? Can Edgardo afford to risk his sister’s life?…” – Mav Shack (READ MORE)