Remembering Dolphy 1/2

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Curtains down “…Dolphy, or Rodolfo Quizon Sr., passed away Tuesday at 8:34 p.m., at the Makati Medical Center (MMC), thus ending one of the longest and most colorful lives and careers in Philippine show business history. He was 83 and about to turn 84 on July 25. Eric Quizon, one of Dolphy’s sons, gave the following statement to the news media at the MMC at about midnight: “He lived a full life. He’s at rest. He’s at peace. He knew as he was going how much the country loved him. He knew how everyone was praying for him. And if he could, he would have stayed just so he could thank you personally. But where his spirit was strong, his body had so weakened. He had to go. “Pray for his eternal repose and in his honor, please smile at the person standing next to you. Heaven is a happier place with him there. And for us whom he’s left behind, comedy is dead but long live comedy,” Eric added. Dolphy starred in over 100 movies, including several reprising his lovable lead character in John en Marsha, a popular, long-running television show. He is survived by 18 children by six different women….” – GMA News (READ MORE)

Order of the Golden Heart “…According to Malacañang, the Order of the Golden Heart was set up in 1954 by the late President Ramon Magsaysay to recognize individuals who have rendered distinguished service or given material aid to improve the condition of the masses. After the ceremony, Dolphy elicited laughter again when his family was called to be photographed with the President. As some of his children like Zia (his child with Padilla), actors Van Dolph (with former partner, actress Alma Moreno) and Rolly and Epi Quizon joined him onstage, Dolphy told the audience that he had many children, including seven based in the United States and one in Australia…Dolphy told reporters he could ask for nothing more. Of Mr. Aquino, he said: “I didn’t realize till now that our President was such a good man. I threw stones at him last election; now he gave me bread? this award, for which I will always be thankful.?…” – Christine O. Avendaño (READ MORE)

The Father “…Like any father, I have but one desire: to see to it that my family is fully satisfied. I always feel extremely happy when all my children typify the healthy and spirited youth. I’m proud to say that I’ve no problems with my five boys and lone daughter. They lead a normal life like most anybody, in spite of my being celebrity.” Dolphy mused…” – Nap AlipFoto Play, March 1969 (READ MORE)

Kung down na, huwag mo nang sipain – “…Hindi ako nakikialam sa pulitika. Kay Cory ka o loyalist ka, pareho sa akin. Mabut may freedom of speech na ngayon. Meron nga ba?,” he shoots back but answers himself. “Sa palagay ko talagang meron. Nakakatuwa yung si Hadji Alejandro at Florante, nakita ko minsan sa TV kumakanta…”…In this warm and genteel manner, Dolphy in all candor tell us how it saddens him that people who wield tremedous press power will go to gross entents just to malign, insult and shame…we countered that probably the mean crowd was a paid one and that they were there so that there would be a story to print. Maybe the headlines and the front page as it eventually did. “Bakit naman ganoon,” Dolphy said in grief and disdain. “Eh kasal naman noong tao. Naiinis lang ako ng ganoon. Kung down na, huwag mo nang sipain. Down na e. Hindi matgil ang pagjujuntahan tungkol sa artista maski sa programa sa TV, hindi naman isusulat pirmi yung kabutihan e di ba?” “huwag kang magagalit ha,” he takes a care not to be rude and continues, “pero mas masarap isulat yung baho. Wala namang hahanapan ng baho kung di artista lnag. Parang ganoon na ang silipan, hindi ba?” We claim that there has not been anything harmful said about him lately, that he is still respected. “Kung tungkol sa akin,” he comments disinterestedly, “tinatanog ko muna kung mabuti o masama. Kung masama hindi ko na binabasa. Sisirain ko yung araw ko.” Wala naman sinulat na masama pa, tungkol sa iyo,” we insists. “Anong wala,” he answers calmly without changing his mild voice tone, “ang dami dami na. Ngayon na lang siguro kaunti dahil wala na silang maisulat. Wala nang makitang hanggang sa pinatay na nga ako hindi ba?…” – Ada Dacay de leon, Weekend June 22 1986 (READ MORE)

