In Memoriam

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Dolphy – Rodolfo Vera Quizon, Sr., OGH (July 25, 1928 – July 10, 2012), known by his screen names Dolphy, Pidol, and Golay (1944), was a Filipino comedian-actor in the Philippines. He is widely regarded as the country’s “King of Comedy” for his comedic talent embodied by his long roster of works on stage, radio, television and movies. Dolphy was born on July 25, 1928 in Calle Padre Herrera (now P. Herrera St.) of Tondo, Manila. His father was Melencio E. Quizon, a ship engine worker in the Atlantic Gulf and Pacific Company of Manila, and the son of Modesto Quizon and Adorable Quizon (née Espinosa). His mother was Salud V. Quizon (née Vera), the daughter of Maximo Vera and Ninay Vera (née de la Rosa). He was the second eldest of ten children. Dolphy sold peanuts and watermelon seeds at movie theaters as a boy, which enabled him to watch movies for free. He was about thirteen when World War II started. He did odd jobs including shining shoes; attaching buttons at a pants factory; sorting bottles by size; working as a stevedore at the pier; trading; and driving calesas. In his free time he regularly watched stage shows at the Life Theater and the Avenue Theater. His favorite performers included the comedy duo Pugo and Togo, and the dancers Benny Mack and Bayani Casimiro. He started performing onstage during the Japanese occupation of the Philippines. Dolphy was turning 17 when Benny Mack got him a job as a chorus dancer for a month at the Avenue Theater and subsequently on the Lyric Theater. He also appeared in shows at the Orient Theater. Golay was his first stage name. During air raids, they would interrupt the show and run for the air-raid shelter in the orchestra section together with the audience. If no bombs exploded, the show resumed…Dolphy died on July 10, 2012, 20:34 (Philippine time, 01:34 UTC), at the age of 83 due to multiple organ failure, secondary to complications brought about by pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and acute renal failure. President Benigno Aquino III declared July 13, 2012 as “National Day of Remembrance” in honor of Dolphy’s contributions to the Philippine showbiz industry. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

“…Dolphy and Vilma Santos did four films together. The first one was in her first year in show biz and in a Dolphy-Chichay film. After six years, the two reunited in one of early films of Nida Blanca and Dolphy. The film was sort of about family planning and birth control. Vi was in minor role and one of the child actors featured in the film. They followed this up with minor roles in the Cirio Santiago’s all-star-cast film. By later part of 1970s, both Dolphy and Vilma became a regular staples in award shows receiving several trophies as box office king and queen. Finally, after almost a decade from their last outings and no longer his film daughter, Dolphy and Vilma did their last film (to this day), this time, Vilma played the leading lady, in a film, ironically, about show business. Also, that year, Doply became the only male actor who portrayed Darna, the female comic-super-heroine in Darna Kuno. Not to be undone, Vilma will reprise the role the following year in her fourth and final film as Darna in Darna at Ding. At present time, both superstars made headlines as contenders for Philippines’ National Artists honors. Vilma respectfully and publicly asked for Dolphy to confer the title ahead of her…” – RV (READ MORE)

Mario O’Hara (Director, Writer (Rubia Servios) – Mario Herrero O’Hara (born April 20, 1946 – died 26 June 2012) was an award-winning Filipino film director, film producer and screenwriter known for his sense of realism often with dark but realistic social messages. He was born in Zamboanga City on April 20, 1946. His mother was Basilisa Herrero, who has Spanish lineage and hails from Ozamis Oriental. His father Jaime O’Hara was the son of Irish-American Thomasite; Jaime was a member of the UP Dramatic club. Mario had eight brothers and three sisters. Because Jaime was the son of an American citizen, Mario’s family was eligible to apply for US citizenship; however, Mario rejected any such offers…He was born in Zamboanga City on April 20, 1946. His mother was Basilisa Herrero, who has Spanish lineage and hails from Ozamis Oriental. His father Jaime O’Hara was the son of Irish-American Thomasite; Jaime was a member of the UP Dramatic club. Mario had eight brothers and three sisters. Because Jaime was the son of an American citizen, Mario’s family was eligible to apply for US citizenship; however, Mario rejected any such offers. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