John en Marsha “…In 1952, Dolphy met producer Dr. Jose “Doc” Perez of Sampaguita Pictures upon the recommendation of actor Pancho Magalona, father of the late rapper Francis Magalona. Dolphy said his first movie was Sa Isang Sulyap Mo, Tita, with Pancho Magalona and Tita Duran in 1953. Since then, Dolphy made more than 230 movies, including films based on komiks characters like Jack and Jill, Silveria, Captain Barbell, and Facifica Falayfay. “When I joined Sampaguita, my fee was P1,000 per movie. When my contract expired, P7,000 per picture na ako,” he said. He said he started on TV in the 1960s upon the invitation of ABS-CBN big boss Eugenio “Geny” Lopez, Sr. His first TV show was Buhay Artista, based on an idea of Mr. Lopez. “Sa radio, my talent fee was P250-P300 per program. On TV, my talent fee was a little bit higher, P500 per show,” he said. But his biggest TV program was John en Marsha, a sitcom that featured him and actress Nida Blanca as husband and wife. The show ran for 17 years until 1990, and spawned eight movie versions. “Ang success ng John en Marsha sa TV nag-translate sa big screen. I think ito lang ang local TV show na naisalin sa pelikula ng pinakamaraming beses. [The success of John en Marsha translated to the big screen. I think, this is the only local TV show that has been made into movie the most number of times],” he said. Dolphy admits that whenever he remembers John en Marsha, he can not help but feel sad about the death of Ms. Blanca, who was murdered nine years ago. The case remains unresolved. “As movie partners, we were a match made in heaven,” Dolphy said. “Magaling siya. Mayro’n kaming chemistry. Kung ano ang kaya ko, kaya niya, and vice-versa. OK kami sa comedy, sa musicals, sa drama. [She was excellent. We had chemistry. What I could do, she could also do, and vice-versa. We were OK in doing comedy, musicals, and drama].” “When she died, I felt bad. She does not deserve that kind of death,” he added….” – Jeffrey O. Valisno (READ MORE)

A Thesis “…While Dolphy’s iconic popularity has largely been appended to the roles or characterizations he has played over the years, and has been mainly, if not stereotypically, attributed to his personal exploits, this paper explores how this comic image, superimposed on the media hype that surrounds Dolphy’s own colorful life, moves beyond his career’s longevity or the controversies therein. Dolphy’s long and significant comic history in Philippine cinema has become a virtual template of what succeeds by way of the comic in Philippine popular visual media. While the predictability of his comedy petrifies him and ultimately limits the possible transformative value of his comedy, and while his reign as “king of Philippine comedy” is an appellation that may have begun as media hype, Dolphy can still be rightly valorized as “king” for the moment, for opening comic spaces for transgression/aggression in Philippine life…” – Maria Rhodora G. Ancheta (READ MORE)

Rodolfo Vera Quizon, Sr. (born July 25, 1928), known by his screen name Dolphy, is a Filipino comedian-actor in the Philippines. He is widely regarded as the country’s “King of Comedy” for his comedic talent embodied by his long roster of works on stage, radio, television and movies…In November 2010, President Benigno Aquino III conferred the Grand Collar of the Order of the Golden Heart to Dolphy – the highest award given to a private citizen by the President of the Philippines – for his contributions to the entertainment industry and for his charitable and philanthropic works. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

Dolphy and Vilma Santos

“…Batangas Governor Vilma Santos, who’s now identified with ABS-CBN, told the Inquirer: “The whole country is saddened by the news. He was simple but someone with a big heart for Filipinos. He entertained us for over 60 years.” The actress-politician recalled that she first shared the screen with Dolphy when she was a child star. “I worked with him and the late comedians Panchito and Chichay when I was 11 years old in the Sampaguita movie ‘King and Queen for a Day.’ That was 1963…” – Bayani San Diego Jr, Philippine Daily Inquirer, Jul 12 2012 (READ MORE)

Messages from Tito Dolfs – “…Pero even that time, tuwing gumagawa ako ng special for Vilma, nu’ng araw, lagi akong may nakukuhang message from Tito Dolfs. So ‘yun ang mga encounter ko kay Tito Dolfs,” bungad ni Gov. Vilma sa alaala niya sa Comedy King. “Kasi si Tito Dolfs… Lahat ng kagandahan, lahat ng puwede nating masabing pagpuri kay Tito Dolfs ay… Ako, papatunayan ko rin. Nakasama ko siya ng dalawang beses. Totoo lahat ‘yon! Even the time that we were together, si Tito Dolfs, talagang ano eh. Malayo sa personal. Tahimik siya sa personal eh. One li­ner. ‘Yung akala mo, walang kibo. ‘Pag bibitiw ng sa­lita, talagang tatawa ka! Hindi siya ‘yung maingay na klase porke sasabihin mong komedyante na maingay, hindi eh. Ang layo eh! “He’s a quiet person. Deep. Pero minsan, ‘pag magkukuwentuhan kayo, biglang sisingit ‘yon. One liner lang, pero tatawa kayong lahat…” – Jun Nardo (READ MORE)