“…In 1978, he wrote the screenplay for Lino Brocka’s Rubia Servos. This led to the first award in his film career (Best Screenplay at the Metro Manila Film Festival)…” – Wikipedia

Marilou Diaz-Abaya is a multi-awarded film director in the Philippines. She is the founder and current president of the Marilou Diaz Abaya Film Institute and Arts Center, a film school based in Antipolo City, Philippines. She is the director of José Rizal, a biopicture on the Philippines’ national hero…Diaz directed and released her first feature film, Tanikala (Chains) in 1980. Since then, she has been one of the most active and visible directors in Philippine cinema…Her early films Brutal, Karnal (Of the Flesh), and Alyas Baby Tsina, sharply condemn the oppressive social system during the administration of Philippine President Ferdinand Marcos. When the Marcos was deposed in 1986, Diaz left filmmaking. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

“…Batangas Governor Vilma Santos, who was directed by Diaz-Abaya in one of her landmark films, said, “Direk Marilou was like a mother to me, especially on the set of ‘Baby Tsina.’ I remember that she would always bring for the cast members pandesal and Spanish sardines, which we ate before shooting. “I love her and her husband, Direk Manolo, who I always requested to be my cinematographer in all of my Eskinol commercials before. “The last time I saw Direk Marilou was at the wake of actor Johnny Delgado. She was already sick then. She was a fighter. She told me, “kaya ko ‘to! I pray for her family and for the eternal repose of her soul…” – Philippine Daily Inquirer, Oct 09 2012 (READ MORE)

Celso Ad. Castillo began directing films mid-60′s at an early age, but he has since then gained reputation for many other aspects of the craft particularly scriptwriting and acting. In the Filipino movie industry, he holds the unique repuation of being controversial, trendsetter,enfant terrible and messiah of Philippine cinema, and his track record justifies it: he introduced artistry and commercialism in sex films (nympha) when the two were considered incompatible, and introduced sex in artistic projects ( Ang Pinakamagandang Hayop sa Balat ng Lupa/The Most Beautiful Animal on Earth)when moralistic repression was in vogue. An unfortunate and unfair consequence of the controversy is the recognition due him as one of the finest film commentators on the Philippine social scene, with a visual fluency unmatched by any other contemporary filipino film director. – Celso Ad Castillo Web-site (READ MORE)

“…Castillo gave Vilma Santos her first mature role in Burlesk Queen resulting with her first local film festival best actress award. He also directed Pagputi Ng Uwak Pagitim Ng Tagak where Vilma Santos starred and produced. The film received several best picture awards and was considered one of Castillo’s best works…” – RV (READ MORE)

Luís Mercado (August 8, 1928 – March 15, 2012) also known as Luís Gonzales, is a Filipino actor who appeared in more than 100 films during his career, most of them by Sampaguita Pictures. Raised in Tondo, Manila, Gonzales may be best known for his portrayals of former President Ferdinand Marcos in two biographical films in the 1960s: Iginuhit ng Tadhana (“Marked by Fate”, 1965), a political propaganda film; and a dramatic film, Pinagbuklod ng Langit (“Heaven was Gathered”, 1965). Actress Gloria Romero starred opposite him as Imelda Marcos in both films. Gonzales and Romero starred in numerous other films together as well. They first worked together on the 1955 film, Despatsadora. In December 2010, Gonzales received a star of the Eastwood Walk of Fame, which marked his last public appearance. – Wikipedia (READ MORE)

“…Pero higit na tumatak si Luis nang gampanan niya ng dalawang beses si Pangulong Ferdinand Marcos. Ito’y sa kontrobersyal na pelikulang “Iginuhit ng Tadhana” bago tumakbo si Marcos bilang presidente noong 1965. Sinundan ito ng “Pinagbuklod ng Langit” noong 1969. Si Imee Marcos, na ginampanan noon ni Vilma Santos, naalala ang galing ni Luis na mahirap na daw tapatan ngayon. “His acting was understated. A great actor and a good friend. He played a big role in our lives. Halos naniniwala na ako na tatay ko siya dahil sa boses. Mahal na mahal namin si Luis Gonzales,” sabi ni Imee. Ayon sa kanyang kabiyak, huling hiling ni Luis na ipa-cremate ang kanyang labi…” – Mario Dumaual (READ MORE)

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