Dolphy and Vilma Santos did four films together. The first one was in her first year in show biz and in a Dolphy-Chichay film. After six years, the two reunited in one of early films of Nida Blanca and Dolphy. The film was sort of about family planning and birth control. Vi was in minor role and one of the child actors featured in the film. They followed this up with minor roles in the Cirio Santiago’s all-star-cast film. By later part of 1970s, both Dolphy and Vilma became a regular staples in award shows receiving several trophies as box office king and queen. Finally, after almost a decade from their last outings and no longer his film daughter, Dolphy and Vilma did their last film (to this day), this time, Vilma played the leading lady, in a film, ironically, about show business. Also, that year, Doply became the only male actor who portrayed Darna, the female comic-super-heroine in Darna Kuno. Not to be undone, Vilma will reprise the role the following year in her fourth and final film as Darna in Darna at Ding. At present time, both superstars made headlines as contenders for Philippines’ National Artists honors. Vilma respectfully and publicly asked for Dolphy to confer the title ahead of her. – RV

King and Queen for a Day (1963) – “…Pangkaraniwang papel niya ang Everyman na mula sa karalitaan ay humahantong sa tagumpay – at lover boy pa, tulad sa mga sumusunod na pelikula: “King And Queen For A Day” (1963), “Rodolfo Valentino” at “Tayo’y Mag-Up Up And Away” (1970). Matagal siyang nakakontrata sa Sampaguita, pero nang magsara ang pangunahing movie company ay gumawa si Dolphy sa iba’t bang studio, tulad ng Lea Productions at Regal Films, at sa sariling RVQ Productions…” – Mario A. Hernando (READ MORE)

Pag-ibig masdan ang ginawa mo (1968) – “…Here’s the picture with the secret formula for birth control…”Pag-ibig Masdan Ang Ginawa Mo (September 7, 1969) ng RVQ Productions ang pinangunahan nina Vi, Dolphy, Nida Blanca, Panchito, Myrna Delgado, Katy de la Cruz, Bayani Casimiro, Rolly Quizon, Georgie Quizon at Teroy de Guzman. Ito ay sa iskrip at direksiyon ni Luciano B. Carlos at istorya ni Dan Quizon…” – Alfonso Valencia (READ MORE)

Happy Days Are Here Again (1974) – “…In 1974, the Big 3 studios of the 50s, LVN Pictures, Sampaguita Pictures and Premiere Productions reproduced a full-length movie showcasing a compilation of the musical comedies produced by the three studios. It was a painstaking job for the researchers since most of the best musicals produced by the three studios were either lost or destroyed. At the start of the project, director Lamberto V. Avellana was supposed to direct the film but eventually replaced by Ciro Santiago after so many changes in the project including the script. He ended up as consultant of the movie. The film was HAPPY DAYS ARE HERE AGAIN, with brief narrations by movie stars like Gloria Romero, Nida Blanca, Susan Roces, Leopoldo Salcedo, Jaime de la Rosa, Eddie Gutierrez, Tirso Cruz III, Pugo, German Moreno and Ike Lozada…” – Pelikula Atbp (READ MORE)

Buhay Artista Ngayon (1979) – “…Talagang poor second lang noon si Vilma kay Nora Aunor, subali’t nang gawin niya ang trilogy film ng Sine Pilipino na Lipad Darna Lipad ay talagang lumipad ng husto ang kanyang box office appeal. Sinundan pa ito ng mga pelikulang Takbo Vilma Dali at Hatinggabi Na Vilma. Anupa’t itinambal din si Vilma sa mga matured leading man na katulad nina Eddie Rodriguez sa mga pelikulang Nakakahiya, Hindi Nakakahiya Part 2 kung saan nagkamit siya ng Best Actress Award sa 1st Bacolod City Film Festival at Simula Ng Walang Katapusan, Dante Rivero sa Susan Kelly Edad 20, Chiquito sa Teribol Dobol, Dolphy sa Buhay Artista Ngayon, Joseph Estrada sa King Khayan & I, Fernando Poe Jr. sa Batya’t Palu Palo at Bato Sa Buhangin, Jun Aristorenas sa Mapagbigay Ang Mister Ko, Dindo Fernando sa Langis at Tubig at Muling Buksan Ang Puso at Romeo Vasquez sa Nag-aapoy Na Damdamin, Dalawang Pugad Isang Ibon, Pulot Gata Pwede Kaya at Pag-ibig Ko Sa ‘Yo Lang Ibibigay…” – Alfonso Valencia (READ MORE)

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